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preservation - Buffing Patina


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Looking for advice on preserving existing paint patina on 1940 LaSalle . Do not want to clear coat as do not like the "fake" look of clear. I have Dewalt with polishing bonnet - buff it bare or use (?). Most of paint appears to have a sheen under existing that would buff nicely. I am considering then wiping down with lindseed oil (anyone use this and what were results. 

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Others have had success removing rust with CLR then carefully hand polishing and waxing. I wouldn't use a power buffer unless you are very experienced and even then it will remove more paint than you want it to. By hand will take longer but no danger of damaging what is left of the paint.

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Thanks 

!The patina will go with the surfboard on top.......it is a surf mobile and am putting something out there to stimulate sports people to consider taking old cars, making them mechanically sound and looks secondary.....where the patina contains character for the surfer look.  Save An Old Vehicle/Save an Old Board!

 

There are several youtube videos about linseed oil for this type of finish......but, wax is also under consideration.

 

Thanks again!

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About once a month,I wipe down my original paint 57 Bel Air with WD-40.A little shiny to start.but dulls down nicely after a couple of days.Try it on an inconspicous  spot and see how you like.At any rate it does wear off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I've used Mother's mag and aluminum polish by hand with much success but the surface has to be pretty smooth. To smooth the surface,  I wet Sanded with 1500 grit,  using wd40 as the lubricant with no water.  You can step up to 1000 if necessary but do it in bright light to make sure you are only cutting mostly the rough rust coming through the paint and not much of the paint.  You will feel when it gets smooth enough.  You will be surprised how good you can make it look if you are careful,  but I do agree,  there is a lot of missing paint on your car so you are only going to be able to get it so far.  You can use wd40 and 0000 steel wool on the chrome then follow it up with Mother's as well.   It seems to be one of the best ways I have found to clean the chrome without scratching it.  Be sure to clean all loose dirt off wit ha soft brush first if it's a barn fresh type car with any sand on it. 

Have fun and good luck.  You aren]t really going to hurt it,  so experiment a little and post back which way you thought worked best. 

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I am afraid at least the front end of your LaSalle has long since passed the "patina" stage. I would worry more about repairing the missing paint than polishing the remaining paint. Just my opinion of course. Anyone who looks at your car will immediately notice the missing paint regardless of the condition of the remaining paint.

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11 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

 Anyone who looks at your car will immediately notice the missing paint regardless of the condition of the remaining paint.

 

 Does it really matter if the paint is missing.

 

 There are a lot of bald headed men on this site!
 

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Yes there are alot of bald headed men, like myself and I'm only 43,  but I wear a hat to hide it. 

 

I also want to see a picture of that Buick Coupe after you finished.  I have done a few cars this way,  but none with really any heavy surface rust like that.  Most still had atleast a few mills of paint left.

 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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1939-40 Cads and LaSalles have grilles that were plated in their entirety and then paint was applied over the plain/flat sections, as in this case.  It's always a problem getting paint to properly adhere, or to remain adhered, so loss of paint on those areas is a common problem.  Others have finished removing that paint, then repainted those sections only after slightly roughing up the underlying plating.

 

Bald?  I was losing hair at 18, and I'm long past that.  Hats are ESSENTIAL for us!

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I THINK I WOULD START WITH A GOOD CLAY BAR AND SOAP,ID CLAY IT TWICE THEN GET SOME NUMBER 7 AUTO POLISH AT O REILLYS AND POLISH IT REAL GOOD.AS FAR AS THE RUST GOES USE SOME METAL PREO AND A FINE SCOTCH BRITE PAD ON THE RUST ONLY AND POLISH RIGHT OVER IT, THATS ME, YOU MAY CHOOSE TO DO IT DIFFERENTLY,    DAVE

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I have formulated my own line of products for saving old finishes. I have not brought it to market yet(stalled in the patent process) It is a one step system, that is applied in direct sun light. It uses a secret photosynthesis process. Kind of like a chia pet, but better. It works on all paints and chrome, chrome takes two coats. Here is a before and after shot. I think it will change the way we see and approach restoration/builds. I am hoping to sell it for three payment of $39.99 dollars. And will most likely do a"if you act now" type of thing and offer two bottles.  

wood grain 015.JPG

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2 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

I have formulated my own line of products for saving old finishes. I have not brought it to market yet(stalled in the patent process) It is a one step system, that is applied in direct sun light. It uses a secret photosynthesis process. Kind of like a chia pet, but better. It works on all paints and chrome, chrome takes two coats. Here is a before and after shot. I think it will change the way we see and approach restoration/builds. I am hoping to sell it for three payment of $39.99 dollars. And will most likely do a"if you act now" type of thing and offer two bottles.  

wood grain 015.JPG

buick 025.JPG

Where do I send my money. ;)

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I know demand will be high, that is why I have not talked about this. It will shut down the paint industry. Right now people are after this secret sauce for paint. I am asking all of you to please keep it on the down low, until it hits the market.

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Getting back to the original question about using linseed oil: Cli55er over on the PackardInfo site had a series of posts on his 55 Packard Clipper project blog about using linseed oil to preserve the original and worn finish. It was a multi-step process and turned out quite nicely. Suggest you take a look at it. JWL

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I have a 41 Ford Truck that was clear-coated by the previous owner to preserve the patina.  Anyway, that is my guess.  The clear coat did not give it that deep shiny look that it appears you want to avoid.  He may have only applied one coat.  It darkened the surface rust, but looks age appropriate.  Here's a few shots for your interest.5a4bbd6de927c_Beforepic.jpg.05d37cdd046739923aee0a8e5d0d98c7.jpgIMG_2539.thumb.JPG.dbe6fe122760b285a6fbef742113e9dd.JPGIMG_2543.thumb.JPG.baeca6bd293892898f075032e480a1bd.JPG

 

I removed old repairs and made patch panels.  The shiny color you see in the next photo is for contrast against the clear-coated paint.  It is a spray can paint application applied only to protect the bare metal from rust in the repair area.

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In short, I'd encourage you to consider a clear coat.

Edited by kgreen
spelling, I am a rotten speller! (see edit history)
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I have real problems with the concept of "preserving the patina". Patina is a process. The patina on a car today will be different from the patina on a car tomorrow or a week from today or a year from today. "preserving the patina" produces a surface that is in every way as fake and historically inaccurate as any repaint. "Preserving the patina" freezes the natural decay process of the finish at a specific point in time. You may be doing your best to prevent further deterioration of the finish and that is great but you certainly are not preserving the original finish.

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I can't speak from experience on the rusted areas other than to suggest the possible use of a rust converter product that stops it and turns it to a black oxide finish, I'm sure others will know more.

 

I successfully brought back the oem lacquer finish on a 34 Packard. Like you I was unsure what to do but in the end I used a foam pad on a slow speed buffer with Auto Magic RFS-3 liquid wax only. Due to the amount of finish removed even by the wax I resolved to do this one time only, since the car was garaged and not driven in wet weather. I was very happy with the results and it greatly improved the look of the finish.

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After I have cut and buffed anything,  I usually just glaze it with something after that for maintenance of the finish.  Meguiar's used to have a show car glaze.  I think it was like #34 or something that worked really well.  It didn't last long if the car was left in the sun for more than a day or so,  but it went back on easy and left no paint residue on the rag so I know it wasn't working the finish any further.  Most of the cars I have done,  had bad paint in one way or another so anything was an improvement. 

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18 hours ago, leosdad said:

About once a month,I wipe down my original paint 57 Bel Air with WD-40.A little shiny to start.but dulls down nicely after a couple of days.Try it on an inconspicuous  spot and see how you like.At any rate it does wear off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I used to use WD-40 on a dull oxidized camper shell that was black. It came out great but would also need reapplication. The only problem was it attracted dust like a super magnet.

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20 hours ago, Harold said:

Someone on another forum used Penetrol on his paint and it brought up a nice shine.  Seems to hold up pretty well.

NEVER under any circumstances use penetrol for this! I tried it on my original paint 1936 Ford fire truck and it removed the paint! 

I have an original paint 1913 Harley that has remained stable over 35 years ownership with the occasional spraying of WD40.

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I am  Mixing salt, vinegar and hydrogen peroxide and putting it on the bare metal on my courtesy car to cause rust. Strange world we live in. It is working pretty good, just waiting on plate stickers from the DMV. And take it out to see how it drives.

phone pic 012.jpg

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11 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

I am  Mixing salt, vinegar and hydrogen peroxide and putting it on the bare metal on my courtesy car to cause rust. Strange world we live in. It is working pretty good, just waiting on plate stickers from the DMV. And take it out to see how it drives.

phone pic 012.jpg

 

 

 I achieved the rust on my new body panels on my 38 Buick by spraying stright bleach on them.

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On 1/2/2018 at 6:23 PM, Xander Wildeisen said:

I am  Mixing salt, vinegar and hydrogen peroxide and putting it on the bare metal on my courtesy car to cause rust. Strange world we live in. It is working pretty good, just waiting on plate stickers from the DMV. And take it out to see how it drives.

 

 

My F-150 rusts just at the sight of salt and the paint peels every time the wind blows.

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On 1/3/2018 at 4:18 PM, GARY F said:

Why does it have 2 wiper towers on the cowl and 1 on the roof?

 

The 39 Buick uses a chain drive in the wiper towers and they broke after I spent too much time trying to get them to work, so I installed 2 elect wipers on the roof.

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Be careful of the rust converters recommended in some of the responses(Ospho). I love the stuff, been using it for over forty years, but when the rusty areas butt up against painted surfaces, that you want to save, there's a problem. I will guarantee that any paint touched with this stuff, will lift. Another caution, panel will no longer look like red rust, it will be black. 

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On ‎1‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 2:20 PM, Roger Walling said:

 

 Yes it is towing a Fierro.

 The finished product below.

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That looks fun.

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