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1922 Fiat 501 Targa Florio


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RE: the Australian Border Force & Asbestos......................this is simply amazing. I know you have mentioned this before Bernie, but not to the detail of the last couple of posts. A government mandate run amuck! (Believe me, Australia is not alone in that!!)

 

I hope "someone" in the government doesn't get the idea "Hey, what about all these old asbestos-containing cars that are already in Australia? Shouldn't we clean those up too?"

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2 hours ago, r1lark said:

RE: the Australian Border Force & Asbestos......................this is simply amazing. I know you have mentioned this before Bernie, but not to the detail of the last couple of posts. A government mandate run amuck! (Believe me, Australia is not alone in that!!)

 

I hope "someone" in the government doesn't get the idea "Hey, what about all these old asbestos-containing cars that are already in Australia? Shouldn't we clean those up too?"

There you go Oldcar something else to think about.  Your Lagonda Rapier may not  be safe  even if you do not take it overseas.

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As someone who has been recently diagnosed with mesothelioma, all I can say is you can't be too careful with asbestos. The above may seem extreme, however I am not your traditional asbestos victim who worked for or with any asbestos manufacturer etc. It appears my exposure can only be explained by playing around with old cars.

 

Again, people reading the above may think it's an extreme measure but I assure you once you have been diagnosed with a non cureable cancer of which is only caused by asbestos exposure your attitude changes. Border force go your hardest. The government also needs to alert the population of asbestos exposure in older homes, many people complete renovations without regard to asbestos exposure.

 

Chemotherapy is not fun.......

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On ‎8‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 7:53 AM, OnSafari said:

As someone who has been recently diagnosed with mesothelioma, all I can say is you can't be too careful with asbestos. The above may seem extreme, however I am not your traditional asbestos victim who worked for or with any asbestos manufacturer etc. It appears my exposure can only be explained by playing around with old cars.

 

Again, people reading the above may think it's an extreme measure but I assure you once you have been diagnosed with a non cureable cancer of which is only caused by asbestos exposure your attitude changes. Border force go your hardest. The government also needs to alert the population of asbestos exposure in older homes, many people complete renovations without regard to asbestos exposure.

 

Chemotherapy is not fun.......

 

Hope your treatment goes well On Safari.  For what it is worth I totally agree with your views on asbestos and the efforts of our Australian Border Force. 

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Thank you both, I tend to look at my body frames more as sculpture and as such it is pointless showing you a lump of clay, or even a bundle of steel tubes. These come in six metre lengths.  My bodies are built "free hand" so I cannot even show you a drawing and as every one is different it is no good showing you a frame built for something else. My bodies tend to 'evolve' so even I am not sure what it is going to look like finished. All I can suggest is that you look at a couple of my earlier attempts. To give you some vague idea below is a previous frame in the "making". This one on a 1928 Triumph Super Seven chassis.DSCN5525.thumb.jpg.7f5505e65e78a405672d1f914128f402.jpg

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Meanwhile despite the lack of photographs the work on the body frame is continuing with those six metre lengths of steel tube being cut up and seemingly disappearing as is the contents of my acetylene and oxygen bottles so something is happening. While all this is happening Tony is getting on with upholstering the seats. Sadly my scanner is not good at colours. The close up photograph of the sample of leather  is closer to the actual colour, but still does not show  either the actual colour or texture. We will have to be, as with all things,  just a bit more patient.

 

Bj.

 

DSCN6103.thumb.jpg.13eabb79b574b61cdcc4fc148ff6c9ba.jpg 

 

Bj.

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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I've heard of people using old coat hangers to torch weld, but figured that was sort of an 'old wives tale'. But, I'm sure at least a couple of folks will comment that they used to use coat hangers 'back in the day'. :)

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Good to hear you are progressing along with the body frame Bernie. We will wait patiently until you are ready to 'unveil' it via pictures. :)

 

Based on the other bodies you have built, I have no doubt the wait will be worth it!

 

By the way, it looks like Ron Covell, who is a metal shaper of some reputation in the USA, still utilizes oxy-acetylene welding:  https://www.hotrod.com/articles/oxy-acetylene-welding-101/

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On 8/17/2018 at 7:45 PM, r1lark said:

I've heard of people using old coat hangers to torch weld, but figured that was sort of an 'old wives tale'. But, I'm sure at least a couple of folks will comment that they used to use coat hangers 'back in the day'. :)

I wonder if coat hanger use to be made of softer material? I have heard of torch welding with them but have never witnessed it. Modern metal hangers are darn hard to cut so the alloy must be stiffer. I imagine the older ones were softer steel. 

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1 hour ago, keninman said:

I wonder if coat hanger use to be made of softer material? I have heard of torch welding with them but have never witnessed it. Modern metal hangers are darn hard to cut so the alloy must be stiffer. I imagine the older ones were softer steel. 

 

I would suggest that the difference in "stiffnes" you refer to is that one is annealed wire and the other is not.  I have never used a coat hanger (and I would have to be desperate to do so)  but have used general purpose arc welding rods with the flux removed to get me out of trouble. 

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I may have shocked some of you with the some/all the above but I do tend to have tunnel vision when it comes to my "projects". 
I have quite consciously chosen not to take or show any photographs of the body frame until it is completed or very near to completion. It is not that I am afraid of negative comments I can still get plenty of them but when we come down to the "nitty gritty" there is only one person whose opinion really makes any difference, that is the person who will appear out of no-where in response to a for sale advert I hope to be able to place at some time in the near future. Keep an eye on the "PreWarCar website.

I do not and have never attempted to disguise the fact that the Fiat 501 will be sold on or near completion. 

Historically the sale of my project cars is used to help finance our five yearly holidays in Europe. The best I can suggest is that these "projects" are my personal form of compulsory saving. If I was interested in making a profit I would have to be doing something very different. The best that I can hope for is to recoup some of the money that I have spent. Meanwhile it has kept me entertained and away from drink or wild living.

 

You can go away now or stay around to see how it all works out.

That is up to you.

 

Bernie j.

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Well, I am going to keep hanging around, as long as you keep hanging around Bernie.  ?

 

You provide me inspiration to keep chugging along with my projects.  I may not have the fancy tools or big lift in the garage, but I bumble along.

 

Best,

 

Frank

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On ‎8‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 11:47 PM, oldcar said:

 

You can go away now or stay around to see how it all works out.

That is up to you.

Bernie j.

I believe I'll stick around too. :)

Edited by r1lark
The smiley face showed up as a square the first time........?? (see edit history)
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Seats look beautiful Bernie. Thinking back to the pics you posted of the fabricated seat frames.........how does your trimmer fabricate the seat back and bottoms? Are they basically just foam, or does he use a more 'traditional' method of springs covered with burlap and then foam (or batting) on top of the burlap?

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DSCN6107.thumb.jpg.b6aa5ac2e11e6215d0748405b8d48b22.jpgHello Paul

I hate to disappoint you but like everything I do, I have to work to a budget. Yes I know that those perfectionists among us who would do seat cushions in the manner that you describe. Unfortunately this would mean that the seats would cost anything up to double or even treble the amount. The same applies to the rest of the car. If I sent it to one of the leading restoration specialists it would be very easy to spend $100,000 or more and have a magnificent car as a result. For me there are several problems in doing that.

1. I do not have that much to spend.

2. Even if I did, how much satisfaction would I receive by simply signing a cheque.

3. I would get very bored sittng around waiting for some one else to do all the work.

4. I know a lot of people of my age that spend a huge, to me, amount of money and time going on "Cruises", I cannot think of anything that I would enjoy less.

5. I know a lot of people, perhaps including many who are reading this, who cannot or do not want to understand what it is turns me on as far as my "cars" are concerned. That is OK provided that they do not want to change me.

6. These days in Australia scrap metal is worth almost nothing, in most instances you need to pay the Scrap Dealer to take it away!

7. While I have very nearly finished the body frame, there is still a lot more to be done.

8. I know that I have said this before but this time I really do think that in all probability this will be my last "Basket Case Rescue".

9. I still have the Lagonda Rapier, this has tended to be neglected while I am working on "other things. It is still the best car that I have ever owned.

10. When all else fails I could easily spend all my time in the garden.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, oldcar said:

Hello NZCN

You may be getting confused, Rose Jelinkova is the authour of the V&V article, Elizabeth Junek (Junkova) was a very well known racing driver, particularly of Bugatti pre-WW2. You are correct Madan Junek was a Czech national. The Fiat was her first racing car. There is any amount written about her and her association with Bugatti.

Google may be able to assist you re Rose Jelinkova.

 

Bj.

 

Yes I understand the difference between Liz and Rose. Tried Google for Rose but no luck. She may have 'just been a journo' for the Pragopress. I guess even she may be no longer with us.

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Looks almost perfect.  I am surprised that any of the sheet metal survived the years in storage.  It looks new.  Great job.  Any other surviving pieces of the body that you can use or use for patterns?  Still enjoy following along and look forward to your posts with my morning coffee.

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