Mr. Bee

Engine hoist lift anchor points

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Anyone know the engine hoist lift (anchor) points for a Dodge 1930's inline 6, with the transmission still attached?

 

Mine is a 201.3 cubic inch motor in a 1939 Dodge D13 but I'd guess they all used similar lift points.

20171218_151702.jpg

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I can easily use a starter bolt or the generator, both on the drivers side.  What do you use on the other side?

 

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You are correct! It's been a while since I pulled a mopar 6. I must have been thinking of how I did the Buick. I think I have pulled a bell housing to engine bolt and found one a little longer and used it with a generator bolt.

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It's odd that there's nothing left on the engine from the factory.  I haven't been able to find a photo of the engine being lowered on the assembly line.

I'll see if I can get a bell housing bolt off.

Thanks.

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If you pick from three points as far away from each other as possible in a triangle the engine should not be able to hurt you. Use a chain, not rope. If you have no experience keep your fingers away from everything. 

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With the tranny still attached life gets much simpler if you use one of those bars with a threaded shaft that lets you adjust the center of lift.

Really helps to keep the load from tilting.

It also spreads the chains apart to a more vertical position so they don't lean on distributors, carbs etc. Although with the flathead six that may bot be that much of an issue.

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Three points...got it.  And yes, a bar is a good idea as I'm trying to avoid parts on the sides. 

Thanks very much. 

 

 

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Mr. Bee said:

Three points...got it.  And yes, a bar is a good idea as I'm trying to avoid parts on the sides. 

Thanks very much. 

 

 

 

 

 

You can get that bar at places like Harbor Freight.

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When I was around heavy civil construction they were called spreader bars. Harbor Freight have a thing they call an engine support bar but "lifting bar" found it.

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I've got some good tubing stock that I use for welding so I'm going to make a custom bar.  But I'll use your comments as a guide.  Cheers.

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I am all for making my own stuff but for forty bucks I would consider this, this one can be adjusted with the load on it.

With the trannu attached it would be to your advantage to be able to run the thing back and forth with ease.

That hand crank is on a threaded rod that make the balance adjustments much easier than setting the load down to go for another hole or chain adjustment to keep the assembly level.

If you can build one that does all that for less than forty bucks go for it.

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Regarding the use of a leveler...you're lucky you can get one for 40 bucks.  I'm in Canada which means a couple weeks to get here plus duties etc and a pricey exchange rate.  

In any case I found a local equipment rental shop that will rent me one for 10 bucks.  All good.

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Thanks for the photo M. White.   That's certainly the preferred way to do it.

 

I'm assuming you didn't have any issues removing the head bolts as well as the exhaust and intake manifold bolts.  Did you use an air impact driver or crack them by hand with a long breaker bar?

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Mr. Bee said:

Thanks for the photo M. White.   That's certainly the preferred way to do it.

 

I'm assuming you didn't have any issues removing the head bolts as well as the exhaust and intake manifold bolts.  Did you use an air impact driver or crack them by hand with a long breaker bar?

 

Actually, the head is held on with studs and nuts. The exhaust studs were loose anyway.  The head must have been off before because it came away easily.  Unfortunately, a previous owner had over tightened the studs and stripped out some of the threads.  To make matters worse, however, he had forced in some metric studs.!  I re threaded the holes with Helicoils and fitted all new studs.  The other problems were mainly to do with cracks - in particular across an exhaust valve seat in the block.  This I had cold stitched and a new seat was machined into the repair.  I also replaced all the valve guides and valves  and just to be safe had the head and block surfaces skimmed. One of the cylinders was cracked so I had a liner fitted and there was a 6" long crack in the water jacket which I have successfully repaired with a "Belzona" two part epoxy resin metal repair kit.  

 

In a previous thread on my engine rebuild I explained how the p.o. had rebored the block but then fitted new standard size pistons!  There was some wear to the bores and some piston slap so I had to get the block rebored and fit new +0.040" pistons.   The biggest problems have been with the crank shaft which appears to have a slight bend in it.  If I had the time and patience I would have the crank crack tested ground and the bearings white metalled  but a guy can only take so much...

 

Best of luck with your project.

 

Ray.

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OMG you're an engine hero.  I would have yelled uncle with the first 6 inch crack!  By the way, does that epoxy work for exhaust manifolds to rebuild a small broken part right where the two header bolts are?

 

I'm hoping my engine and tranny are healthy...I heard the engine run okay but that's not enough to be certain.

 

This morning I'm lifting the whole engine and tranny assembly.

 

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Hero...:) I don't know about that!  

The exhaust manifold on my '26 was in poor shape when I got the car.  It had been broken and repaired with braze.  The repair worked effectively enough but didn't look at all pretty so when I had the chance of a replacement in good condition (sourced through our good friend Ron Lawson in OZ) I jumped at it. I personally would doubt epoxy of any sort would stand up to the extremely high temperatures of to be suitable for an exhaust manifold repair.

 

 From personal experience I have a little word of advice for anyone getting a car down off a trailer.  Watch that you don't catch the end of the exhaust pipe on the ground because not only can it fold up the pipe but it can also break the manifold at the engine!  This happened to my Austin Seven.  Fortunately,  parts are cheap and plentiful.

 

The "Belzona" metal repair that I used is a professional product and being several times stronger than JB Weld is naturally very pricy.  Expect to pay at least $100 for the smallest quantity.  There is quite an extensive range and is aimed at industrial and military users.  So far the water jacket repair is standing up fine but no doubt time will tell.

 

 

 

The water jacket crack prior to repair.

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Edited by R.White (see edit history)

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Engine and tranny are out and safe.  I ended up using the generator mount as per one of the earlier replies.  On the back end I used one of the tranny mount holes.  Worked well.

 

Although I managed to get a leveler I didn't have to use it since it was a simple lift straight off the frame.  I will however use it for the installation later on.

 

As for metal epoxy products there used to be an exhaust manifold epoxy on the market years ago.  I used it on my 85 Chrysler 5th Avenue and it worked for all the years I owned it.  Haven't seen the product in years.

 

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4 hours ago, Mr. Bee said:

Haven't seen the product in years.

Probably contained asbestos! :(

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