NewOldWood

1934 Packard Custom Hunting Car - Restoration

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One of a kind 1934 Packard Super Eight converted at some time early in its life to a hunting car. It will be undergoing a total restoration, my contribution will be primarily woodwork. I'm only a few days into the disassembly so far and it will be a few more before I get to where I can start building anything.  As restoration projects go this one is a pretty good starting point in terms of condition, but being that it was custom coachwork and built in place as opposed to an assembly line process like most others, the process will be slightly different. Should be an interesting project, i'll post pictures and updates as I go.

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Wow, nice car.  Personally, I'd go through it mechanically and show/tour it like it is for a few years, a lot of character there that will be lost in a restoration....

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Woods and Son's body, correct?   I remember when Tom owned this, I thought it was really cool and sold cheap at Hershey.

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2 hours ago, trimacar said:

Wow, nice car.  Personally, I'd go through it mechanically and show/tour it like it is for a few years, a lot of character there that will be lost in a restoration....

On the other hand, a lot of wildlife nesting will get lost in the restoration too. It's been like this for quite a while, time to spruce it up a bit.

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32 minutes ago, alsancle said:

Woods and Son's body, correct?   I remember when Tom owned this, I thought it was really cool and sold cheap at Hershey.

Peter McAvoy and Sons Commercial Auto Bodies, New Rochelle NY did the conversion.

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I really liked this car the first time I layed eyes on it at Tom’s house. It’s realy a unique vehicle. Built on the Packard Individual Custom LeBaron chassis, and cut down from a full custom coachbuilt car, fantastic workmanship, and a true and correct repurposing of an automobile by what I am sure is the original owner. If my life wasn’t so crazy at the time Tom was selling it, I would have purchased it myself. I helped out in a small way to get it running. It’s probably the best converted woody on the planet. I look forward to seeing it’s restoration Good luck, Ed.

 

PS- if I knew it was going to sell for what it did, I would have taken it home myself.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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The front half of the car is stripped down to the frame. The wood in the cowl needs to be replaced, the drivers side is particularly bad as the pictures show. This wood was not only intended to support the windshield bracket but also hold the latch for the suicide hinged door. The drivers floor is quite rotten as well. The passenger side has some rot too but not nearly as bad.

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Thank you for posting about your Packard. I am restoring a 1940 Lasalle woodie. I'm excited about seeing pictures of another custom bodied woodie being restored. All that rotten wood looks so familiar. There is no other car to compare to so you have to decide what the replacements look like based on splinters. I hope you post more pictures as you make progress. I'll post some pictures of mine on a new thread. Tom Boehm

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11 hours ago, mercer09 said:

More rot then the original photos showed.......... yes, it needed to be redone.

 

I agree, now that the innards are seen....what a fun car it will be though....

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The only thing wrong with the car is I don't own it. When Tom had it in Rhode Island I stopped by to play with it, and fell in love...........

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Coming into the home stretch on the old girl, might be time for some pictures. I had to do some repair work to the doors too, but not as extensive as this.

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Thank you for posting these pictures! I really enjoyed them. I did not know you were re wooding the entire body. Was there rot throughout that was not visible in the pictures? I like the nice grain in the wood selected for the panels in the quarterpanel. Great work. I am building the roof of my 1940 Lasalle woodie now. Tom

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Very well done, was it necessary to replace the rear body? It didn’t look too bad when I inspected the car. Where are you located? I have a car that needs wood. Thanks, Ed

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Wow, nice work, but sure a lot of character in that original wood that's been lost.  If it was rotten, I understand, but now it's just a rebodied woodie....

 

Don't mean for that to sound derogatory, but it sure had penache that's gone now.......

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The woodwork has been done for a while now. I started packing up the shop as soon as I finished, so the move has kept me pretty busy. Will be a while before the rest of the work is finished, but this is what it looked like when it left me.

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What a cool car.   This should be on the lawn at Pebble when they do a "hunting car" class.

 

On the flip side,  looking at the pictures reminds me of how overwhelming some of our restorations are.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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Very well done.....impressive craftsmanship.

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