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He is storing a Cord outside under a tarp?  Looks like the bumpers were rechromed at some point, now going to crap from tarp storage.  Wrong coast or the sedan would have potential for me for parts.   But I spent my money ,  On the Garage First. 

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Don't jump to conclusions re' the west coast climate---while I've only been thru Walla Walla once (that was enough) I do believe it's generally in the dry part of the state...(I'm in Portland, OR)...

The eastern 2/3 of both OR and WA are generally dry; get out an atlas and you'll see lots of miles and miles of nothing but miles and miles...hard to develop without water

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Walla Walla? Dry and dusty hot summers, snowy cold winters. Thats pretty much the story for anything east of the cascades in WA. Look for Stevens pass, Snoqualmie pass, or White pass on a map. Anything east is dry.

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)

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The western half of washington state is dry.  I think they call it "high desert".

 

The phaeton is worth around 25k  depending on how complete it is.    The westchester is a 10k car.    Easy entry to a couple of GREAT cars but a long long road ahead.

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14 minutes ago, alsancle said:

The western half of washington state is dry.  I think they call it "high desert".

 

The phaeton is worth around 25k  depending on how complete it is.    The westchester is a 10k car.    Easy entry to a couple of GREAT cars but a long long road ahead.

 

My mistake.  If the Phaeton is in fact a Cabriolet then it is worth 30-35k or maybe a bit more.   You probably see 3 or 4 Phaetons for every Cabriolet.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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The problem with the sedan is you can buy a nice older restoration 85 point Cord sedan that runs & drives good for around 50-60K, making restoration of this one an uphill battle economically.   But then again, a lot more people have $13000 in disposable income than $50000.  

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You are correct Jason.  It is an entry point in to a great car.   On the plus side:

 

1.  ACD club is very active and supportive.

2.  Parts are available

3.  Complexity of the car is way overated.

4.  One of the best looking prewar designs of all cars.

5.  Very drivable car when well sorted.

 

On the negative side:

 

1.  15-20 years worth of restoration!

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19 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

My mistake.  If the Phaeton is in fact a Cabriolet then it is worth 30-35k or maybe a bit more.   You probably see 3 or 4 Phaetons for every Cabriolet.

 

I think it's a phaeton from what I'm seeing in the picture, a cabriolet would have a much smaller opening in the tub.  The area behind the front windows looks plenty big for both the rear window and the top cover.

 

Alsancle hits on a very good point.  The transmission electro-pneumatic controls scare some people off, but if you study and work on it, it's not that complicated.  I was having some trouble with my Cord shifting, talked to a guru in the ACD club.  His first question, are you planning to drive the car?  Yes.  He added that, if so, then I needed to personally work on the transmission, so that if I was stuck somewhere I'd know what to do.  He said that, unless you're on an ACD tour, you're pretty much guaranteed that NO ONE else is going to know how to work on it.

 

Turned out my problem was half mechanical (loose shift arm, sloppy shifting), half electrical (needed some wiring replaced and column switch rebuilt), and half pneumatic (rebuild valves).  Yes, I know that's more than 100%, but work on one and you'll understand.  Again, not complex if you break it down into components, but everything must work together.

 

Personally, I think 10 would be a good buy on the sedan, 25 sounds a little high to me on the open car considering what picture shows.  Auburnseeker, you should be buying the sedan, yes, $2K to move it to you, but then you'd have a "complete" phaeton, and the sedan partnered with it would add probably 20K to the value of your wrong-engine phaeton.  Just my opinion.

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3 minutes ago, trimacar said:

 

I think it's a phaeton from what I'm seeing in the picture, a cabriolet would have a much smaller opening in the tub.  The area behind the front windows looks plenty big for both the rear window and the top cover.

 

 

Pictures made me think Phaeton, but description says Cabriolet which is why I was not sure.   In either case,  if the seats and top mechanism are missing you are looking at 10k right there.  That doesn't include the new leather or new top.

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28 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

Pictures made me think Phaeton, but description says Cabriolet which is why I was not sure.   In either case,  if the seats and top mechanism are missing you are looking at 10k right there.  That doesn't include the new leather or new top.

 

That's true, but let's say it's $25 K, and you spend another $150K on restoration (and yes, I know that a high end, full professional restoration would probably be more, but most people with any restoration experience could do it for that or less).  10K for your top and seats, $15K to upholster, 20K body work and paint, 20K chrome (actually, very little chrome on a Cord compared to most Full Classics), 25K mechanical restoration, 12K Richardson front end, 25K tires, small parts, instrument repair....that's $137K...

 

You'd still be more or less in the ballpark of value, so it's one of the few cars you could restore and sort of come out on, with good examples hovering around $150K and superb examples bringing $200K.

 

I know some people don't like talking money, but with the cost of restoration these days, it's an unfortunate consideration for those who don't have a lot of zeros in their bank accounts.  Very few project Full Classics you can restore these days and your money is more or less covered by value of car.

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6 hours ago, Bloo said:

I remember that cartoon, that was all about getting that mouse. 300 miles from Idaho in any direction is a good spot for cars, unless they are parked under pine trees. Walla Walla is not far from me. A person would be wise to buy both cars, if they wanted to restore the convertible. I like Auburnseekers Cord just the way it is, but I understand the  logic of the sedan to put it back to original.

 

 

 

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It would be a big gamble.  That engine looks a bit scary to me.  Is it seized?  Cracked? I know it would need rebuild either way but there is a lot of corrosion on that engine and the way the dash is rusty,  that tarp has probably held in more moisture than it kept out. 

The right car will come along some day,  Or I'll trade it for an Auburn as is.   Of course I keep buying stuff for it,  so the deal gets sweeter or I have a much easier restoration as time goes by.  It's in my 50 degree dry shop under a clear cover right now that doesn't go to the floor.  That's with the outside Temperature at -10, so it should look the same or the next several years, unlike either of these cars. 

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I'm pretty sure it's a phaeton as well.  That's alot of room between the the top of the rear tub and the door line.  I can't imagine a sportsman would be more than 2 feet for the folding tonneau.  I wonder if that car is rusty in the lowers.  There is alot of surface rust on the cowl and door and those are the places that rust last.  That floor pan just loves to collect water.  Nothing to say that it was always a western car either.  I see alot of missing parts,  they hopefully have,  in relation to the interior. 

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I wouldn't jump to many conclusions about the condition of these Cords.  It's almost always worse than what pictures would suggest, and particularly when the vehicles are "barn finds" without the benefit of a barn.   Any one seriously interested should carefully inspect the cars on site to best determine their apparent condition, and figure the mechanicals, especially the transmission, will need major tlc and $$$$.
Restored closed Cords are considerably under-priced, and in my opinion are a real bargain.  On the other hand, for those contemplating restoration, the price of parts, supplies, and labor isn't cheap and won't likely go south.  These cars would possibly yield the most if parted out.  Cord parts are rarer and expensive when compared to those of various other marques, and put a big dent in wallets. 
Not to discourage those who consider the fun and challenge of restoring to be what is most important to them, go for it!  I'd hate to see these cars not be restored.

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Looking close at the other picture of that phaeton,  it looks like it might be a rear wheel conversion,  but the tires and wheels on it as well as the stance.  It sits High in the rear. 

Probably the reason he has the sedan was to do a conversion. 

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I remember from other posts that some people will not call on a listing with out a stated price, I guess we will never know what the asking price is on the open car.:P

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Here are the pictures so 5  years from now we know what we were talking about.  I agree with the rear drive conversion theory.

 

 

 

00n0n_6YIhO20Rmsd_1200x900.jpg

00s0s_5JoyDCHq8pO_1200x900.jpg

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"25K tires, small parts, instrument repair.."

 

I think he meant all the small stuff including tires,  that will add up to the 25K.  Wire harness, new battery, new glass, rubber bits, I'm guessing nothing is really nice and will just need a little cleaning to look new.  This car looks like every piece needs heavy rehab. That front fender needs alot of help and that's from what I can see in the photo. I see day light through the firewall.  I'll bet there is alot missing from this car.  

You would be better to buy mine than try to restore this one and restore it instead.  I'll take the money and start looking for an Auburn.  

Besides it's guaranteed that as soon as I sell mine,  the value on these will sky rocket. ;)

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If you just went out there and bought it now bad could you get hurt. You wouldn't lose the whole $13,500. And if you ended up working on the car for the next 30 years the entry fee wouldn't matter.

 

Years of good mental health and a fraction of professional fees.

 

Too small a car for my taste, I'd prefer a project Roadmaster.

 

Bernie

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Thanks for tuning in, when we come back from commercial we will put the finishing touches on our project Cord, with just a little buffing to do we will wrap up this 30 minute episode of what you can do with 200K. Please tune in next week when we show you how to chop tops with just simple tools laying around the garage.

Forest Grove 126.JPG

Forest Grove 127.JPG

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4 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Looking close at the other picture of that phaeton,  it looks like it might be a rear wheel conversion,  but the tires and wheels on it as well as the stance.  It sits High in the rear. 

Probably the reason he has the sedan was to do a conversion. 

I second (or 3rd?) the motion/notion that it's a rwd conversion.  The elimination of the removable transmission cover (between the front fenders) and installation of something that doesn't appear to come off confirms it.  No "real" Cord can exist without access there. 

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It actually looks like some sort of frame horn sticking out under the passenger side front fender that's definitely not Cord.

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