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Another 1918 E49


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On ‎25‎/‎01‎/‎2018 at 11:49 AM, ROD W said:

Terry,,   Anything is possible.  You learn new things on this Forum every day,  It says Vin Number ( don,t know if that is engine or frame number)  355397

 

1918 model numbers start at 343783 so this is an early production 1918 car built in 1917 - so all are right!  Intro date was August '17  - maybe built about a month or two into the run -  11,000th of about 120,000.

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On ‎1‎/‎24‎/‎2018 at 5:35 PM, ROD W said:

  Looks a pretty nice,  complete,  original  E49,  On Ebay.   Location   Pennsylvania,   Ph  724 984 1659

 There have been a few 1918,s up for sale recently

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Rod:

 I tried to download all the photos from the ebay ad for one of my many early Buick reference files I keep on original cars. It would only download the first one you show. It did let me copy the description to WORD and save that. I was able to copy/paste the other 4 you posted in the usual  manner.

 At this time 10:52  1/27/18 it shows 25 bids  up to $7,500 with reserve not met. It says it is located in Uniontown PA.  My old stomping grounds but 3 hours away.

Larry

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6 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:
Look what the latest bidder did. It was 7500 and he bid 9999 so he was winning with maybe 7600 or something. Then he bid again with above 9999 that made his first offer jump to 9999.
 
Oops.

eBay doesn't work that way.  What likely happened is that his first bid was $9999.99 or more.  Someone else bid $9999.99, so his bid was bumped up to match it.  Only the high bid shows, so you don't see that $9999.99 bid.  In fact, if that bid is cancelled, the price will drop back to $7600.

 

Example: If there is an item with an opening price of $1, and you submit two bids of $2 and $3, you will get the item for $1 if you are the only bidder.  If someone else submits a bid for $1.50, you'll pay $1.50 -- but you won't see that $1.50 bid because only the high bid is displayed.

Edited by KongaMan (see edit history)
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46 minutes ago, Morgan Wright said:

No, it's not.  Only the high bids are shown.  The intermediate bid of $9,999 was never the high bid, so it doesn't get shown -- but it does move the mark.

 

Try it yourself.  Bid $10,100 and see what happens.

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If I bid 10,100 his high bid will jump to 10,200 and his first bid will stay 9999 because that was what he bid, just as I said before.

 

If he cancels his high bid, his first bid will drop to 7600

 

  Bid Amount Bid Time
l***c(53) $9,999.99 29 Jan 2018 at 4:44:23AM PST
l***c(53) $9,999.99 29 Jan 2018 at 4:41:10AM PST
2***4(800) $7,500.00 25 Jan 2018 at 10:55:42AM PST
p***a(128) $7,500.00 26 Jan 2018 at 4:06:13PM PST
8***c(118) $7,200.00 26 Jan 2018 at 6:22:37AM PST
0***2(105) $7,000.00 25 Jan 2018 at 5:07:43PM PST
g***g(1115) $6,560.00 25 Jan 2018 at 1:57:29PM PST
2***4(800) $6,500.00 24 Jan 2018 at 6:29:51PM PST
g***g(1115) $6,360.00 25 Jan 2018 at 1:57:26PM PST
t***o(505) $6,160.00 24 Jan 2018 at 6:14:22PM PST
k***n(136) $6,060.00 24 Jan 2018 at 3:17:13PM PST
2***4(800) $6,000.00 24 Jan 2018 at 5:24:38AM PST
b***a(65) $5,800.00 24 Jan 2018 at 7:02:10AM PST
7***a(64) $5,600.00 23 Jan 2018 at 6:11:01PM PST
2***4(800) $5,500.00 24 Jan 2018 at 5:22:55AM PST
j***o(476) $5,100.00 23 Jan 2018 at 3:46:18PM PST
7***a(64) $5,100.00 23 Jan 2018 at 6:10:58PM PST
7***a(64) $4,800.00 23 Jan 2018 at 6:10:54PM PST
2***4(800) $4,500.00 23 Jan 2018 at 11:59:16AM PST
e***g(398) $4,200.00 23 Jan 2018 at 1:57:47PM PST
e***g(398) $3,800.00 23 Jan 2018 at 1:57:16PM PST
7***a(64) $3,333.33 23 Jan 2018 at 8:48:14AM PST
k***a(629) $3,000.00 23 Jan 2018 at 9:39:32AM PST
w***o(596) $2,600.00 23 Jan 2018 at 6:30:31AM PST
2***2(59) $2,500.00 22 Jan 2018 at 11:05:37PM PST
c***u(2595) $2,000.00 22 Jan 2018 at 9:21:41PM PST
y***d(1087) $1,918.18 22 Jan 2018 at 8:48:51PM PST
Starting Price $1,918.00 22 Jan 2018 at 7:28:32PM PST
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No. You cannot outbid yourself.   His first bid could have been $15,000.  It shows as $9999.99 because that's as high as it needed to go to be the high bid.  His second bid is higher than his first (e.g. $17,000) which is why it's also listed.  If he cancels either bid, he will still be the high bidder at $9999.99.  If the unlisted mystery bidder retracts his bid, the high bid will be $7600, and there will be two bids at that level.

 

Again, place a bid for $10,100 and see what happens.  You can guess or you can know. Your choice. ;)

Edited by KongaMan (see edit history)
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Upon further review, it looks like this was a reserve auction.  The reserve was $9999.99.  The high bidder placed two bids exceeding that amount.  Therefore, they were both bumped up to match the reserve.  If either bid is cancelled, the high bid will still be $9999.99.

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I am sure most  people on this forum have bought on Ebay..  But for those not familiar with how it works,   its probably good to start on a low priced item to get comfortable with the bidding  process.  I bought this light for my 1912 a few weeks back as I only had one headlight.  It has taken two years to find a  light,  so I now have a matching pair.   

The previous high bid was $149.   I placed a bid of $300 but the highest bid came up as $150.  If somebody had placed a bid higher than $300 it would have jumped up to $301.  I got the light for $150 even though my high bid was $300.   In cases where I really want an item  I will be ready to increase my high bid 10 or 5 seconds before the auction ends as this is the time when prices can change very quickly,  jumping to peoples high bids.

SAM_0046.JPG

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19 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

Upon further review, it looks like this was a reserve auction.  The reserve was $9999.99.  The high bidder placed two bids exceeding that amount.  Therefore, they were both bumped up to match the reserve.  If either bid is cancelled, the high bid will still be $9999.99.

 

Oh yeah, I didn't think of that. 9999 reserve. got it.

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I have no idea about the market value of these cars, but this one is complete, unrestored, and the engine turns.  IMHO, those are all strong selling points.  That is, it's much better than spending years on a parts hunt (if you even know what you need) and God know how much time just getting to first base on the engine.  Did the buyer overpay?  I dunno, but even if market value is half of what he paid, you might make an argument he could still be well ahead of the game given the time and money he's saving.

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I guessed it would go for $12k so not too far off. 

 

My offer would have been $10k, just one man’s thought / wallet if I were looking. 

 

Looks very complete and untouched. 

 

evilBay tends to be a sellers market for items like this so the price is not a surprise.  

 

What did the seller pay in commission?  I’m not that familiar with that part of eBay. 

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This car is "interesting" to me.

I have been in this hobby for a long time. In that time  have seen the hobby and restoration go from a reasonable endeavor to one that almost makes no sense from a financial perspective. Especially for a car like this.

While it is a wonderful car, unless you are in a "cost is no object" position, making it a presentable car will cost more than it is worth by far. Even if you can do most of the work yourself.

 

My '38 Special was bought 40+ years ago for almost nothing and it was complete. It sat for a very long time.

I did everything myself in my garage except for painting, upholstery and plating. I even used to do my own painting, but I cannot anymore - I did do all the body work. Boring the engine was farmed out too, nothing else.

The cost of stuff necessary for completion brings what it cost me to very near its current worth.

 

As it is said, just my 2¢ worth.

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Yeah, unfortunately restoration is not a pursuit that makes financial sense in the overwhelming majority of cases.  You better enjoy what you're doing and really want what you've got, because that's your payoff.

 

My opinion is that you try to mitigate this by buying the most desirable car that you want and can afford, as much of the work is a fixed cost irrespective of model.  That is, it doesn't cost any more to paint a Century than a Special, or to rebuild a 322 as opposed to a 248.  And don't settle for one that's almost what you want, because once you've written the first check, you're paying out the same amount of money as you go along.  You're going to missing the car you don't have longer than you'll be missing the money it would have taken to buy it.

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Original   unrestored cars are becoming popular now,  and people will pay more for one in good condition,  which is evident in this case.  For me this is a hobby.  I don,t keep a record of what I spend. 

 I don,t play golf.  I don.t smoke.  I don,t go on overseas holidays.   Any of these other pursuits  could easily add up to more than many of us spend on our cars

But,   if I was buying another car I would prefer to buy this one for $8500.  Even though it does have an Isuzu engine.  He still has the original  engine,  which could be  easily put back in.

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Edited by ROD W (see edit history)
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Konga Man and Rod W have good points. 2 of my cars are restored 2 are original.

My '18 Buick is kind of original. I have owned it for 50 years. Up until 8 years ago when I reupholstered it, all that had been done  through the years is maintain it. However that upholstery job cost nearly what itis worth.  It was reupholstered because we used it and the original was just falling apart.

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 I hope that the car goes to a good home, it deserves as much. At least the reserve wasn't 50% more, or even double the $9999, as some people get very unrealistic expectations of the values.

 If, if, if, I might of made a run at it myself, but paying USD in Can., gets really expensive these days, apart from the uncertainty the engine.

 Also, there are so many so called reality TV car shows, where they buy a car cheap(ish), spend some $ on it, and flip it for a handsome profit, which makes the uninitiated think that its' easy to do this. And that parts are just a few clicks of the mouse away.

 My personal experience, and that of most people I talk to is quite the opposite.

 Keith

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Some time ago, the Las Vegas Pawn Shop guys bought a crappy 1918 Buick E-45 for too much money. Later it was for sale. I'm sure they didnt recover what they paid. I think I saw it on E Bay for sald.

 

This car is really nice. If it were me, I'd just clean it, get it running (yes, I would drop the pan and lap the valves) and enjoy it as is. However, with use that upholstery is probably going to turn to dust.

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Getting back to the question of eBay fees.  Cars are actually pretty cheap to sell on there.  There is about 150.00 listing fee if you opt for the extra photos and a reserve.  That's it,  unless you use pay pal for a deposit,  then pay pal fees apply on the deposit.  There is no final value fee.  Years ago,  there used to be.  It's actually pretty good bang for your buck for exposure.  Often a car will sell after the auction because of the auction. 

I have many gripes with eBay,  especially being I make my living selling on there,  but the car sales part is one of their better deals.  Now when they figure out how to collect 15% of the cost of shipping a car,  then we will have a real problem,  like they do with all their other auctions. 

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I consider eBay to be an advertising venue rather than a sales channel.  if something sells, so much the better -- but I do more business from follow-up inquiries than from direct sales.

 

I can't imagine using eBay as your primary (or sole) revenue stream.  They're becoming increasingly restrictive and regimented with respect to the format and content of listings, and they're skewed heavily towards the buyer (e.g. If a bidder stiffs you on a deal, you can't leave negative feedback.  WTF?).

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Hi all.I own the Pawnstar car.They paid 17000.00 for it. They screwed up the fuel system and brakes and parked it. I paid 9500.00for it and in a half hour had it running. The brake linkage was all ot of adjustment and needed relining.It cost 200.00 to reline. The car runs unbelievable even in Vegas summers. It's a very tight car body and drive line. I go to breakfast with the model t club and they are amazed how smooth the moter is. Mike

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16 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Getting back to the question of eBay fees.  Cars are actually pretty cheap to sell on there.  There is about 150.00 listing fee if you opt for the extra photos and a reserve.  That's it,  unless you use pay pal for a deposit,  then pay pal fees apply on the deposit.  There is no final value fee.  Years ago,  there used to be.  It's actually pretty good bang for your buck for exposure.  Often a car will sell after the auction because of the auction. 

I have many gripes with eBay,  especially being I make my living selling on there,  but the car sales part is one of their better deals.  Now when they figure out how to collect 15% of the cost of shipping a car,  then we will have a real problem,  like they do with all their other auctions. 

 

Thanks for the info on car sales. 

 

My brother-in-law is a music teacher. He buys used student beginner type instruments from parents and garage sales etc , all year long, checks them out and then doubles his money on eBay all summer long. 

 

Years ago ago I bought a Jeep from an eBay seller that never got any decent offers. I contacted him after his post expired.  Got a great deal on a great Willys

Edited by Brian_Heil
typo (see edit history)
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Mike,

I'm glad to hear that you got a real deal from those "pro" scalpers!

 

There is a WHOLE lot of difference between your Buick and those  T Fords.  I am not putting the T's down, they did cost less that 1/2 of what the Buick cost.

 

 

I hope you enjoy the Buick

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An old time friend of mine who owned a beautiful all original 1923 Model 45 Buick used to tell me that a T model Ford was almost a half step better than walking.  I'll never forget him and the stories he would tell about how it was back in the depression.

 

Terry Wiegand

Doo Dah America

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Here is a cut and paste of Model T prices (Runabout, but there is a 1925 Touring called out at $290 below too)  off of Wikipedia. 

 

Believe my 1923 Model 45 Buick list for $1050 so closer to 3 times the price of a T.

 

And I ran across this 1924 Chevrolet ad which was more of a direct Model T competitor.

 

 

1924 Chevy

 

 

Year Production Price for
Runabout
Notes
1909 10,666 $825 [50] $22,500 in 2017. Touring car was $850.
1910 19,050 $900 $21,717 in 2015-prices[49]
1911 34,858 $680  
1912 68,773 $590  
1913 170,211 $525  
1914 202,667 $440 Fiscal year was only 10 months long due to change in end date from September 30 to July 31
1915 308,162 $390  
1916 501,462 $345 [51]
1917 735,020 $500 $33,000 in 2015-prices[49]
1918 664,076 $500  
1919 498,342 $500  
1920 941,042 $395 Production for fiscal year 1920, (August 1, 1919 through July 31, 1920). Price was $550 in March but dropped by September
1920 463,451 $395 Production for balance of calendar year, August 1 through December 31. Total '1920' production (17 months) = 1,404,493
1921 971,610 $325 Price was $370 in June but dropped by September
1922 1,301,067 $319  
1923 2,011,125 $364  
1924 1,922,048 $265  
1925 1,911,705 $260 or $300 ($14,000 in 2016).[52] ($3,630 in 2017)[dubious discuss] Touring car was $290
1926 1,554,465 $360  
1927 399,725 $360 Production ended before mid-year to allow retooling for the Model A
  14,689,525  

Overall total

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  • 1 month later...

Well, here she is...

Thank you Terry and Larry for not 'stealing my thunder'.

Fresh out of the container this morning, having crossed the Atlantic Ocean to start her new adventures in the UK.

Coming to join my E-6-45 which Terry knows well and on which we've just completed a 350 mile tour to Wales from Oxford last week-end.

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