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65 rivi

Interior/exterior

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I currently have a all original 65 Riviera all original matching numbers and would like to know if changing the color scheme of the interior and exterior will be effect its value there are some things about this car that I don't believe are very common in my limited exposure to these vehicles, for instance the stitching and color of the interior(green) as well as power wing windows any information would be appreciated. 

Edited by 65 rivi (see edit history)

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I love green on automobiles. Especially metallic.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We green beholders are a minority.

Green is a very hard sell for most.

 

Keep her.

 

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Need to be very careful when changing colors with a hope of increasing value. First, it can be very expensive to "properly" change an exterior and interior color. Short cutting the process will not be advantageous. What is you color combination now? I usually prefer to leave a car the color combo it came with from the factory but I also have seen many examples where what is perceived  by the average enthusiast as a boring factory color combo, was changed and it transformed the car into having high curb appeal status. Often we humans  spend money on things that look pretty so yes, a properly executed color change can help value on the premise of it being pleasing to a larger number of buyers (increasing buying pool). But it also depends what the color is now. Changing color can have a negative effect due to no longer being like it came from the factory so to overcome that, you need to be very selective. Certainly its best if colors are chosen that were available on the year and model as standard. This is generally an acceptable  practice. For example BCA does not deduct in its 400 point judging for  a non born-with color as long as it was available.

Bottom line is you need to be happy with the choice.

As far as adding options, sure adding certain options can help value but generally it will do more to help the car sell easier, and perhaps not so much for more money especially if you have to pay a premium for the parts needed to  install the option. When adding options it is best to do it so it appears just like the factory did it. 

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
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I personally appreciate originality; as in 'presentable', but flawed original finish over a repaint.  Of course, once the paint finish passes the point of no return and repaint is necessary, options in my order of preference are: (1) original 'born-with' color, (2) available factory color and (2) 'special color' - color available on another brand in the corporate palette (e.g., a year appropriate Cadillac color on a Buick).  I agree with JZRIV in that sometimes a color change can really enhance curb appeal...

Edited by EmTee
typo (see edit history)

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Best to post more info re your car and its present condition to receive helpful answers. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. HOW original is your car? Miles? Care? Condition? As has been stated, if original and in presentable/salvagable condition the impotance of color combo may be diminished because the market is increasingly putting a premium on original condition cars no matter the color. BTW, green exteriors or interiors are not unusual to find in `60`s and `70`s Buicks. Buick buyers were traditionally big on earth tones.

  Tom Mooney

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X2 on the pictures. It's easier to see what you're trying to describe.

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My '64 was brown, Bronze mist, until 1980, when I painted it Claret Mist. So far it hasn't affected the price.

 

Value and market apply to My Riviera about the same as bragging about how well my Wife does laundry.

Bernie

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                      I have a bright orange GTO convertible, a bright red Chevelle SS396., and a bright yellow Camaro and my  Seafoam Green

Riviera gets by far the most thumbs up and comments regarding how beautiful the color is. If you have a Green/Green car, leave it that way.

If the outside is not green, that is a rare combo and I would keep it that way as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Changing the interior is much more of a PITA than changing the paint.  Unless the current interior is trashed, it's likely a money-losing proposition as well.

 

As a general rule, rather than change the interior, paint, and go on a hunt to piece together all the options you'd like to have, you'll be money ahead to find a car that's already got what you want.

 

Having said all that, if you're got a decent green interior, keep it.  Green is cool.

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Sometimes you find a really good car in a really bad color. Bad is subjective, but that's what happened to me. Since I was planning a full restoration anyway, I elected to do it in a combination I like. I re-did a light blue/teal car to a silver/black car using all factory codes and materials. It makes me happy and I think it would sell better, if I ever did sell it. It's your car, make it a color combination you like. "If it makes you happy, it can't be that bad". PRL

 

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                        One other determining factor. If you have the light green cloth interior, and it needs everything redone, I think you 

will find that you can't buy the material to restore it properly, so a color change to an available color like saddle, white or black might

be necessary. If you have the dark green vinyl interior the color of vinyl upholstery that is available is not a perfect match but off a little

so you would have to redo everything to get it looking nice. Also the correct shade of dark green carpet for either of the green interiors is not available

so you would have to dye new carpet to match. Also you can't buy the correct light green headliner for the green interior cars if your headliner or sunvisors need replacing.  Post some detailed pictures of the car as it is now and we can advise what you should do.

Edited by Seafoam65 (see edit history)

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OTOH, an exact match with the original colors is not necessary (and "properly" is a matter of opinion ;) ).  Get something that looks good and is plausibly original and go with it.  So the carpet's a half a shade off or the seat inserts are a slightly different color.  BFD.  The test is whether it all goes together.   If you want to do a spectral analysis to get an exact color match, you're setting yourself up for disappointment.  And guess what?  There is no "perfect" match for the original, anyway.  Different lots of material and carpet were different shades even when they were new.

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Who has good enough color vision to tell if a color is a shade off.  There's no way to see any two interiors side by side.  Make it all work together and you'll be a happy camper.   

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On 2/10/2018 at 7:12 AM, 65 rivi said:

I currently have a all original 65 Riviera all original matching numbers and would like to know if changing the color scheme of the interior and exterior will be effect its value there are some things about this car that I don't believe are very common in my limited exposure to these vehicles, for instance the stitching and color of the interior(green) as well as power wing windows any information would be appreciated. 

  I have an excellent green cloth interior which I removed from an aborted restoration. The cloth has been changed by the previous owner, who is an upholsterer. The replacement cloth is not the original style but is actually quite beautiful, no pattern, just a nice sheen. But I have more than enough NOS green cloth to bring the interior back to its factory appearance. Probably enough to do 2 or even 3 interiors total.

  If you are interested in the whole interior send me a PM. I will not separate,

  Tom Mooney

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13 hours ago, KongaMan said:

OTOH, an exact match with the original colors is not necessary (and "properly" is a matter of opinion ;) ).  Get something that looks good and is plausibly original and go with it.  So the carpet's a half a shade off or the seat inserts are a slightly different color.  BFD.  The test is whether it all goes together.   If you want to do a spectral analysis to get an exact color match, you're setting yourself up for disappointment.  And guess what?  There is no "perfect" match for the original, anyway.  Different lots of material and carpet were different shades even when they were new.

 

 You are so correct in that color can be slightly different from run to run. That is exactly why we would buy extra hides and yardage in the initial order for a job.

Interesting that we can be so concerned about an exact match with something when Buick painted the front clip separate of the rest of the body. I understand it resulted in a mismatch sometimes or so I have read in these forums.

 

 It really boils down to what you expect of the finished job and what you want to achieve.  Do you want a 400 point restoration? Or do you want an extremely respectable car to enjoy and drive.  Just my $ 0.02 worth.

 

 Loren

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Before I bought my Riv, I looked at a 62 Thunderbird that had a red interior. Every single piece was a different shade of red. Seats turned dark, some of the hard plastics turned dark pink, a couple of pieces stayed bright red. It's interesting how age affected the material's colors.

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My '64 Riviera was bronze mist until 1980. It has been claret mist since then. I did that, don't care much for brown cars. Now it has been red longer than it was brown.

 

Today is our wedding anniversary. I have been married just as many years as I wasn't. Sometimes having just one thing your way is a pretty nice feeling.

 

Paint it!

 

Bernie

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On 2/10/2018 at 11:48 AM, 60FlatTop said:

My '64 was brown, Bronze mist, until 1980, when I painted it Claret Mist. So far it hasn't affected the price.

 

Value and market apply to My Riviera about the same as bragging about how well my Wife does laundry.

Bernie

Bernie, some of us may have some interest in what helps resale value of our collector car. All of us know or should know finding the “ right” buyer is half the sale. The other half of the sale is showing how the value of this fine automobile far outweighs the investment. 

Red Riviera Bob

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If you're into 50s, 60s, and 70s cars, you're probably going to be okay with a green car.  They were popular in their time and they'll be a good car for people who are fond of the era.  My 70 Skylark was a mint green with a dark green vinyl top and dark green interior. Got lots of thumbs-up when I drove it.

 

Ed

 

 

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21 hours ago, Red Riviera Bob said:

showing how the value of this fine automobile far outweighs the investment. 

 

Won't happen. The cars are a liability. Please yourself first. You can increase the value of a car. After 50 years my rule of thumb is "For every extra $1,000 I am willing to spend on a car, I can get $4,000 worth of someone else's work." And that has been holding true for 30 years or more.

 

If you paint a car an keep it for, say, 10 years. And, like in my area, drive it once a day for 6 months of the year, you will walk up to the car and look back walking away about 3560 times. You can say to yourself "I really like that car in my favorite color." OR you can say "That next owner is going to be so happy the car is the original color, I can't wait to see how happy he is."

 

And I always look back with a smile. I also notice if I left the light s when I do that, saves on the battery.

Bernie

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On February 10, 2018 at 8:12 AM, 65 rivi said:

I currently have a all original 65 Riviera all original matching numbers and would like to know if changing the color scheme of the interior and exterior will be effect its value there are some things about this car that I don't believe are very common in my limited exposure to these vehicles, for instance the stitching and color of the interior(green) as well as power wing windows any information would be appreciated. 

It would absolutely KILL the value of the car, switching the interior color or the exterior color. However adding factory accessories, unless the car was a very very low mile untouched original would probably enhance the value of the car.  I restored my Dad's original high mile original paint original black interior and added several factory options like the power vent windows am fm radio wood steering wheels factory air conditioning (yes the car was from Connecticut and my Dad was on a limited budget!) and finned valve covers, and a couple of other options

Edited by dr914 (see edit history)

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3 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

Won't happen. The cars are a liability. Please yourself first. You can increase the value of a car. After 50 years my rule of thumb is "For every extra $1,000 I am willing to spend on a car, I can get $4,000 worth of someone else's work." And that has been holding true for 30 years or more.

 

If you paint a car an keep it for, say, 10 years. And, like in my area, drive it once a day for 6 months of the year, you will walk up to the car and look back walking away about 3560 times. You can say to yourself "I really like that car in my favorite color." OR you can say "That next owner is going to be so happy the car is the original color, I can't wait to see how happy he is."

 

And I always look back with a smile. I also notice if I left the light s when I do that, saves on the battery.

Bernie

Bernie, certainly please yourself first. After all, as the owner you are paying the bills. I please myself while keeping an eye open for resale. I would never sell ice to Eskimos because it is not a good deal for the Eskimos. I have been told in the past that I could sell ice to Eskimos. A car is an expense not an investment at least as far as I’m concerned. If the new prospect thinks buying my beautiful 1963 Riviera is an investment and he can get a return then I’m happy for him.

In the mean time I post it notes in the car reminding me to turn off the engine and the lights before I get out. :-)

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