David Fertig

1930 Ford Convertible

Recommended Posts

1930 Ford.  I was told this is a convertible.  It's not a roadster.   Has roll up windows but no window frame to the door.  Body is fairly solid.  Fenders have dents and tears.  Motor and trans are in car.  Wood is so-so.  No top bows.  Please ask questions.

 

Asking $6000.  Will hold for Carlisle or Hershey with deposit.

 

Also mechanical parts - motor, trans, axles, etc.  Would like to do a package deal on that.  Email me and I can get you pictures of what all is there.

DSCN6757.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see posts for the top so it's probably a cabriolet but we need to see more pics of the side and interior. If it's a cabriolet in fair shape you shouldn't have trouble getting 6K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a cabriolet. it is well worth what you are asking. I have a similar one and was asking a little more and surprisingly, had no takers. So I am going through it and keeping it.

 

these have a fair amount of wood and not for the faint of heart to restore, but are great cars year round, because of the roll up windows.

 

ps, if you have any of the top components, should mention that, as the parts are quite expensive and hard to come by.

Edited by mercer09 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll post more pics as soon as I can get to my laptop.  In my opinion, this car is good enough to restore or certainly a good car to hot rod.  Ford guys will know better than me about parts availability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cabs are cool as they have some of the niceties closed cars have.  Outside of the top components their isnt an easier prewar car to get parts for.  Still popular with stock and hot rodders as well.  Seems very fairly priced, GLWS.  

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope these help.  If you need more or something specific, let me know. 

 

There is a set of seat springs in the back that I assume was for a rumble seat.  Otherwise, what you see is what I have.

DSCN6148.JPG

DSCN6155.JPG

DSCN6156.JPG

DSCN6157.JPG

DSCN6160.JPG

DSCN6161.JPG

DSCN6162.JPG

DSCN6153.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but generally there is not going to be much interest.  

 

 

 

Im sorry, but would very much disagree with this statement.

 

My phone rang off the hook.

 

Model As in general are the first stop for many car collectors. entry level yes, but incredible that you can buy pretty much any part for. Not part of the orphan club. and cabs are on the top of the list......................

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"You can have as much fun with a Model A as with a Model J", at least that's what my pal alsancle tells me and he's a pretty smart dude.  I largely agree with him. ☺

 

I think the point is, these cars offer prewar experience, reasonable usability compared to the older stuff, unbeat support and parts, and a ready market.  Flip is a strong supply so you need the right buyer for a project car, but I would argue a rust free A, unlike other less supported cars of the era. Can be fairly predictable in terms of restoration costs if one does some simple research.  This can looks like a nice start to me.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger FWIW what I like about this one are trouble spots typical to these cars look rock solid on this unit, lower cowl in front of doors and rear quarters just behind the doors look real nice.  Just thought I would pass along, not sure if you have any experience with the A before. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve no I do not, but I like cars like this to restore.  Thank you for the information, I like projects, but don't like huge hidden surprises, like broken axles that have been welded together or JB welded.  I have been burned a couple times, but not many, its a great hobby. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

 

if the axle was bad for example, I junked a perfectly good one 3 months ago, because I couldnt give it away and needed the room. same with engines. If it is bad, easier to find another and pop it in.

 

that is why A's are sooooooooooo cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a good, complete, front axle for an A, $100 and the seller was tickled pink.  A friend's Model A panel delivery was being winched onto a truck, the winch was driven off a PTO, PTO did not disengage so the front axle looked sort of like the wishbones.

 

Parts are plentiful, well documented what part goes where.  This seems like a fair buy, maybe not a smoking buy, but easy to compare restoration cost (as mentioned) versus buying one running and driving...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, like it or not nice cars are routinely hot rodded, but that also makes for a good  supply of restored parts.  Unless one is hung up on dated parts for a high point car, most mechanical parts are interchangeable 28 - 31.  A complete engined rebuild is under 4 grand, done by a pro like Schwalm in PA for example.  This would be a great 50s ztyle hop up but an even better restoration! ☺

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now