Stooge

'37 Century Modest Restoration

Recommended Posts

Nice work.  I still have your piles of goodies here.  I'm trying to get back to that place to check on the other stuff before I have you make the trip up.  I'm sure there will be more freebees if I get back there as a lot of the stuff is in box lots so I get stuff. Idon't really want but is still quite useful to someone doing a car like yours.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

I like having the Chassis Parts Manual and also the Body Parts Manual. I don't have to refer to them that often, but occasionally it helps you figure out something. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, MCHinson said:

I like having the Chassis Parts Manual and also the Body Parts Manual. I don't have to refer to them that often, but occasionally it helps you figure out something. 

 

I hadn't realized there were separate parts manuals for both the chassis and body, but where I am missing a lot of original parts, it would probably be handy to have the manuals to cross reference what interchanges while I search for some of the not so obvious pieces.

 

21 hours ago, 1937-44 said:

 The shop manual has 10 pages covering the transmissions of both large and small series transmissions.

 

 Another source for manuals would be Faxon. Here is a link;    http://www.faxonautoliterature.com/Search.aspx?c=3963

 

Carl

 

Thank you, the Faxon site seems to have a plethora of what I am looking for, and I also directed the my friend with the Edsel Villager to that site as they seem to have all of the literature for that series of cars. 10 pages dedicated to the transmission should be a pretty good start, coupled with a master parts manual, I should be alright, its just going to come down to finding the replacement gears I need. I have come across another book I am thinking of picking up, titled A Manual of Servicing Transmissions and Rear Axles 1935 -1942. I think its going to be slightly broad as they cover a large range of vehicle brands rather than specific to Buick, but it never hurts to have alternate sources to bounce ideas off of.  https://www.ebay.com/itm/1935-36-37-38-39-40-41-42-Transmission-Rear-Axles-Repair-Manual-STEP-BY-STEP/282852434859?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649

 

22 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Nice work.  I still have your piles of goodies here.  I'm trying to get back to that place to check on the other stuff before I have you make the trip up.  I'm sure there will be more freebees if I get back there as a lot of the stuff is in box lots so I get stuff. Idon't really want but is still quite useful to someone doing a car like yours.  

 

 Thanks! thankfully the door was a pretty painless rebuild, which is nice since I need to do the same to the passenger side door, so I can only hope that one goes as smoothly. Please don't rush on my account, i would hate to inconvenience anyone, and I am very appreciative both of any spares or extras you want to get rid of but don't want to throw out, as well as any of the sought after parts that I do not have that you may come across.  

 

Something i was thinking of was, does anyone make a reproduction radiator? i have seen one listed on Brass Works but i believe that is to service an original. Cooling is something i am generally paranoid about with any of my cars, and i plan to do a few roadtrips with the Century, and a radiator is an area i would like to not have to worry about too much. Although i suppose a reproduction is just as possible to have an issue as a rebuilt one.

 

Fastenal freight called last night, and my transmission has arrived in Massachusetts, sent up from an associate of Pete Philips in Texas, so i am hopefully taking off from work a bit early to go pick that up a few towns over and i can really start to assess what i need as i will finally have a "complete" driveline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Stooge said:

I am thinking of picking up, titled A Manual of Servicing Transmissions and Rear Axles 1935 -1942. I think its going to be slightly broad as they cover a large range of vehicle brands rather than specific to Buick, but it never hurts to have alternate sources to bounce ideas off of.  https://www.ebay.com/itm/1935-36-37-38-39-40-41-42-Transmission-Rear-Axles-Repair-Manual-STEP-BY-STEP/282852434859?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649

 

 Your welcome.I prefer original manuals, but Faxon's copies are nice for the price. I was somewhat remiss to also not mention the Buick Heritage Alliance. You might want to check it out as well;  http://www.buickheritagealliance.org/index.php/archives/search/1937+buick

 

 I have a book similar to the one on Ebay (A Manual on Servicing Transmissions and Rear Axles) covering 1935-1942 only mine was from Lempco Products. As you surmised it s rather broad. Mine has roughly 1.5 pages dedicated to the large series Buick for 1936-1938.

 

Carl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll check on that radiator when I get back there.  I can measure the cores.  We can compare that to someone with a special and a century to see which it is.  As I mentioned.  I wouldn't be surprised if it was recored,  to have been done to a larger capacity.  Usually not much difference in cost on the whole job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picked up a big piece of the puzzle today after work, now i just need to figure out whats damaged or can be repaired. So far it appears just these pieces are the ones with chipped gear teeth, one is stamped with K227- 3 and the other has no direct stamping but does have TS259-10 on the main piece

20180228_162659.jpg

20180228_162841.jpg

20180228_162830.jpg

20180228_162855.jpg

20180228_162858.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Hollander shows the cluster (their number T222-8) as the same for '37-'40 60, 70, 80, 90. The '41- gear has the same number with a D suffix, so it is different in some way. BTW, the case should be #1298438. The other gear is the M.S. Low and Reverse? (M.S. = main shaft I think, to differentiate it from the idler). That is the same across the same years, with the '41- also having a D suffix.

 

In 1952 the cluster cost $22.50 and the Low gear $10.25, for your amusement.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Thank you Spinney, that is exactly what I was curious about. I ordered a few books the other night including the master parts list and service  manual, but while I wait for those to come in, I was curious to see whats out there for replacements or new old stock.

 

Bobs and Classic NOS parts have a few possibilities and this cluster especially looked promising but a factory replacement part number is not given,  but given the suggested years, I may contact them about it regarding any stamping on the part itself  http://bobsautomobilia.com/transmission/40-48-new-40-48-big-ser.counter-gear-.-cg-408n/ 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Stooge said:

Bobs and Classic NOS parts have a few possibilities and this cluster especially looked promising

Count the teeth on each, the diameter, length, spacings, ID? They are at least cut in the same direction. The Hollander shows the '41-'49 as being the same with the D suffix after their number.

 

Just confirm you have that case number. If not, put up what you have and I'll look up the year for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liking the work you are doing on your 1937 Century.

I was searching the forum tracking down some parts I remember  be advertised several years ago and came across this old post.

I notice at that time they were parting out a 1937 Century 2 Door.

 

I have used them for oddball pieces and found them good to deal with. They may be handy to contact if you are looking foe something unusual or year specific fittings.

 

Keep up the good work. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

Count the teeth on each, the diameter, length, spacings, ID? They are at least cut in the same direction. The Hollander shows the '41-'49 as being the same with the D suffix after their number.

 

Just confirm you have that case number. If not, put up what you have and I'll look up the year for you.

 

Thanks again, i thought i had the case number written down with the gear part numbers i have, but i will need to pop over to my shop and grab it sometime. Unfortunately we are hving a pretty good storm here and lost power last night, along with alot of trees and power lines down, so i havent been venturing out yet.

 

8 hours ago, 50jetback said:

Liking the work you are doing on your 1937 Century.

I was searching the forum tracking down some parts I remember  be advertised several years ago and came across this old post.

I notice at that time they were parting out a 1937 Century 2 Door.

 

I have used them for oddball pieces and found them good to deal with. They may be handy to contact if you are looking foe something unusual or year specific fittings.

 

Keep up the good work. 

 

Thanks, its a fun car to work on and research, especially now that im accumulating some parts and making some progress on it. 

RPm motorsports actually has quite a large ebay store and still has many parts for late 30s buicks. I have a few planned things im buying from them and have also sent some parts requests their way for both the buick and a few other cars. Seem like good people and their prices seem quite reasonable

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may not apply to your transmission but I'll mention it anyway.  As for gears, the '37 and '38 gears are not all interchangeable. As a teenage back in the 1960's, my '37 Special would fly out of gear when accelerating; it turned out to be the tip of the mainshaft gear had broken off. I then acquired a '38 transmission from Midnight Auto Parts, I found that some of the gears didn't work in a '37 (don't recall which gears; it could have been just the synchro's).  Eventually I ended up with a hybrid transmission that worked fine for years.

 

I love your coupe and that you are undertaking such a big job!  Keep up the good work.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to The Hollander, the only gear in the '38 that is different to the '37 60, 80, 90 is the main drive gear. All other parts are the same, except for the case which as a different number.

 

The MDG is the "input" gear that includes the clutch spline.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, BuicksBuicks said:

This may not apply to your transmission but I'll mention it anyway.  As for gears, the '37 and '38 gears are not all interchangeable. As a teenage back in the 1960's, my '37 Special would fly out of gear when accelerating; it turned out to be the tip of the mainshaft gear had broken off. I then acquired a '38 transmission from Midnight Auto Parts, I found that some of the gears didn't work in a '37 (don't recall which gears; it could have been just the synchro's).  Eventually I ended up with a hybrid transmission that worked fine for years.

 

I love your coupe and that you are undertaking such a big job!  Keep up the good work.

 

Hi, thanks, its a car that i'm getting really excited about and it is exactly what I wanted in my first prewar car, especially after working on other people's street rodded prewar cars and deciding that's not what I was interested in. I should be able to keep costs down pretty well with doing the metal, body, paint, electrical and plumbing, though I may have the head done and block checked out by the engine machine shop/ funny car shop out in the front of the building where my shop is. a good buddy who owns a paint and finishing shop volunteered to powder coat whatever I need powder coated and we are also planning to dip the window garnishings and dash in his hydrographics tank for the simulated wood grain. the big killer I am trying not to think about are the bumpers. they are in pretty bad shape, most of the chrome is nonexistent and they are pretty well pitted and rusty and getting them fixed and replated is going to be one of those 'bite the bullet' instances. that's pretty far down the road though, so i'll try and worry about that later.

 

On ‎3‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 2:23 PM, Spinneyhill said:

The Hollander shows the cluster (their number T222-8) as the same for '37-'40 60, 70, 80, 90. The '41- gear has the same number with a D suffix, so it is different in some way. BTW, the case should be #1298438. The other gear is the M.S. Low and Reverse? (M.S. = main shaft I think, to differentiate it from the idler). That is the same across the same years, with the '41- also having a D suffix.

 

In 1952 the cluster cost $22.50 and the Low gear $10.25, for your amusement.

 

Sounds like I have the right case then atleast! the teeth are 21, 17, 16,16, although i'll have to mic out the dimensions this morning sometime. 20180306_223821.thumb.jpg.a853b7630415fa0135786ce71876ccba.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stooge, I did my garnish, glove box lid and insturment surround of my `36 Buick coupe in the Hydographics Coffeewood Burl, would have done the dash also but it is not removable. I really like it. Don`t forget to do the vent window divider post covers..  One difference in the `37&`38 transmission is the dia. of the input shaft, `37 is larger dia. Tom

Edited by pont35cpe (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i managed to find one piece of 'clean'ish trim piece with the original wood grain that I will end up using for a reference, although the coffeewood burl does look really nice according to google. Unfortunately theres very  little remaining on the window garnishings, any other interior trim and the dash is completely void of any of the simulated wood grain, but I will put the woodgrain back on all of the pieces that originally had it. I haven't looked too closely at my dash, but I would assume there is a way to pop it out from referencing Gary's thread where he had removed his dash, unless the '36 was non-removable versus the '37. Plus removing the dash from the car, will make it a whole lot easier to sand all of the rust off. it's pretty solid, without any rot, but has a lot of surface rust covering everything.

 

trim.jpg

dash.jpg

garys dash.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the dash on your 1937 Buick is removable. There are quite a few small screws to find around the perimeter to be able to remove it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So this may be one of those areas of Modest restoration where i might lose some people so i'll try and make it quick, but remember, this car was destined for rat rod status on a minitruck chassis and an LS swap before i bought it :rolleyes: 

 

Today i started on the driver side running board as this car didnt come with either side, nevermind even a junky set that i could repair. After alot of studying pictures of other coupes, and figuring out some reference points and temporarily hanging the driver side door back up, i started with some cardboard and transfered that over to some sheetmetal and added a rounded edge and squared bottom edge that folds underneath to make it a little more rigid. There will be more structure underneath when i find/make some adjustable brackets to make aligning it easier and will be covered in a corrugated/ribbed mat eventually. The edges also still need to be trimmed and i will be adding a lip on body facing edge Where it will tuck up into the body like the stock one would, as well as an edge around the front and rear fender facing edges.

20180310_130127.thumb.jpg.16314db1d64fd4400ac43b9bbc139755.jpg20180310_130155.thumb.jpg.30f88f523eaa511dde25a51fb0ff159b.jpg20180310_152226.thumb.jpg.43f8da3da3cf69b8fb68e46424277672.jpg

20180310_152331.thumb.jpg.af016d6300fc17373fccd924953148bd.jpg20180310_152342.thumb.jpg.ef55dc399304bd8563f4374402daeab8.jpg20180310_152425.thumb.jpg.e5c87072b70f9bd5fe24e48cbd317556.jpg

20180310_152434.thumb.jpg.f2538e683babf7f2f0ed935aedd01a07.jpg

20180310_152450.thumb.jpg.e6f274eceb9a345401b3e58cdfcc7f77.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like they will certainly do the job. If you would like them to look a bit more like the originals, I could take some measurements for you. The profile looks like it sticks out a bit further than the originals and wraps around the front fender quite a bit more than the originals. If you want to see some photos, the first page of my restoration thread has some photos that show the shape of the original running boards.  If you need dimensions or better photos, I will be happy to help you. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, i wasnt sure if it was going to be one of those high hopes situations where it ends up looking like trash, but its coming out a little better than i was expecting.

MC, that would be great, as i was mostly just sitting on the floor with some rulers and tape trying to zoom in on blurry pictures of where the ends met, (notice the blue tape 'guess'mark on the front fender :rolleyes:). I intentionally left it a bit long so it could be shortened/reshaped back a bit. right now it is butted up against the frame, so i can trim back the frame side along with "opening" up the area where it wraps around the fenders and pull it in a bit. A measurement from the frame to the corner of outmost, curved point at either end would be the most helpful guide, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a few photos of the finished running boards on my '37 Special.  There is just about a 3/4" clearance everywhere, and that's with the rubber vulcanized on the board.  I basically loosened up all the mounting nuts and bolts, positioned the board so the gaps were consistent following all the fender contours and tightened it up.  I hope these help!

 

 

DSC_3929.thumb.jpg.9ad0eda3b6cc171456a58a16db85756d.jpg

 

 

 

DSC_3933.thumb.jpg.f1c74e4774b57067c42de25f1f9fdda5.jpg

 

 

DSC_3936.thumb.jpg.d600733e4cf80fde01124a7615b89885.jpg

 

Keep up the great job!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Gary, both for the measurements  and compliment, I really appreciate it!  If you had to venture a guess, how thick would you say the material is that was vulcanized to the boards, I would imagine in the 3/16 area on the non-beaded flat spots? Planning ahead, I am thinking if I trim them back to leave the better part of an inch gap between the board edges and the front and rear fenders, that will leave me with ample room to align and adjust accordingly, even with the added thickness of the rubber mat, but without leaving too big of a gap, that it looks "off". 

 

Unfortunately, no work on the Buick yesterday as I am trying to finish up the metal work on a GTO for someone so it can go to paint sooner than later. This is a car that came in about 2years ago that looked great, but was hiding a lot of rust and very poor previous repairs and has turned into a much bigger project than I would have imagined, though it is finally in the home stretch. although I'm not so much into 60's muscle cars, this has grown on me a bit. 

 

 

 

40056232614_72f6846f23_z.jpg

Edited by Stooge (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a set of 1938 Special running boards with the metal in decent shape as well as a really bad set of 1938 Century running boards. I also have a decemt set of original 1937 running boards on my 1937 Century. It appears that the 1937 and 1938 running boards are probably the same size, although they have different part numbers so they should not be exactly the same.

 

My current plans are to take the Special boards, cut them and insert a 4 inch wide section to lengthen them to use on my 1938 Century project. I took some photos to attempt to help you this morning. It was starting to rain as I finshed up so I did not pull the 1937 Century outside into the sunlight for some better photos. I will be happy to do that whenever I get a clear day again soon if you would like. 

 

The inner edge of the Special running boards are approximetely 58 1/2 inches long. The inner edge of the Century running boards are approximetely 62 1/2 inches long.

The outer edge of the Special running boards are approximetely 62 1/2 inches long. The inner edge of the Century running boards are approximetely 66 1/2 inches long.  

 

The narrow end of all of the running boards are approximately 9 1/2 inches wide. The wide (front) end of all of the running boards aare approximately 15 inches wide. If you need any other photos or measurements, please let me know.      

DSC_0408.JPG

DSC_0409.JPG

DSC_0410.JPG

DSC_0411.JPG

DSC_0412.JPG

DSC_0413.JPG

DSC_0414.JPG

DSC_0415.JPG

DSC_0416.JPG

DSC_0417.JPG

DSC_0418.JPG

DSC_0419.JPG

DSC_0420.JPG

DSC_0421.JPG

DSC_0422.JPG

DSC_0423.JPG

DSC_0424.JPG

DSC_0425.JPG

DSC_0426.JPG

DSC_0427.JPG

DSC_0428.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now