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Steeldraulic brake relining


29hupp
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Any competent  full service brake place should be able to reline the brakes if not as new at least close.  As in the pdf's, the linings should be in two pieces with different  cof for leading and trailing shoes.  Any other lining method gives you a harder pedal and not the same stopping power.  Mine were done with all one kind of lining and when that wasn't satisfactory the shop took the riveted linings off and  put on bonded linings, still unsatisfactory.   Watch ebay and other sources for linings.  After looking for 55 years in total including 15 years on ebay I bought a NOS set of Steeldraulic linings two years ago.  There are still some out there.

I shopped around and found a shop that knew about soft and hard and cof and my brakes were back like they should be.  With my linings I can stop at night from 50 mph within the range of my headlights.  A reline usually last me about 80,000 miles.

Good luck with finding someone who is knowledgeable about brakes and is not just a parts replacer.  The shop I dealt with is gone now as the owner was promoted to the big brake shop in the sky.  A small shop in a smaller town is where I found the answer.

Edited by Guest (see edit history)
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No resources but some further information.  28-31 Ford linings are the right thickness and width (at least for my Pontiac) but are very soft.  You can press your thumb nail into the surface.  The proper Steeldraulic shoes are hard (real hard) you can not make a mark on them even squeezing them with slip joint pliers. Photo is of the nos set that fits my car.

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My drums are the original pressed steel that came with the car.  After 500,000 miles they show negligible wear.  There was a reason the designing engineers specified hard lining.  I have had both on my car and the soft linings make the pedal pressure three or four times higher.  Soft is better than no linings but negate all the original features of "Midland Steeldraulic Brakes" which were used by a variety of manufacturers, some of them on quite high priced automobiles.

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Marv is a good guy to deal with.  I have bought a few things from him and have always had great service.

29hupp...go with the hard lining, you will not regret it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was just discussing steeldraulics  with some friends last night. One of my friends has  them on his Durant  he tells me that he has awful trouble with them staying adjusted. He will adjust them up and they are great  and then  50 miles later they are out of adjustment. He says his  friends with them suffer the same problem- Do you have the solution ? Karl 

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They must have done something wrong.  Whether I had the correct linings or the wrong linings once the are adjusted properly they should be good for 10,000 or more miles and then just need a click or two to tighten the front shoes up.  When I was putting a thousand miles a month on my car I would adjust the front brakes twice a year and the rears maybe every third time I did the fronts.  It's been this way for 58 years. 

If they are having that much problem they need to go back to the basic set up starting at the cross shaft and working out exactly as the manual says.  The very crucial adjustment is the free play at the toggle.  People either don't understand how the toggle or a scissor jack works.  There is no mechanical advantage until the cable has pulled the toggle a third of the way in.  Then you start multiplying the pedal force and have fantastic brakes.

Everyone that I have met in person except one has always tried to adjust the brakes starting at the shoes/drums and using hydraulic brake clearances.  The one that didn't knew nothing about Midland Steeldraulic Brakes and followed the manual exactly when he was reassembling his Nash.  He had very good brakes but it was difficult for him to adjust them at the shoes because he didn't have the proper adjusting pliers.  I gave him my spare ones, he spent an hour adjusting them exactly and had perfect brakes.  Drove his car around here, drove Route 66 and back and had no brake problems at all.

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