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Any experience with Plain Ol' Trailers?


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Looking at getting quotes and had a look at this company. They seem to be making fairly good trailers. Mostly positive reviews. I did have a tour of their plant in Pearson GA and seemed to be good work. Had anyone any experience about getting one of their trailers?

 

I am looking at a 24' "Rolling Vault"; 7 k axles; It does have 6" I Beams and can be upgraded to 8" I beams for another $1,000. But the seller it should be ok with my possible weight could be as much as a 7,000-pound car (I am at overkill, but planning for the future).

 

http://plainoltrailers.com/

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You get what you pay for.  Notice their trailer the same size as mine is rated 8000 pounds less. Thin side walls...... .024 any decent trailer is .040 and the good ones are .060 the welding is poor on them, and the trailr weighs less because they use thin wall tubing. Wells Cargo Auto Wagons are very, very good......and my frame broke hauling a V-12 Packard. Cheap trailers are fine for small modern cars from the 60’s and 70’s. If you don’t spend 18 to 30grand, your buying ..............junk. 

 

You get get what you pay for...........where did I hear that!

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Having travelled a 50 mile radius around Douglas Ga. to tour the 5 different trailer manufacturers, we settled on a 24' round nose car hauler from Arising Ind. in Fitzgerald, Ga. because it has a 2"x4"  box steel full perimeter frame and treated 5/8" plywood floor.

I got the .024" side sheets to save on weight, knowing that they "oilcan" like crazy. To do over, I would have chosen the .040 side sheets.

I made my own escape door. with only a 4" grinder and a torch, that is 75" square. Got the hinges and latch from "Etrailer" at a very reasonable cost.

I also installed new spring shackles with bolts you can grease,  and 2" taller equalizers. Realigned the trailer suspension with a 6 foot steel bar so that the wheels track straight. Boy did it need that !

Ten K miles so far and no noticeable tire wear. Had the wheels balanced too.

Put in a Harbor Freight 4K ATV winch and a battery charger from an outfit in Salt Lake city.

I painted the inside with white walls and grey floor (with a bit of sand in the floor paint).

Installed 2x2 guide rails for the baby, so loading is a "hands free" operation either driving in or winching in, as there is only 3" on each side between the running boards and the wheel wells.

I have towed this unit with a '40 Buick LTD in it all over Colorado for a couple of years now and am very happy with what is really a rolling garage.

 

Mike in Colorado

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Edited by FLYER15015 (see edit history)
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14 minutes ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Mike, could you please explain the red strips on the floor and ramp door.  I think I know what you are doing, but, I would think that you would lose sight of them coming up the ramp.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

Figuring they are 2x2(?) wood guides for the tires. Aides the steering to keep the car centered like you said. Smart! :)

Edited by dei (see edit history)
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Terry,

See the red tabs on the door flap ?

Line the car up straight on the trailer with the center of the tire centered on these tabs.

Take your hands off the wheel and drive right in. Or winch her in if you prefer.

The rails are a 2x4 ripped in half with the rounded edges up.

The trailer is "vehicle specific".

 

Mike in Colorado

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Anyone else here bumper pull an enclosed car hauler trailer just about every day ?

 

Year round in every state ?

 

I do - here is what I have learned thru experience:

 

Money is not necessarily a reflection of quality - actual construction features are ....

 

Most low quality enclosed car hauler trailers DO NOT have a full perimeter steel frame - they have (2) frame rails set in from the edge

and use " outriggers " to connect to the outside wall - these trailers break apart causing the roof to tear from twisting - I bought one

of these trailers  from " Freedom Trailers " as my first trailer & it lasted less than a year ....

 

A full perimeter steel tube frame is a mandatory starting point with solid welds - it makes for a heavier frame less likely to flex & break.

 

8 inch steel tubing that is 3/16" nominal thick is the best perimeter frame design provided it has solid welds.

 

Trailers are built on an assembly line utilizing production methods adopted to save the manufacturer time & money.

 

Specifying construction features will increase production time & result in more expense - be prepared to pay more for a better built trailer.

 

A unitized frame where the floor - sidewalls - roof bows are in alignment is the strongest design if full welds are used,

if this is not possible have at least (2) structural supports that " wrap " the components together installed at the front & rear.

 

Run a third  center steel tube frame member from the tongue to the first axle.

 

Make sure you have a " one piece roof " with no screws installed thru the top frame under it down into the trailer.

 

Most low quality trailers have .024 inch thick exterior aluminum walls - these ripple & flex - .030 thick walls are the minimum you should spec.

 

Most low quality trailers use screws drilled into the top roof bows from above to hold the roof trim panels inside the trailers in place,

these back out & tear the roof material over time.

 

If you have a strong frame - the other details are personal choices that vary from user to user.

 

 

Jim

 

 

 

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)
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Going back to WC and Pace as Edinmass and others have suggested. I now have bottom line specs (?) I got frustrated by lack of response from Pace and WC, but they were celebrating Christmas <grin> POT were ready to go! Build me one in 3-4 weeks. They are a few miles south of me in Georgia seems to be the capital of the world in trailer mfg. Glad you are all slowing me down and getting focused on better trailer ideas. POT told me the had the same materials and construction as Pace, Haulmark, etc.

 

So here is my list, so far.


1. 8k Axles - Tandem - though triple axles suggested.  Still may go for triple axles, but I have 24foot Hydraulic tilt open with triple 7k torsion axles and it is very hard to back up and the tires scrub in turns. I am not good at backing up. Mostly life experience <grin>

 

2. LED  Exterior and interior lighting   

 

3. Recessed passenger doorstep

 

4. Extra height 24" (eight-foot clearance)

5. ATP Transition flap (between ramp and body)

6. Bogey Wheels

 

7. Bulldog Hitch

 

8. Extra heavy duty ramp

9. Recessed compartment for spare tire

 

10. Vee nose. bumper pull 26 or 28-foot trailer.

11. Maybe a  5 foot ramp in the Vee nose where I can squeeze in a golf cart or at least a motorcycle.

 

12. Minimum .030 walls

 

13. Not a perimeter frame, but do use 8" I Beams

 

Sounds like many of the suggestions, in getting a Pace American, maybe a Shadow or WC

 

I use a 2016 GMC Denali Duramax 400hp diesel with trailer package. Do I also need a weight distribution hitch?

My current trailers are a 1997 Featherlite Gooseneck trailer and for stock car racer, Ricky Rudd. It was his display and personal car hauler. Was about $85,000 when new. Featherlite is probably the best, but too pricey. I like a camper shell and I have to remove it to use the gooseneck. 36 foot is a bit long and height is too low about six foot. Since most of my cars are open, they will all fit. But the wheel wells are about 79" and gets too tight with a low, wide car, like our 1947 Lincoln Continental -- less than one-half inch clearing the body.

Also a 2016 Hawke Hydraulic Tilt. Very well for open carry, but I want to keep our cars enclosed. It is also cumbersome backing up. Much different than a tandem trailer. GVRW at 21,000 pounds.

 

I want an all around enclosed trailer! Good, don't seem to spring for a Featherlite.

Anything else? 

Got some great advice from Ed, but I have a hearing loss and may have missed some things. If any can add to my list, greatly appreciated!!

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Bill,  my only piece of advice is to not get it too big if you can help yourself.  Ed will talk you into a 40 foot trailer.   The more trailer, the more weight, the more strain on the tow unit.  I have two friends who blew up their 3500 tow rated rigs just putting down the highway, but pulling really big ass trailers.

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22 hours ago, FLYER15015 said:

Terry,

See the red tabs on the door flap ?

Line the car up straight on the trailer with the center of the tire centered on these tabs.

Take your hands off the wheel and drive right in. Or winch her in if you prefer.

The rails are a 2x4 ripped in half with the rounded edges up.

The trailer is "vehicle specific".

 

Mike in Colorado

 

I use a similar idea for my enclosed trailer. I use a 40" wide (haven't measured recently) warehouse 20-foot rack standard. I add 2x4s or 1x4s (rounded) to adjust for vehicle tracks. Once a vehicle is "on track" just winch it in. no driver needed. I also have the rack positioned with long bolts that are fixed to the track and go through holes in the trailer about 2 inches. Stays in place. But can easily be picked up and moved out of the trailer if needed for trailer's original use. I can haul a 1/2" clearance if wanted an Indy Car. Well, if I got one, might hang it on the wall. Don't see one to drive, but keeping my options open.

Another winching the car into the trailer is that some of my cars are not only widebody but thick doors! You can't get out of the car unless through a car window. Try THAT in an enclosed trailer!!! I also don't need an escape door. This really helps. The Featherlite has double extension ramps. It is a sweet rig! BUT with only has 6'3" clearance and this is not enough for tall cars.

My wife can load and unload the cars. It is that easy.

 

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Edited by CatBird (see edit history)
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9 minutes ago, alsancle said:

Bill,  my only piece of advice is to not get it too big if you can help yourself.  Ed will talk you into a 40 foot trailer.   The more trailer, the more weight, the more strain on the tow unit.  I have two friends who blew up their 3500 tow rated rigs just putting down the highway, but pulling really big ass trailers.

 

Al, I agree, I want to keep it to 24 or 26' length. Easier to maneuver and I am nervous the bigger the "sail factor" pulling an eight-foot box above a 2 foot more undercarriage. What is that when a strong wind blows or a semi blows past?

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I've towed some over the years. Here are some of the things I've learned.

 

You asked about a weight-distributing hitch. That is a good thing. I assume you'll have a 2 5/16 ball, that also is good.  I eventually converted all my trailers and prime movers to the larger size for ease of hooking up. Speaking of hitching up and before backup cameras, I would prop a broom vertically on the trailer hitch so I had something to aim for. Doing that eliminated the sideways misalignment and I only had to go back and look a half dozen times compared to a dozen.

 

You might also drill another hole through the receiver and ball mount, parallel to and ahead of the pin. and put in a 1/2 or 5/8 hard bolt with a nylok nut. That puts the assembly in double shear, belt and suspenders. That little pin, all by itself is asked to do much.

 

Backing a trailer is something I eventually found to be almost easy. You could get a detachable backup camera, I guess they are pretty cheap. One trick is to move the bottom of the steering wheel in the direction you want the trailer to go.

 

Put in either multiple tie-down points for and aft or have them install racks in the floor that allow you to move tie-downs to the optimum location.

 

When you buy new tires, don't forget the spare. In your tool box, a small generator and electric impact wrench would make tire changing out on the highway less onerous. Practice changing a wheel in the driveway.

 

Get  the proper ball mount that provides for the loaded trailer to ride absolutely parallel to the road. Otherwise, the loaded axle, springs, bearings, tires, etc., carry most of the weight while the other stuff takes a vacation. Stopping is also compromised.

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I've been towing large trailers for decades. I too have some opinions of good ideas. One is to consider a truck with the backup camera. I LOVE this feature on my Silverado. I can easily place the ball directly under the trailer hitch every time, within a half inch, on my first attempt. Saves countless minutes each hookup. 

 

I prefer to replace my tires every few years. I used to work at a tire store, and was surprised at the high percentage of "blown out" tires which came in to our shop which were trailer tires, even though these were just a fraction of the tires on the road. Later in life, I experience tire failures much too often myself. So now I replace tires every 4 years or so, regardless of mileage or appearance. 

 

Go for the weight-distributing hitch. WELL worth it, along with the friction bar which prevents pulsations as you tow. 

 

Carry several reflectors and/or brightly-colored brand new traffic cones, for inevitable road-side stops. Far too many drivers will not get over for you as you try to change a tire or such, even when the left lanes are wide open. And too many of them don't even see you until they are right on top of you. 

 

Buy a cheap cordless electric impact wrench from horrible freight or similar. Keep in charged and in its case in your trailer or tow vehicle, along with an assortment of sockets. One or two strong flashlights are indispensible, and a magnetic work light is a good idea also. 

 

Take along an electrical tester, spare bulbs, some spare wiring, connectors, etc. I like to bring a very long electrical wire with alligator clips at both ends. When trying to trace down a pesky short or non-working light, I will sometimes stretch that wire all the way from the ground post of the battery in my tow vehicle back to the light I am trying to fix. You would be surprised how often you'll find that a bad ground somewhere is the problem. 

 

Finally, keep a reflective vest in your trailer, so you will show up in headlights if you are broken down on the side of the road. 

 

Most of my above tips are WAY overkill, especially if you have a brand new trailer. But in my experience, stuff happens, especially with trailers. And usually at the worst possible moment. The life you save might be your own...

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CatBird,

Take a day and drive over to Fitzgerald Ga. and talk to the guys @ Arizing ind.

They will build you a tall trailer with straight axles, so the interior wheel wells are only 6-8" tall.

Full perimeter boxed steel frame and a rounded front end is their specialty.

 

Mike in Colorado

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I would also like to make a suggestion or two,

 

I found out the hard way that if I placed some foam pipe insulation over my door cables I could have saved a lot of money and grief! I have a 60 Impala and just like Catbird's Caddy it JUST fits in the trailer very little margin for error, a true game of inches. I had the rails inside the trailer but not on the ramp (at that time). The problem was my own fault, sad part is I did have a winch, but it was late and I was tired and figured why not drive it in. It was about 11 PM and I was going to the meet in Melbourne a few years ago from my home in Ocala. I was over too far to the right and hooked the cable, I tried to correct it but no luck, I go to get out of the car and the cable on the driver side was blocking the door, I then reached for my cell phone which was sitting on the bench in the garage. My only option was to go back it out. I caused about $5,000 in damage on an original lacquer paint car. I don't know if the cables would have prevented any damage, but it would have been much less. It was an expensive lesson. I also heard of a story of a young boy running and ran into a cable and left a pretty nasty scar on his face.

 

In the end I ended up having to repaint/restore the entire car which I ended getting an AACA  National Award with this year and it came out very nice, but..... 

 

 While at the Grand National at Shelbyville a few years ago I noticed a gentleman with a late 40's earl 50 Chrysler product that mounted a laser level on his hood and lined the level up with a mark he had on the front of the trailer, which I thought was a great idea. You need a car that has a fixed square point to key the laser and pretty strong laser that will work in daylight. It made his life real easy loading the car in

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Our all-aluminum (including chassis and floor) trailer is a 24 ft with a tapered and wedged nose adding 4-1/2 ft of additional storage, less wind resistance, and mounting surface for BOTH spare tires. The additional foot of height allows brass-era cars to load in without having to lower the top. The raised floor above the pair of 6,000 lb axles results in a 4-1/2 inch wheelbox so 1950s era cars can still open the door over the awning-style driver-side escape door, and we have ten pairs of tie-down locations, well-braced so almost any car can be set to properly balance the trailer with 60% of the weight forward of the axle centers. I always use an equalizer hitch. I also specified multiple roof and side-wall vents, as well as multiple roof, floor, and sidewall lighting for ease of tie-down in the dark without holding a flashlight with my teeth. The electric winch and electric tongue jack set far enough back to allow  a tailgate or hatch to open are also a significant benefit.

 

Go with the best you can afford - you wont be sorry.

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On 12/28/2017 at 7:18 PM, edinmass said:

You get what you pay for.  Notice their trailer the same size as mine is rated 8000 pounds less. Thin side walls...... .024 any decent trailer is .040 and the good ones are .060 the welding is poor on them, and the trailr weighs less because they use thin wall tubing. Wells Cargo Auto Wagons are very, very good......and my frame broke hauling a V-12 Packard. Cheap trailers are fine for small modern cars from the 60’s and 70’s. If you don’t spend 18 to 30grand, your buying ..............junk. 

 

You get get what you pay for...........where did I hear that!

 

Ed, I can pay this, trying to get through to Pace and Wells Cargo. Perhaps they are out for the holidays. Will try them next week.

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5 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

Our all-aluminum (including chassis and floor) trailer is a 24 ft with a tapered and wedged nose adding 4-1/2 ft of additional storage, less wind resistance, and mounting surface for BOTH spare tires. The additional foot of height allows brass-era cars to load in without having to lower the top. The raised floor above the pair of 6,000 lb axles results in a 4-1/2 inch wheelbox so 1950s era cars can still open the door over the awning-style driver-side escape door, and we have ten pairs of tie-down locations, well-braced so almost any car can be set to properly balance the trailer with 60% of the weight forward of the axle centers. I always use an equalizer hitch. I also specified multiple roof and side-wall vents, as well as multiple roof, floor, and sidewall lighting for ease of tie-down in the dark without holding a flashlight with my teeth. The electric winch and electric tongue jack set far enough back to allow  a tailgate or hatch to open are also a significant benefit.

 

Go with the best you can afford - you wont be sorry.

 

Marty, sounds perfect! Where can I get one like this? The money is not the problem.

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A lot of good advice here.  Specify tire pressure monitors on your trailer. This allows you to spot a problem before the BLOWOUT.  It is nice to have options on where to change a tire that is losing air pressure.  If I were going to haul heavy classics I would go with the 17.5 tires/rims rather than 16 inch..I have towed over a quarter million miles and if I never have to change a tire along the interstate at night again it will be too soon.  Just my TCW.  Bob Smits

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2 hours ago, CatBird said:

 

Marty, sounds perfect! Where can I get one like this? The money is not the problem.

 

CatBird:

 

Ours was custom-built by Forest River in Elkhart, Indiana. They specialize in RVs and Motorhomes, but have separate division which makes Car Haulers and cargo trailers. I would imagine that any of their dealers could get with them to specify what you want.

By the way, the extra height also yields an extra long ramp-door which eases the approach angle. My driver-side escape door opens upward, and is extra long to accommodate a variety of car sizes and door configurations. I can also control my interior lights from the side access door as well as from the ramp door. Bob is right about the tire pressure monitors - but also carry a light weight plastic ramp, available from most RV dealers for around $50. When (not IF, but WHEN) you have to change a trailer tire, jacking the trailer is a miserable job - especially dangerous on the side of the Interstate. Loosen the lug nuts just enough to allow them to turn without effort, pull the "good" tire onto the ramp, and the flat will be hanging in the air. Reverse the procedure - No Sweat (Literally). 

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17 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

 

CatBird:

 

Ours was custom-built by Forest River in Elkhart, Indiana. They specialize in RVs and Motorhomes, but have separate division which makes Car Haulers and cargo trailers. I would imagine that any of their dealers could get with them to specify what you want.

2

 

Marty, Forest River looks very good. They have nine types of car haulers.
http://www.forestriverinc.com/cargo-trailers.aspx

 

Could you give me the model name for yours? Would be very helpful.

 

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Marty........and Bill, never get a flat tire again on your trailer. Run this Sailun tire, it weighs 62 pounds.......twice what the Goodyear tires do, it is a load range “G” and runs 110 lbs pressure. They last about 80,000 miles hauling heavy cars. And they cost much less than the Goodyear’s. I’m not normally a fan of Chinese tires, but these are an exception. I have 40k on my current set and they are still better than 60 percent tread left. They are speed rated unlike almost all other trailer tires. I was having a flats Very often and now don’t even think about tires anymore. I run Michelin’s on the truck. I can’t say enough good about the Sailuns..........I won’t consider any other tire on the trailer. Look at the load rating almost 1000 pounds more than any other tire. 14 Ply and the run COOL all day long at 75mph in the summer heat. All steel sidewall and carcass, be sure to get the 235/85 as they have a larger rolling diameter. They fit all my trailers fine, no clearance issues. I was going to go to a 17.5 inch rim.....but the wheels and tires would cost a fortune. With these you just run your factory wheels with a high pressure air stem.

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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On 12/30/2017 at 12:11 AM, Marty Roth said:

 

but also carry a light weight plastic ramp, available from most RV dealers for around $50. When (not IF, but WHEN) you have to change a trailer tire, jacking the trailer is a miserable job - especially dangerous on the side of the Interstate. Loosen the lug nuts just enough to allow them to turn without effort, pull the "good" tire onto the ramp, and the flat will be hanging in the air. Reverse the procedure - No Sweat (Literally). 

 

I have one of these ramps for my trailer from Trailer-Aid. You can buy these on-line or at RV/Trailer dealers for under $50. A few years ago I had a flat on my trailer on the way to Fall Hershey in the rain. I did what Marty mentions above and had the tire changed on my FULLY LOADED trailer in just a few minutes. 

 

I agree with others here that good quality trailer tires are important. Even more important is keeping them PROPERLY INFLATED and covered with tire covers when not in use.

 

I too use a weight distributing hitch with dual cam sway control. Many vehicle manufacturers "recommend" the use of a weight distributing hitch when the towed trailer exceeds a certain tongue weight. Check your tow vehicle owner's guide and chances are it's in there. BTW, just because your tow vehicle is a dually, heavy duty truck that does not mean you do not need sway control when towing a bumper pull trailer. If I had a $1 for every dually, HD truck without sway control I have seen towing a swaying trailer I could buy a lot of forum members a nice dinner. 

 

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Trailering is inherently dangerous, and people who own the heavier cars are at much more risk for problems and accidents. In my humble opinion all car trailers should have 16 inch tires even for lighter cars and trailers. I always buy a trailer heavier than I need, just for the safety factor. Recently I went to this triple axle spread unit. It’s fantastic. Stable beyond belief, and the extra axle makes the breaking MUCH improved. I will never own any trailer now that doesn’t have the triple set up. Plugging in the math, the trailer suspension and frame is rated at 24k, the GVW is 21k rated. Add in the car and trailer weight and I have 6k extra loading for tools, parts, engines, etc. My unit is much longer than most people need, but I often haul additional bulky items while on the road. Important thing to think about is any truck with a receiver can move your trailer off the road in the event of a towing truck issue, having s fifth wheel or goose neck makes over the road problems much harder to solve. For big CCCA classics, 24 feet is the minimum length, 26 or 28 is best for some extra luggage room and some small parts. My unit in the photo is a 34 foot box .......it’s a big thing to haul and deal with, and fuel fill Ups can be challenging. After hauling it for 50k I am so use to it I don’t notice the inconvenience of pulling it. In the future, if I ever buy another trailer, I think I would get a 30 footer. 

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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15 hours ago, CatBird said:

 

Marty, Forest River looks very good. They have nine types of car haulers.
http://www.forestriverinc.com/cargo-trailers.aspx

 

Could you give me the model name for yours? Would be very helpful.

 

 

CatBird, I could not find a model name - mine was a custom build with a round top, wedged and tapered nose, aluminum chassis and floor, extra height, raised floor.

Sorry I cannot be more helpful

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39 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Trailering is inherently dangerous, and people who own the heavier cars are at much more risk for problems and accidents. In my humble opinion all car trailers should have 16 inch tires even for lighter cars and trailers. I always buy a trailer heavier than I need, just for the safety factor. Recently I went to this triple axle spread unit. It’s fantastic. Stable beyond belief, and the extra axle makes the breaking MUCH improved. I will never own any trailer now that doesn’t have the triple set up. Plugging in the math, the trailer suspension and frame is rated at 24k, the GVW is 21k rated. Add in the car and trailer weight and I have 6k extra loading for tools, parts, engines, etc. My unit is much longer than most people need, but I often haul additional bulky items while on the road. Important thing to think about is any truck with a receiver can move your trailer off the road in the event of a towing truck issue, having s fifth wheel or goose neck makes over the road problems much harder to solve. For big CCCA classics, war feet is the minimum length, 26 or 28 is best for some extra luggage room and some small parts. My unit in the photo is a 34 foot box .......it’s a big thing to haul and deal with, and fuel fill Ups can be challenging. After hauling it for 50k I am so use to it I don’t notice the inconvenience of pulling it. In the future, if I ever buy another trailer, I think I would get a 30 footer. 

 

 

 

That's a big honkin' rig.  Does pulling a set-up like that require a CDL?

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

 

CatBird, I could not find a model name - mine was a custom build with a round top, wedged and tapered nose, aluminum chassis and floor, extra height, raised floor.

Sorry I cannot be more helpful

 

 

Thanks, Marty, I will send the specs to FR and see what they can do. Your trailer looks perfect for me! Also thanks for the other tips. The TPM sounds like an excellent idea. I had a friend and lost a trailer tire and lost the rig, but his tow vehicle was underpowered as well. Bad combo.

Pace is trying to make me an American. The Shadow GT does not make a v-nose.

 

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56 minutes ago, CatBird said:

 

 

Thanks, Marty, I will send the specs to FR and see what they can do. Your trailer looks perfect for me! Also thanks for the other tips. The TPM sounds like an excellent idea. I had a friend and lost a trailer tire and lost the rig, but his tow vehicle was underpowered as well. Bad combo.

Pace is trying to make me an American. The Shadow GT does not make a v-nose.

 

 

Be sure to consider a one-piece rounded roof with multiple crank open vents, and MAXX-AIR boxes over them so they can stay open during storage without rain coming in, and multiple sidewall vents as well. A transition flap between the floor and the ramp is a plus. Very low wheel boxes over a raised floor make it easy to get the door open farther, and opening over the driver-side escape really helps.

 

By the way, i PULL WITH THREE DIFFERENT TOW VEHICLES:

2002 Suburban 2500 - 8.1Litre

2006 Avalanche 4WD - 8.1 Litre

2000 Excursion 4WD 7.4 Turbo Diesel'

If I needed a new truck, I'd only consider a Crew Cab Long Wheelbase 2500/3500 Series Diesel - with as much Torque as available. Size matters, and length/weight are factors toward safety. (older pics, but am not near the trailer right now).

 

Good luck

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Marty, thanks for the tip several years ago about the tire changing ramp. On a trip from Texas to Florida a few weeks ago my TPM indicated  a drivers side trailer tire losing air.  I was able to pull off the interstate into a gas station instead of changing it on the interstate.  Using the ramp I was back on the road in 14 minutes and it was raining.  The TPM saved me $200 as I wouldn't have known there was a problem until the tire blew.  Ed, thanks for the tire tip.  I am currently using E rated 14 plies but not with the load ratings you show.  You can solve your gas station problems with a auxiliary fuel tank.  With my 90 gal tank I can tow to Florida without stopping for gas which saves me 45-60 minutes on the trip.

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If it hasn't been said, order TWO spare wheels and tires, whether you get a 2- or 3-axle trailer.  I know of two cases (neither of them mine) in which when one tire blew it took out the adjoining tire on the same side.  In the more serious case, the dually prime mover and the tall and expensive aluminum 2-axle trailer wound up on their sides in the median, both totaled, and the $400K car in the trailer was hanging like a bat but with damaged left side fenders.  Remember that aircraft have redundant systems....  TPMS helps but doesn't *prevent* loss of two tires on the same side.  I prefer 3-axle closed trailers for this reason and for stability.

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With the triple, you can use a battery powered impact gun to remove a flat without jacking up the rig, and drive off the highway on two tires safely, then you can change it out when you have a parking lot and plenty of time and space to put on the spare. Of course, with the Sailun tires, you won’t even have a flat. 

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10 minutes ago, edinmass said:

With the triple, you can use a battery powered impact gun to remove a flat without jacking up the rig, and drive off the highway on two tires safely, then you can change it out when you have a parking lot and plenty of time and space to put on the spare. Of course, with the Sailun tires, you won’t even have a flat. 

Been there, done that, Ed.  I also check tire sidewalls, treads, and axle hubs with an infrared thermometer at each pit or fuel stop.  20 degrees higher temp on a tire from previous check of that same tire (assuming others have no or minor change in temp) is grounds for a pre-emptive change.

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15 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

Up north here they always ask for 16" centers rather than 24 " for the roof cross members. With a tube frame have caped ends and check the tongue length as some are shorter.  

 

You bring up a very good point here. Many enclosed trailer manufacturers market lower cost models. In order to hit those lower price points they STRETCH the floor and/or side and/or roof centers from 16" to 24" or use a thinner outer skin, or offer a ramp door that supports less weight or a Leaf Spring suspension instead of a Torsion suspension. These and other features help the manufacturer lower the price of a trailer. One REALLY needs to READ all the DETAILED SPECS for a trailer to make sure one is buying a trailer to fit their needs and understands EXACTLY what they are paying for. Back when I was shopping for a trailer a friend of mine with over 20+ years of trailer owning/towing experience helped me with all my questions including many tips & techniques for towing a trailer. That made my trailer buying experience much more enjoyable.

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Mine is a Cargo-Mate 'Eliminator.

26 ft and has aluminum frame and a floor like Marty shows.

It has AC and heat in the same roof unit. It also has cabinets with a generator and a compressor.

The work bench sports a vice.

inside and outside lights.

It makes it pretty to work out of.

The race car is wide so I built ramps to the height of the wheel wells. (they come right out if I need the height).

Bonus is I can load the quad thru the side door with the car in there. You can see one of the ramps in front of the racecar.

 

 

IM000672.JPG

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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