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     I think it is the real deal, body plate and all.

 

     They have mistaken the Bendix pre-selector shifter for an automatic. I think that is what they are called. It is visible in an interior photo, and has the correct Lycoming V-8 engine.

                     Jim43

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Didn´t see any sedans.

The Glenn Pray replicas had Corvair flat sixes, the 1969 Cord Royale I saw 48 years ago had a Chrysler 440 V-8 in it. This car does not have either of those. Maybe someone knowledgeable about Cords could look at the photos and tell us what´s wrong with it. I can´t find anything, except  maybe the engine compartment is too perfect. The correct outside-sourced Lycoming V-8 appears to be in the car.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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To bid on CoPart you need to either be a licensed wrecker, a licensed dealer (I think) or you need to pay one to act on your behalf (as a "broker").

 

CoPart info on bidding - 

 

Submit Business Licenses or Find a Broker

 

Many vehicles require specific business licenses to buy. But that doesn’t mean that Members without the appropriate documentation have to rule these items out. Instead, these buyers may consider enlisting the help of a Broker.

What Brokers Can Do for You

Brokers help you purchase vehicles you may not otherwise qualify for. They’re also available to answer questions you may have about the auction process and connect you with transportation services if needed. Some Brokers have a physical location, or storefront, for you to visit. You can bid and buy via these Brokers’ computer kiosks, and get assistance from experienced staff on hand.

How to Find a Broker

Copart provides a list of Brokers for your convenience, but it’s best to first find your vehicle, place a preliminary bid and then get notified that you need a Broker. Not all Brokers can facilitate purchases of all vehicles.

A Final Word about Brokers

Brokers are independent of Copart. When you use a Broker, you are buying vehicles through the Broker and not Copart. Members who elect to work with a Broker to bid on vehicles are advised to carefully read and understand the Broker’s terms and conditions, including payment terms and conditions. You should also review the Broker’s qualifications thoroughly to ensure that the Broker meets your vehicle purchasing needs.

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The front seats are not original.  Otherwise the rest of the car looks to be period correct so I would say real car.  60-70k for a water damaged but complete real 810 Phaeton feels about right.  But without inspecting the car in person,  you don't know how bad it is.

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This is a real Cord , for sure.  Someone had it insured for big bucks, guessing it was in the Texas flooding, owner collected insurance money but either couldn't or didn't buy car back at salvage value.

 

Pictures look good, but don't tell the story.  If this car was submerged, even partially, in salt or brackish water, then there are things corroding as we speak, and it would need a complete tear down/restoration.  I agree with alsancle, 60K as is, and that would be a good buy for someone who could do some of the work themselves.  The fact that it's a cabriolet helps the value.

 

The "salvage" title will hurt it's value in the long run, too.  I don't know the legality, but a new title would be money ahead if someone bought that car.

Edited by trimacar (see edit history)
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12 hours ago, RansomEli said:

Something is funny. The auction company estimates the retail value of the car at $1,000. 

 

High bid is $23K.

 

 

 

The estimate is usually put in by the insurance company when they enter the assignment, not the auction.  When I enter estimates on cars I deal with, sometimes I just put a place holder in the field until I actually have the total loss report figured.  If I forget to go back and change it, it will say something whatever I entered as the placeholder.  The auction site's software I use requires me to enter a value whether I know it at the time of assignment or not.

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9 hours ago, Dave Mellor NJ said:

Copart has a way of running auctions  that if they don't get the expected price after a certain time they start over. This car was previously up to about 45K .

 

Copart doesn't own the cars, the insurance companies do.  If an insurance company sets a reserve, copart has no dog in the fight.  They just report to the insurance company what the bid was and the insurance tells them to sell it or re-run the auction,

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8 hours ago, mike6024 said:

To bid on CoPart you need to either be a licensed wrecker, a licensed dealer (I think) or you need to pay one to act on your behalf (as a "broker").

 

 

 

Copart is very much like eBay, anyone can bid on almost any car after properly creating an account.  My brother bought a truck from copart.  We have insureds buy their own vehicles back from Copart.  They decline our offer to retain the vehicle thinking they can get it cheaper in the auction.  Sometimes they do.

Edited by 39BuickEight (see edit history)
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Amazing one in this apparent condition wouldn't be bought back, unless the owner knew it was in brackish water and everything would go to crap right away.   Maybe they are very wealthy as well and just didn't care as they had many other things to consume their time after the flood and this was the least of their concerns. 

 

Seems a shame t see it sitting their open to the weather.   Doesn't look like the flood may have been really deep.  There is no moisture in the gauges and as mentioned that engine compartment looks nearly spotless.  Wouldn't you see an oil line / sediment ring on everything for how high the water got.  We always did when a boat sunk. I'm not sure if that's what they are trying to show in the side door photo with the door shut. Fresh water flood and this could be a real buy especially if it didn't get very high and the buyer could do the disassemble and rehab themselves.

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, trimacar said:

This is a real Cord , for sure.  Someone had it insured for big bucks, guessing it was in the Texas flooding, owner collected insurance money but either couldn't or didn't buy car back at salvage value.

 

Pictures look good, but don't tell the story.  If this car was submerged, even partially, in salt or brackish water, then there are things corroding as we speak, and it would need a complete tear down/restoration.  I agree with alsancle, 60K as is, and that would be a good buy for someone who could do some of the work themselves.  The fact that it's a cabriolet helps the value.

 

The "salvage" title will hurt it's value in the long run, too.  I don't know the legality, but a new title would be money ahead if someone bought that car.

 

"Washing" a flood title is a big legal NO NO. All the cars numbers were listed on the auction. I am sure folks that know these car have written them down. It will be known as a flood car forever. Not that it couldn't be fixed and enjoyed.

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I think the Cabriolet is a 25% premium apples to apples over the Phaeton. Maybe a little more.   If you could get this car for under 75k I think you would be fine (assuming it is not 10x worse than it seems).  A complete barn find needing everything Cabriolet is worth 45-50k and this feels better.   Of course,  I'm saying that based on Phaetons.  I have not seen a Cab barn find in years.

 

I do not believe a salvage title on a collectible car has the same negative value that it does with an every day car.  

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7 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

I don't know what is wrong with me.  You are correct,  I amend my 60-70k estimate to be 80-90k.

Gracious, does that mean I have to change my agreement with you too!?!?

 

Yes, worth a little more as a cabriolet, those are much scarcer than the phaeton.  Wonder how many other antique flood cars are out there.  Most of the flood water was pushed up from the Gulf, so at best it was probably brackish (slightly salty, fresh mixed with salty water).  Bet you need new paint, upholstery, and some chrome.  That said, not much chrome on a Cord.

 

I have a friend who is a used car dealer in central Louisiana. He said for MONTHS after the flooding in Texas, it was difficult to buy any used car for resale, the demand was so great with people having drowned cars and looking for transportation.

Edited by trimacar (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Big question still remains.  Fresh or salt water flood.  Salt water seems like it would have left a film on everything.  The only thing I see a film on is the one hubcap. 

Or, Heaven forbid, sewage water, which isn't out of the realm of possibilities when floods occur.

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Don't get your hopes up on this one. A friend has been pursuing it, and it has been discouraging. The storage lot is a sea of mud, they move the cars around with forklifts, windows are down on the cars, there was a multi-day hard freeze recently, it's now been five months since Hurricane Harvey, and my friend was not allowed in to see the car. So no one knows how bad the damage is by now.   

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  • 1 month later...
34 minutes ago, 39BuickEight said:

Copart doesn't reveal sales prices.  (I have a login there for work and still can't get it).  I'm not sure why they don't, because the other salvage yards and wholesale auction companies do. 

Almost seems like ethically they would have to for someone like yourself and not the general public as there could be some fishy bidding going on and one would never be able to contest there higher bid wasn't honored.  Maybe that's the plan?  Not even on just this car but think about the thousands if not 100's of thousands they process a year.

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I had a membership at Copart, never used it. I had to inspect a few cars in there for a auto inspection company that worked with insurance companies. I think they are geared to work with salvage yards, that bid on the cars to repair them, or part them out. Seems like the Cord would be an easy sell. Also seems like the value of it goes down with every rain storm, fork lift transfer, flood, careless workers and homeless rodents. 

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