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ch1929

Lost: Henry Ford Punch Bowl

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What would the value be today? One SUV in exchange for the first and only trophy Henry Ford won in auto racing dose not seem like enough. The sad part is it was probably destroyed years ago.

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Worse than a needle in a haystack. No inscription or other identifying marks. I'd say this one's lost to the sands of time forever. Or broken and in the trash 40 years ago.

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Nice. I must admit, that a part of me wanted to say something like "Again???", as I have read of this several times over the years. But then again, hope does spring eternal, and the Bullitt Mustang was a nice segue into the search. It really would be nice if the punch bowl could be found and positively identified. It truly does represent a turning point in history. It would be nice if it could be revered  as such.

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I suspect the punch-bowl trophy is still around.

After all, it was sold from the Ford estate around 1951,

and good-quality things like that tend to be kept.

 

It's probably resting quietly in some attic or hutch,

being given little thought.  If only the word gets out---

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I find the bowl very unattractive and wouldnt be surprised if it was tossed in the trash in the 60's..........................................................................!

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---But the person who bought it from a noted auction house

obviously thought the punch bowl had appeal.

 

Some day, whether 2 or 52 years from now, we may be reading

about the rediscovery---

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I agree with John S... but also think it was an "off the shelf" item, maybe good quality cut glass but one of dozens, if not hundreds, of the same design. Unless it comes with a sales slip from the shop that bought it in 1951, finding it is pretty much impossible.

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The person who bought it liked it for sure. But when they passed away their kids probably either threw it away or used it as a dog bowl.

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Sold at an estate garage sale for twenty bucks.

All provenance lost and indeed probably in some ones hutch somewhere and the owner has no clue.

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I tend to agree with Brass and Jack. First of all, it probably was an "off the shelf item". It wasn't engraved in any way and over time if it wasn't documented in any way, it might be in someones basement. I'm sure once this article is read by the public, several of those "punch bowls" will come out of the closet and the owners will swear up and down that this is the missing Ford Trophy. As with any collectable, documentation is a must!

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8 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

I suspect the punch-bowl trophy is still around.

After all, it was sold from the Ford estate around 1951,

and good-quality things like that tend to be kept.

 

It's probably resting quietly in some attic or hutch,

being given little thought.  If only the word gets out---

Well if takes double digit years too find it I probably won’t be around but if I am I doubt I will remember why  I wanted to see it.  LOL 

Dave S 

 

 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)

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54 minutes ago, 46 woodie said:

I tend to agree with Brass and Jack. First of all, it probably was an "off the shelf item". It wasn't engraved in any way and over time if it wasn't documented in any way, it might be in someones basement. I'm sure once this article is read by the public, several of those "punch bowls" will come out of the closet and the owners will swear up and down that this is the missing Ford Trophy. As with any collectable, documentation is a must!

 

Ford Motor Company has been looking for the "trophy" for years. I am sure it has been like Pawn Stars, American Pickers and Fast n Loud all rolled into one. 

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I had to take out one of my books on Ford on this one. Ole Henrys car was rated at 26 HP. Alexander Winton's car was 40 horses. Henri Fournier's car was 60 HP and William Vanderbilt's car had 40 HP also. Fournier and Vanderbilt dropped out the day before the race. Winton's sales manager Charles Shanks and the race committee all knew that Ford didn't have a chance, so they let Shanks pick out the trophy that was perfectly sized to fit in the bay window of Winton's mansion. The race committee actually shortened the race from 25 laps to ten, because they thought the race fans would be bored watching Winton lap Henry. As they say, "Don't Count Your Chickens Until They Are Hatched". The book makes no mention of what Henry did with the trophy.

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I think you need to re-read Sidney Olsen's (sp ?) book  " Young Henry Ford" , which was written as many researchers and archivists were sorting the vast mass of material that Mr and Mrs Ford had collected,  and which gradually filled most of the rooms in their final home during their twilight years.   It is significant that while most reporters who wanted to interview Mr Ford had great difficulty gleaning and recording much of genuine depth or significance;  because they just did not understand how to communicate with him, or to ask him the right sort of questions.  And everything that he collected was there because it had significance to him.  I suggest to you that the most important skill is to teach how to ask oneself questions that are definitive.   And the most clever interviewer and reporter, a very perceptive young person, schoolgirl reporter and photographer Ann Hood, was able to elicit from Mr Ford information and opinion of what was most important to him.  And you can bet that punchbowl trophy was more significant to Mr Ford than the car he built to win the race, or the insignificant prize-money, no matter whether people considered it artistic or ugly.   The car and the race win brought the public esteem and financial support which assisted him to move towards his ultimate objective;  though the actual form of that first production car was probably not clear in his  mind.  Olsen reported that Mrs Ford did not greatly admire the trophy;  and wondered to a friend what possible  place  or use there might be for it.

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Visited a water front farm in Maryland. They had an outhouse that was supposedly used by George Washington. Now that's a collectible!

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As Ivan states,  Mrs. Ford did not like the punch bowl trophy. That about sums it up. If Clara Ford wasn't happy, Henry heard about it. She probably gave the trophy away, possibly even to one of their servants. From what I have read Mrs. Ford ran Fairlane like Henry ran the business. If she didn't like something, it was out. During the restoration of Fairlene ,one of the rooms that Mrs. Ford had painted over was hand stripped of paint to get back to the wood panels. Henry loved the intricate woodwork but she didn't so guess who won out.

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We've been surmising that the punch-bowl trophy

was not engraved;  but could it have been?  

I suspect it would have been etched or engraved,

to make it a special prize for the event.  No major

event gives generic, anonymous trophies, and

engraved items were even more common back then.

 

 

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2 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

We've been surmising that the punch-bowl trophy

was not engraved;  but could it have been?  

I suspect it would have been etched or engraved,

to make it a special prize for the event.  No major

event gives generic, anonymous trophies, and

engraved items were even more common back then.

 

 

 

The Fords seem pretty sure this trophy had no marks of engraving. Remember there had not been many automobile races at this point and there was no "normal".

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What was standard form back then for horse races? Were they engraved, glass or metal, or just ribbons? Bob 

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1 minute ago, 1937hd45 said:

What was standard form back then for horse races? Were they engraved, glass or metal, or just ribbons? Bob 

Cash !  True horse guys only cared about green stuff, except for the Triple Crown races. 

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4 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

What was standard form back then for horse races? Were they engraved, glass or metal, or just ribbons? Bob 

 

Silver cups and platters same as today. Here are some examples. Calumet Farms trophy room and the Kentucky Derby trophy.

390933941c66d4d80d6eeec4a3004741.jpg

img-news-derby-trophy_152719113253.jpg

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