Stooge

'37 Century Modest Restoration

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(continued from the last post to see if I can use Flickr to get around the 9mb post limit)

 

I was mostly experimenting and just wanted to do the door and fenders, but did the cowl and door jambs as well. still a lot of body work to do, but atleast I have a better idea of the course to go now. next will be the roof, and rear qtrs. before spinning it around for the driver side, (shop is full right now and space is at a premium so I have to work with that for the time being)

 

46805255214_798b6ac9bd_c.jpg20190330_140843 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

spraygun.thumb.jpg.8331bc588908c20faa336a7b212f74d8.jpg

 

Also acquired what ends up being, 2 more sets of internals, plus a few extras, for the 6 bolt transmission to replace the chipped gears that were in my transmission when I bought it so I can piece meal the best ones for the rebuild. I still need to find a few things before I can mate the engine and trans, but im on the way. specifically still need everything clutch related, a starter, and the correct front motor mount plate as my 320 came from a later year and has the incorrect plate.

 

I live alone and can rebuild a transmission in the living room if I want to!

47476209152_ca47b9184e_c.jpg20190226_192650 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

32586592347_a230cdbd39_c.jpg20190222_163154-1 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

and also the 1958  edsel villager is now in the garage at my house to start mechanical work, along with his wife not wanting it at their house.

 

46613503715_2caf2044dc_c.jpg20181229_153359 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

47476210042_0b1a7cbbf9_c.jpg20181220_153518 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

 

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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Benefits of AACA Membership.

A few more days of grinding, sanding and cleaning means priming the hood, roof, rear quarter, cowl, etc. Scarily almost starting to look like a real car again 

 

20190406_140134.thumb.jpg.0d244106a3fa2db982132828877c256c.jpg

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Been awhile since an update, I lurk around here atleast once a day but progress has been semi consistent and pictures of sheet metal are sometimes not the most exciting. I've been trying to make sure I work on the Century a few days a week, though I am still in full metal repair mode, the end is sort of in sight and im planning on paint summer/ fall

 

to pick up where I left off

 running boards done on the passenger side

48126030717_216b0d5e8a_c.jpg20190623_125838 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

48125943856_38fc6a79df_z.jpg20190623_131219 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

While working on the body, I wanted something shiny to look at, while also start figuring out what flavor of black I was going to use for the exterior, so the dash got a bit of attention. Notice the tags in the first picture are from when a previous owner started parting this car out.  I still would like to do a wood grain finish at some point, but I also like the simple black dash, but its just paint and can be changed.

 

48781140738_363295fc82_z.jpg9 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49648504556_a9af9c5c45_c.jpg2020-03-11_12-43-09 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49595618931_50071edd6c_c.jpg20190922_120118 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49595618941_1c7f30b97d_c.jpg20190922_120126 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49647970438_a9d1f6a204_c.jpg2020-03-11_12-42-48 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

With the interior floor pretty wrapped up, I started to look at the rear tail panel and the weather stripping channel/ trunk perimeter that I knew was bad, but snowballed a bit.

 

Several overlapping patches of varying ages brazed, pop riveted, and sheet metal screwed in place. it was also dimensionally wrong and the trunk and rear fenders hung out passed the panel

 

48781140673_b75d17f4ea_c.jpg16 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

48781676897_20db74e107_c.jpg18 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

the start of a new tail panel

 

48897078082_676aa47c42_c.jpg2019-10-14_07-25-15 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49048847087_0098baf724_c.jpg5 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49193224503_f36591e5e9_c.jpg6 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

With the patches cut out to fit the new piece, I decided to cut out the inner trunk recess/ flat area where the clamp for the spare tire is, as it was in pretty bad shape and full of old repairs.

 

49193727341_e3b0e991d1_c.jpg3 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49193224763_245eedd458_c.jpg2 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49227706081_eb6ec9eb6b_c.jpg2 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49227235093_ec2c008f70_c.jpg4 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49227234908_ef35a38670_c.jpg6 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

this was something that I couldn't really figure out a good way to copy the original with the resources I have, so I decided I just didn't want it to look glaringly out of place when the trunk was open. I am also not quite sure what the recess is for, other than that it seems to just kick down to clear the frame rails, maybe a tool kit area?

 

49298760022_6f64899733_c.jpgScreenshot_20191229-171149_Gallery by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49338941016_4b37fea70d_c.jpg20200105_120936 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49338941066_dffd810e07_c.jpg20200105_120941 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454497786_eb2f65718a_c.jpg20200126_121941 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454729352_ab06f3ab4b_c.jpg20200126_134553 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454026868_647c170639_c.jpg20200126_113143 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454730487_a7b25dd5e1_c.jpg20200126_113131 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

While doing this, I also started building the new weather stripping/ trunk perimeter channels

 

49157010448_fc8bcd7a81_c.jpg20191201_115237 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49263638151_84d11bfc57_c.jpg4 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49157011028_e01f295a1f_c.jpg20191201_111252 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49157010813_610000b467_c.jpg20191201_111311 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49648111333_5b4254db69_c.jpg20191123_120223 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49578597608_a4c21617dd_c.jpg4 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49157010128_36429cf90c_c.jpg20191201_115826 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

And started welding it all in. it was good to start looking like something. I left the sides un-welded since I am repairing some small sections of the wheel wells and wanted to just do it all as one piece 

 

49578597588_fa2721f577_c.jpg5 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

A week or 2 ago, I decided it was time to finally pull it all apart so I can finish welding the body as well as get it ready to pull the body off of the frame to give it a clean up.

 

49579102171_086f44305a_c.jpg6 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I was a little worried about the condition of the frame as it was looking a bit crusty, and was planning on having it blasted, but out of curiosity, I  hit it with a wire wheel, looked optimistic, and after about an hour, I had the front half cleaned up and everything looks solid

 

49578597388_ee6aae37f5_c.jpg11 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I knew about the rot in the front rocker/ cowl area behind the front fenders, but didn't know to what extent. Passenger side looks a little better but with the brazing and old repairs, it will be a bigger job to repair over the driver side, which has more rot, but was left untouched. I am going to start making the new pieces this week but need to get some correct sized weld nuts for the fender mounting holes.

 

49578597463_c5ffa3f978_c.jpg8 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49578597018_84946ca589_c.jpg10 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

The fenders, hood pieces and front radiator support piece all look surprisingly clean as far as any rust or rot, so im pretty happy to not have to do much with those

 

49578597318_6bf04c92cd_c.jpg13 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49578597358_68d4eee946_c.jpg12 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49579328477_7ab05b2df5_c.jpg15 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49579328422_aa0a27b066_c.jpg16 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I think it must have been bumped at some point in the it's life as there was the same issue on the passenger side with dents and wrinkles in the same area, but I massaged them out

 

49648944532_a4e4ac60e7_c.jpg20200301_161909 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49648130343_76a98e2b27_c.jpg20200229_164415 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Some layout fluid to highlight the highs and lows

 

49648665196_17341cdb91_c.jpg20200301_163231 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49648945947_247e3404e7_c.jpg20200301_164042 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49648945987_8f2ae76d97_c.jpg20200301_164949 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49648946772_5fa8066a76_c.jpg20200301_165804 by Dan Haas, on Flickr
 

Spent the week sanding out any discoloration/ possible rust/ pits, and sprayed some high build on the fender and hood. There are a few more small dents to knock out in the fender, but having it a solid color instead of bare metal makes it alot easier for me to see where still needs work.  

 

49648129603_4181a7499e_c.jpg20200308_174037 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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12 hours ago, 39BuickEight said:

Great work!

 

Thanks, I appreciate it!

 

12 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

Way to go, sir.  Nice steering wheel!

 

  Ben

 

It really does look right at home in there, especially with the black dash, and it was some of the convincing to paint the dash black. Thanks again for sending it my way!

 

49647970438_a9d1f6a204_z.jpg2020-03-11_12-42-48 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

There have been a few other things along the way, and I've been trying to chip away at the pile of stuff that I am missing from when the car was blown apart and parted out. For the most part, this will effect the interior the most, which is fine since that isn't something that will keep the car from being drivable when it gets there, but I am still missing a few clutch related things. I have the flywheel, the correct transmission mounted pedal set and a rebuilt disc, but still need the clutch fork, pressure plate and throwout bearing. I've read on here about '80s jeep clutches working for the smaller engine cars, but not much definitive for the bigger engines as far as an easily obtainable, off the shelf clutch. I've been doing some reading, research, and have a few potentials that im going to try since I think it would be good info to put out there of what will fit/work. I had found a stock one on ebay that was a take out from a running car getting a late model engine and trans, but was outbid by someone with deeper pockets, so after that, i decided to refocus on an off the shelf one.  

 

Also found some fender lights

48781503321_a008ffc8c9_z.jpg1 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

48781140828_aede8f72d2_z.jpg2 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

a rebuilt starter, though I still need the solenoid but they seem reasonably available

 

48781140818_609df43a4e_z.jpg3 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

And among other things that im forgetting, even found the missing bracket for the cowl vent

 

49454728112_58c1b66b4c_z.jpg20200127_200929 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454024898_c4f17bb99d_z.jpg20200127_195530 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454729117_d31363a1a4_z.jpg20200127_195523 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454727907_eef0cbfc74_z.jpg20200127_202434 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454023263_c1c3686dfe_z.jpg20200127_202539 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49454136003_eccc008c8e_z.jpg20180527_151046 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

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Wow, nice work! I remember rebuilding the rear area of the trunk on my '41 Century. Not an easy job and yours turned out great!

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Looking good. The trunk tool tray area is a common area for rust out. It is not an easy area to repair. 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, MCHinson said:

Looking good. The trunk tool tray area is a common area for rust out. It is not an easy area to repair. 

 

22 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Wow, nice work! I remember rebuilding the rear area of the trunk on my '41 Century. Not an easy job and yours turned out great!

 

Thanks guys, I really appreciate it! I didn't expect the trunk area to become as involved as it is, but after I cut out the outer skin and saw the state of the inner area, doing it right and cutting it all out was the only option. Im not looking forward to welding in the perimeter channel, and im especially not looking forward to grinding all those welds down and getting it cleaned up, but again, they are beyond repair and it needs to be done. With the front cowl/ rocker area, with the exception of the very front of the floor, and an area of the trunk that i am on the fence about replacing, (a good amount of brazing repairs, but are well done and solid and being in a unseen area of the car, i think it shows a bit of the car's history) almost the entire bottom 6 or 7 inches of the car will have been replaced, so hopefully that will stave off rust issues for the car's foreseeable future.

 

49654669451_b5b149a6da_c.jpg2020-03-13_07-15-12 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Also curious, if anyone knows what wheels i have. i always thought the rear offset looked off and that they seemed to stick out a bit but chalked that up to all of the missing weight of the engine and transmission, but then i came across a set of 1937 hubcaps that i was planning on buying, but then figured out that my current wheels are shaped different.  Sort of looks like a late '40s/ early '50s full cap on there now, so im guessing someone just needed wheels that fit the bolt pattern and put them on at some point. Also has an 8.20-15 tire, and i believe the correct one is a 7.00-15?  though the size differences are almost negligible.

 

49654154388_79730742e4_c.jpg2020-03-13_07-27-29 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49654673506_ecc1cbd2f1_c.jpg2020-03-13_07-17-11 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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Sunday's project, I wanted to get started on making a new repair piece for one of the front rocker/ fender mount area infront of the doors. I need to do both sides, and since I had the car pushed over to one side, and there was more space and light on the passenger side, I started on the passenger side. Both sides are pretty rotten, but the driver side is a little worse so I figured using the slightly better passenger side as a template/ reference to start made a little bit of sense. started out cutting a 14"x14" piece and a 9"x4" piece, though I didn't take many pictures of it since there wasn't much to see.  

 

49665643381_2bc6007719_c.jpg2020-03-16_08-16-28 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I still have a brace welded into the door frame. so that still needs to be cut out and the door better aligned before I cut out the weld and weld in the new.

 

49665086548_de52948177_c.jpg20200315_101227 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49665631011_3c9292e650_c.jpg20200315_101309 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49665087718_edf25a6734_c.jpg20200315_101255 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Still need to map out where the new fender mounting threaded inserts will go, and tighten up/ clean up the edges and corners a bit better, but its a start

 

49665912597_8ec854c7f7_c.jpg20200315_153526 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49665086883_2824442b9c_c.jpg20200315_153535 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49665087348_ddc63219d6_c.jpg20200315_153705 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

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On 3/12/2020 at 11:09 PM, MCHinson said:

Looking good. The trunk tool tray area is a common area for rust out. It is not an easy area to repair. 

 

38781850_BuickTrunkRust.thumb.jpeg.f8760fca9e18e2d8994944cc02dc84f2.jpeg

Not that you'll be out in the rain much, but Buick recommends drilling drain holes in that lower trunk edge to help alleviate the rust.

 

I love following your great progress!  Your dash is stunning  in black!  Great choice.

Keep up the great work.  I'm re-living the dream all over again.

Gary

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When I got my car back from the painter, the trunk pan was full of water.  It never occurred to him that the holes in the decklid were letting water in and it was just sitting in there.  He never opened it.  A minor mistake on an otherwise great job by him.  I drilled a drain hole :)

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25 minutes ago, 39BuickEight said:

When I got my car back from the painter, the trunk pan was full of water.  It never occurred to him that the holes in the decklid were letting water in and it was just sitting in there.  He never opened it.  A minor mistake on an otherwise great job by him.  I drilled a drain hole :)

 

Yep, that's exactly why every single late-30s, early-40s GM car is rotten back there. A little leaking past the weather seals and it collects down there where you never notice it. Very rare to find a car of that vintage without some rust work in the tool tray area. Same way '50s Fords all rot in the rear seat footwells--water seeps in, gets under the carpets, and just sits there for years working on the floors. Almost impossible to find one that hasn't been patched there.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks guys! im not sure if i'll try to make it fancy, or just keep it simple and drill a hole or 2, but there is some sort of drainage planned before I start prettying it all up.

 

Im still working full time in the laboratory with all the virus stuff going around, so I didn't get the time off from a shutdown like we had been anticipating, but we do support a lot of major medical industry across various essential facets, so I get it, but I did have a lot of work planned for that time! 

I've been dragging my feet getting the rest of the tail panel welded in, but I've been trying to chip away at it.  I had originally cut the body to match the new tailpanel, but made some changes, so that's why there was a triangular hole to fill;  so poor planning rather than poor execution cutting it the first time

 

49741868991_19df9ca305_c.jpg20200321_173444 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Just a first pass clean up, but not a million miles off

 

49742190987_fa174fdd1a_c.jpg20200321_194302 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Then I started getting the nose/ radiator support and the headlight buckets cleaned up since they were the last of the removeable sheet metal that hadn't been stripped yet. The original remaining paint on the fenders and nose matched the body, but with the exception of a few dents and wrinkles in the fenders, they are in much better shape than the rest of the body and shouldn't take too much to get them finished.

 

49741872101_ff44e0d209_c.jpg20200403_200207 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49741321373_bbfb57f9f1_c.jpg20200404_135944 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49742456637_68aef4b736_c.jpg2020-04-06_07-45-48 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49741321983_289cb30976_c.jpg20200404_142715 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49741322423_38d1dcd49a_c.jpg20200404_154704 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

When I took apart the headlights to get them cleaned up, unsurprisingly, I seem to be missing a few pieces to have a complete assembly. where I've been a little nervous about some part of them getting damaged/ specifically the lenses and reflectors, I decided to get them painted so I could take them home to rebuild them and keep them out of the way while the rest of the car is being worked on. Trying to spray primer on 19" long  light buckets, hanging from a hook was pretty clumsy, so I spent 2 minutes making a little paint stand out of some scrap panel and exhaust tubing

 

49741322588_f7446d6fb4_c.jpg20200405_095023 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

From the picture, it looks a little wavy while it was wet and I thought I screwed something up, but leveled out fine

 

49741871626_1a9ab9968c_c.jpg20200405_123131 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49742193587_48157b6e5d_c.jpg20200405_123256 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

i'll going to get the lenses and chrome rings cleaned up a bit, and mock them together to have something to look at this week, I just painted the headlights yesterday so I haven't unmasked them yet.

 

Also, tracked down the correct cigarette lighter and receptacle. not the biggest priority, but the hole in the dash was bothering me

 

49741321243_90ef7d37b6_c.jpg20200327_162330 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

 

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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Looking good. Can't beat the black.

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I’m jealous of you abilities- you make it look easy. Great work.

Peter

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On ‎4‎/‎6‎/‎2020 at 5:36 PM, GARY F said:

Looking good. Can't beat the black.

 

Thanks! I'm no professional painter, though I try to give it my best,  but doing the whole body in black is going to be a challenge getting it right, but should be worth it in the end.

 

On ‎4‎/‎6‎/‎2020 at 7:24 PM, valk said:

I’m jealous of you abilities- you make it look easy. Great work.

Peter

 

Thanks! The only way I can afford it, is to do it all myself, and who doesn't like a big overwhelming project to slowly dig themselves out of??

 

 

Aside from working on the body lately, I've been trying to track down some of the still missing essential pieces to complete the driveline, and to make things easier, I've had the transmission at home in the corner so if I come across something, i have it right there to check. Looking to see if i had a retaining bolt for the reverse idler shaft last night, ended up in a mock up build of the transmission case, to really see what i was still missing, ( when i bought the transmission, it was blown apart, and the counter cluster and reverse idler gear were both significantly chipped but have since acquired 2  complete usable sets and a few extra pieces for the stash).  Fortunately, it seems i have all of the parts now, im still missing the counter cluster support shaft, though I've found one this morning, but does anyone know of a vendor for the detent springs and the shaft retention bolts? i could only find one of the springs,  have both ball bearings, but where im missing the cluster shaft, im also missing the retention bolt that holds it in place and threads in from the bottom of the case. i would imagine its the same style bolt as the reverse idler bolt, with a threaded shoulder and an a smooth/ soft pointed end.

 

Just a mock up, the bearings aren't installed and im missing the lower support shaft so everything is a little out of place

49750134677_04bfc07b4e_c.jpg20200407_200708 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

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Nice work.

 Just thinking that while the light buckets are being put back together you may want to consider putting in 6V relays for the headlamps. This will provide 6V at the globe and provide the best possible lighting, even better if you head down the QH path in 6V. The relays are easy to wire and totally hidden from prying eyes and judges in the big buckets. Made a huge difference on my ‘38 where at first you needed a match to see if the headlights were on.

just my two bobs worth! 😀😀😀😀😀😀

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58 minutes ago, rodneybeauchamp said:

Nice work.

 Just thinking that while the light buckets are being put back together you may want to consider putting in 6V relays for the headlamps. This will provide 6V at the globe and provide the best possible lighting, even better if you head down the QH path in 6V. The relays are easy to wire and totally hidden from prying eyes and judges in the big buckets. Made a huge difference on my ‘38 where at first you needed a match to see if the headlights were on.

just my two bobs worth! 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

Another option to consider is a good heavy duty separate ground wire from the reflector bucket to a good chassis ground. On my 1938 I installed a new wiring harness, so I feel confident that the wiring is as good as new, but I added a nice heavy ground wire from the reflector buckets to a headlight mounting bolt and the headlights are nearly as bright as the sealed beam headlights in my 1937 Century without even having the reflectors properly redone on the 1938 Century.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, rodneybeauchamp said:

Nice work.

 Just thinking that while the light buckets are being put back together you may want to consider putting in 6V relays for the headlamps. This will provide 6V at the globe and provide the best possible lighting, even better if you head down the QH path in 6V. The relays are easy to wire and totally hidden from prying eyes and judges in the big buckets. Made a huge difference on my ‘38 where at first you needed a match to see if the headlights were on.

just my two bobs worth! 😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

2 hours ago, MCHinson said:

 

Another option to consider is a good heavy duty separate ground wire from the reflector bucket to a good chassis ground. On my 1938 I installed a new wiring harness, so I feel confident that the wiring is as good as new, but I added a nice heavy ground wire from the reflector buckets to a headlight mounting bolt and the headlights are nearly as bright as the sealed beam headlights in my 1937 Century without even having the reflectors properly redone on the 1938 Century.

 

I'll end up with a new harness as only the inside of one of the headlights had any sort of wiring in it, and that was in pretty bad shape an held together with duct tape, though I was planning on getting a complete car kit from either Rhode Island wiring or YNZ as that headlight bucket probably had the most wiring in it out of the entire car as it sits. I am keeping it 6volt and plan on taking it on some road trips so I want the headlights to be as good as they can be. I was reading about the benefits of the Uvira coating, as my reflectors look fairly tarnished,  but haven't reached out to them yet, though I believe I need to send the reflectors out for nickel plating prior to sending them to Uvira.

MCHinson, what did you use for the sealed beam conversion in your 1937? I was reading the 1998 Torque tube article on the headlights, but that seems to just be about disassembly/ assembly, etc.

 

Unmasked the headlights the other day, and cleaned up the bezels a bit just for something to look at. im not happy with one of the edges for the ribbed trim piece, so they'll probably get painted again

 

49768748156_1c929a76c4_c.jpg20200411_111000 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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Took me a few minutes to find it, but if you read starting on page 12 of this .pdf newsletter, you will see how I converted the car to sealed beams basically following an old article from 1973 from Rod and Custom magazine. That article is also reprinted in that Torque Tube II issue following my article. 

 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwkvul_TyYjSaWVGTUQ1TnpubmM/view?usp=sharing

Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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That's a great write up, thanks!  and since I am missing some of the headlight innards, I dont feel bad about retrofitting it I think I have  a pile of parts kicking around my backroom from a 1964 Impala SS that  I was working on. i'll have to check if I have the bulb cups, but if not, a quick ebay search seems like I wont have much trouble finding them.

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Finally stopped dragging my feet a few nights ago, and started welding in the driver side tail panel, the big gap at the top was from when I made some changes after the first cuts were made. Just a first pass and still needs some clean up, and the small filler piece I had to make was giving me grief since there was some undiscovered brazing on the underside of the sheet metal where the 3 new pieces met the body, so  I called it a night

 

49780670137_54789ca6ab_c.jpg20200415_175655 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49779801813_080d22e509_c.jpg20200415_195458 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49780670872_b39606c6aa_c.jpg20200415_201651 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I wanted to get the tail panel, most welded in so there wouldn't be any body panels flopping around, since Friday I recruited a buddy and we got the body off of the chassis and set on some stands

 

49796722053_07a67d1948_c.jpg20200417_160454 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49797267196_e2a47142ed_c.jpg20200417_161235 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49796722263_fe5451a32c_c.jpg20200417_163038 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I had been planning on sending the frame out to be sandblasted as it looked pretty crusty, and honestly I was a little nervous about the condition of it before I started pulling the body apart. When I first pulled the nose off, and gave it a quick hit with a wire wheel, it cleaned up surprisingly easy, and with everyone being shut down, and in the interest of sacrificing a weekend to save some budget, I spent around 10hrs between Saturday and Sunday cleaning it up. I don't want to suggest that this was a good idea, a safe idea, or a good use of time, but no blood/ incidents, a few near misses when a wheel would grab something and bounce off suddenly, especially with all of the X frame structure and crevices. I am pretty happy with the results, it came out a lot better than i was expecting and really was a lot easier and went quicker than i was expecting. Im going to try and get it painted this week, order a gas tank, ( probably a nova tank from Tanks Inc, inexpensive since I will need to cut and modify it to reposition the filler neck), some fuel line and brake line, and try and run those lines while the body is off to make life a little easier for when Im actually close to needing to connect the brakes and fuel, but the body will be back on the chassis.  

 

49796558778_b958a94ab9_c.jpg20200418_123032 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49796558933_7363bc6cba_c.jpg20200418_143856 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49797412362_4d01398ef1_c.jpg20200419_135728 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49797104576_5f41c9cd11_c.jpg20200419_135739 by Dan Haas, on Flickr
 

Also, came across an ebay ad for a new old stock door panel for a 1937 Buick coupe a week or 2 ago for $100, so Wednesday or Thursday, i threw out a best offer of $50 and they accepted and was delivered sunday from fedex, which i didn't know they made deliveries on sundays.

Looks stained in the picture, and im sure its a little faded, but really good condition. Not sure the history on this type of thing, if they were remanufactured for awhile afterwards, or if this has just been sitting in a box for 80+ yrs

 

49796680323_479f9ef333_c.jpg2020-04-20_07-50-06 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Luxor Motor Sales ?

Grand Rapids, MI

 

49796559853_f377d8877f_c.jpg20200419_170813 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49797413067_b89f1dbe4d_c.jpg20200419_170817 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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Had to stop by my shop after work last night, and decided that since the new gas tank is on order, I should get to work and gave the frame a quick once over a degreaser and got to painting. I've become a fan of painting chassis parts and frames with tractor and implement paint, goes on easy and with the hardener, is extremely durable. There are a few crevices im going to go back through with a brush like the rear shock body pockets and stuff, but that was enough for an after work weeknight, and will give it enough time to dry before I start messing around mounting a tank and lines, etc. while im at it, im probably going to get the rear exhaust hangers in place and maybe buy a new set or parking brake cables since mine are in pretty rough shape and Bob's has them for $130 for the rear pair.

 

49796558263_f34fc68e7a_c.jpg20200418_160210 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49801580836_096e2bd5d6_c.jpg2020-04-21_09-05-29 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49801392251_0c88f3601f_c.jpg20200420_202109 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49801392461_8125509039_c.jpg20200420_200747 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

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A few recent things, im the proud new owner of a rebuilt 11" pressure plate, which with the exception of a clutch fork, means I almost have a full drive train

49836519303_e492080e4b_z.jpg20200427_204241 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Dug out the shocks that I've acquired, one is different and I believe may be from a slightly later Oldsmobile, but the other 2 seems to be a matching pair, and also match the mounting holes in the rear sway bar. One was pretty well frozen, but with a little work and some oil, both seems to move freely and are building tension pressure, but I still plan on sending them out for rebuild as one of them was pretty dry so im assuming whatever rubber is inside would be pretty deteriorated. still need the shock links to the rear end, but I need to go through my boxes to see whats in there,  though I think I have seen them for sale through Bob's or another vendor.

 

49858949122_7e672a0074_z.jpg20200503_174041 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Feel free to skip the rest, and remember this is a modest- 'lets try and do a nice job on a small budget because my last project was waay over budget' project and this car was stripped clean and sold off of alot of the useful/ hard to find pieces :rolleyes:

 

No gas tank or straps came with this car, after some measuring and going over everything, I decided on a first gen Camaro/ firebird tank. Came from Tanks inc, was inexpensive, but I already knew there was going to be modifications so I wasn't that worried, though the metal was a little thin.

 

49825774621_542ce6d4bc_z.jpg20200424_175819 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49825774791_cc592ab17b_z.jpg20200424_181557 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49826090952_b9dd7cc4fc_z.jpg20200424_202814 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49825238638_9fc87a8a34_z.jpg20200424_203915 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Next was making some mounting straps, decided on 1/8, a little on the thick side and overkill, but worked well and is something I wont have to worry about.  Some T bolts from McMaster Carr, 3/8-16

 

49858102363_dbfaf123b6_c.jpg20200502_150237 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Bent to follow the shape of the tank, i'll be cutting some rubber strips and adhering them to act as isolators, but Im going to have to to pull the tank a few times when the body is back on to make the passenger side filler neck, as well as paint the tank and straps and reseal the tank after its been welded

 

49882300008_032a5c1340_c.jpg20200510_135557 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I've been really trying to avoid doing any sort of non-reversible welding on the frame, but I conceded and filled 2 of the factory gas tank slots on the rear, and used (2) 3/8-16 weld nuts to act as the rear mount. This keeps the tank accessible from underneath and takes out the need of trying to fish a wrench on top when the body is back on and keeps the tools needed to service it, if the need arises, to a minimum. I plan on taking this car on some longer road trips when its done, and keeping things accessible is something im really trying to keep in mind for when im on the side of the road a few states away from home

 

49882300593_3eeb41ba1c_c.jpg20200510_130147 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49882830341_2a99117b61_c.jpg20200510_134310 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

I did use the front mounts without any sort of modification to the frame,

 

49883137192_41e217710d_c.jpg20200510_141323 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49883136932_efbdda921b_c.jpg20200510_141315 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

The next, not completely correct piece, was that the 320 engine I have, is from a 1947 and as such has a different front engine mount plate behind the timing chain. I've been looking without much luck, though I did have someone offer to sell me one for $500, but I politely declined, so I figured I would give this a try. I still need to pull the piece out and weld it from the backside and fish plate it for a little extra security but it at least keeps the ball rolling in the right direction.

 

Made a quick and dirty frame template

49814159512_5a336a60a5_c.jpg20200422_202032 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Some cuts made

 

49826089867_f864e88372_c.jpg20200425_144715 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

And some bends to make the lower angled edge into a horizontal plane

 

49825237828_cdb565db07_c.jpg20200425_152338 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

one of the filler pieces, made from 3/16 plate.

 

49825774276_6820b7d687_c.jpg20200425_152438 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

Aesthetically, I should have made 2 separate pieces for the larger filler piece and made the side piece rounded instead of one piece that I scored and bent, but having it squared off a bit will give more clearance to getting long enough bolts in and out 

 

49825287558_962f20435b_z.jpg2020-04-27_10-13-28 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49825237368_ef152f4297_c.jpg20200426_123750 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49825237063_075f1b3b38_c.jpg20200426_133608 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

49825237373_884da4c952_c.jpg20200426_132944 by Dan Haas, on Flickr

 

 

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
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