Sactownog

1933 Dodge BARN FIND - HARLEAN'S COMEBACK

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19 minutes ago, jpage said:

I don't see how braided lines would give any more pressure to your brakes. They would last longer but are not correct for that car. If it were I and since that car is so nice, I would look for a '33 engine and parts to make it correct. My friend and I have located 3 '33 engines in the past week.

After looking into it I'm going to stick with the stock brake lines 60 bucks for factory lines and it keeps it more original ask for the engine for now I'll probably leave it unless I find a matching block then I might just have to pick that up and keep it for future but I still have plans to put a modern running gear underneath this vehicle for reliability and long drives in the future but that's all way down the road

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37 minutes ago, jpage said:

I don't see how braided lines would give any more pressure to your brakes. They would last longer but are not correct for that car. If it were I and since that car is so nice, I would look for a '33 engine and parts to make it correct. My friend and I have located 3 '33 engines in the past week.

I have one down cellar, 33 engine, not the correct engine? That’s a problem , hope the seller told you not original engine? I have 34, numbers matching, original I have started, will get more into it this year after building garage,  I’m thinking mine is worth at least 15, as it sits, but not for sale, 

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2 minutes ago, knobless said:

I have one down cellar, 33 engine, not the correct engine? That’s a problem , hope the seller told you not original engine? I have 34, numbers matching, original I have started, will get more into it this year after building garage,  I’m thinking mine is worth at least 15, as it sits, but not for sale, 

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That's really awesome I have yet to find the numbers on the side of my frame mainly because I still have to clean underneath butt once I find the numbers I may start that search not too sure if I'll end up with the original motor though and no the original owner did not tell me that he replace the engine

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4 hours ago, Sactownog said:

. . . but I still have plans to put a modern running gear underneath this vehicle for reliability and long drives in the future but that's all way down the road

 

More reliable than a drive train that was built from 1933 into the 1970s (1958 or 59 for use in cars, later for use in military vehicles and industrial applications)?

 

In proper repair, that Mopar L-6 engine is as reliable as anything being built today. No where near as much power nor as efficient as today's engines, but definitely a very reliable engine.

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Don’t forget to send for your build Card when you find the numbers, not sure of the address I know I have it somewhere, I’m sure others have it to on here, think it was like $45 to get it, good luck, have fun I know I do working on these old 33 /34 cars, when you get to it I sell replacement spring keepers” for the door handles as well as bolt springs for the headlight bolts,,,also sell replacement ball and spring kits for the cowl vent,,,,,,

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22 hours ago, ply33 said:

 

More reliable than a drive train that was built from 1933 into the 1970s (1958 or 59 for use in cars, later for use in military vehicles and industrial applications)?

 

In proper repair, that Mopar L-6 engine is as reliable as anything being built today. No where near as much power nor as efficient as today's engines, but definitely a very reliable engine.

Chrysler had some of the best prewar engineering out there. It’s a fact that in 1936 the cars of Chrysler Corp. outsold Ford Motor Co! Get that car going and enjoy it in stock trim first. A 33 Dodge is a rare bird.

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I agree, that car is too nice to do any "upgrading" to. I also agree, that if you do any rebuilds and repairs correctly, that car should run as well as it did when new, just don't expect to run 65 down the interstate. If you really want to go fast, buy a later model car! We need to save these historical vehicles as they are getting harder to find in original condition!

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So here is my update. "Maybe I should start a resto thread for this car", anyhow I have ordered a replacement Master Cylinder, new Brake Lines, New Fuel pump, and removed Carburetor to rebuild it. I am cleaning the undercarriage quite a bit but will save most of it for when the new white wall tires get ordered so I can roll car out of garage and pressure wash underneath. I have been shining up the body and chrome. See pictures attached and follow progress on Instagram @Sactownog or #DaloianDesigns 

Cars name is #Harlean

 

This car has sat for 26 years and really shows. But the paint is coming back, the chrome is pitted in areas but shining. So well see what can come back to life. Just have lots of elbow grease to put in. 

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Well, Thought I would update this forum on the progress for anyone who wants to follow. 

I have ordered the new fuel pump, new master cylinder, and new brake lines. Also a carb rebuild kit for the single barrel. 

The dip stick tube that holds the dip stick in my engine broke off. Going to hope to god I can get that out and replaced. 

I am fully detailing the car claybar and buffed, chrome polishing, and I got to say this car came back to life quick. 

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It's amazing what a little elbow grease will  do! Looking very nice.  A great candidate for HPOF judging class. You will really have a lot of fun with this car and expect to spend all day answering questions whenever you take her out. Good luck!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I found this vehicle in December 2017 and got it home on christmas eve. 

I have done a ton of work getting this car back to perfect. 

it was put back on the road in April of 2018 for the 1st show (Good Guys Rod and Custom show @ Del Mar) and parked again in the beginning of 2019 due to some slipping in drive train that was thought to be the transmission but was the rear end slip yoke with a worn tooth. 

 

at this point I have taken out the original 3 speed transmission and purchased a George Asche made 3 speed transmission with an overdrive unit and just had the rear end rebuilt by Oceanside Drive line which cost me $1000.

 

next step is to remove the engine, It leaks and if the transmission and rear end are both fresh, it makes sense to rebuild the engine. 

 

plans there consist of .60 bore, mill head, grind both crank and cam, add dual carb intake and headers. 

 

with that all done, this car should be good to go and I can find my next project, a hot rod since this 33 should not be heavily modified. 

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Fun stuff ain't it.....

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got the floor board of the 33 dodge stripped and painted. 

 

I need to find the board that goes on the engine side of the floor board. any info on that would help. 

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There is a bit of discussion about this in Taylormade's story of Daphne, a 1932 DL. Is it anything like that?

(about p. 66 in Daphne's story.)

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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My flat floorboards are all wood, but I have a two piece toe-board that is made of metal.  I guess they went to all metal floors a year later with the 33s.

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8 hours ago, Taylormade said:

My flat floorboards are all wood, but I have a two piece toe-board that is made of metal.  I guess they went to all metal floors a year later with the 33s.

 

My '33 Plymouth has a metal toe board but the floorboards immediately ahead of and under the front seat are wood.

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Lots of changes between 31 and 34.  For instance, my 32 still has Babbitt bearings but I believe Chrysler products of the same year use insert bearings.

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20 hours ago, ply33 said:

 

My '33 Plymouth has a metal toe board but the floorboards immediately ahead of and under the front seat are wood.

Same as above for 34 Plymouth PE

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22 hours ago, Taylormade said:

Lots of changes between 31 and 34.  For instance, my 32 still has Babbitt bearings but I believe Chrysler products of the same year use insert bearings.

 

Plymouth and, I think, Dodge started using modern thin shell insert bearings in 1933. There are almost no mechanical parts in common between a 1932 and a 1933 Plymouth. I don't have a count but my impression is there are more mechanical parts in common, or at least interchangeable, between a 1933 Plymouth and a 1958 Plymouth than between a 1932 and 1933 Plymouth.

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update: 7-8-19

got rear axle backing plates stripped, primed, and painted with 500 degree paint. 

had to cut my own gasket's for the axle end's. 

 

still need to put brakes back on and get it all mounted to axle. 

 

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