MrEarl

My BUICK SALES and SERVICE GARAGE

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That reminds me of re-roofing a garage years ago. My father-in-law laid up the first sheet of plywood and we than had to trim every edge piece. My father started the other side and there was no trimming involved as everything was square as it could be (building itself wasn't quite nor was a bedroom in the basement of the house that I worked long and hard to set up a waterbed as a spare bed before I put a square in the corner and figured out what was going on). 

 

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Roofing and the framing of roofs is tricky to get perfectly square. With tin if the first piece isn't perfectly square then you're going to gain or loose a tiny bit from one piece to the next or you will gain or loose reveal at the bottom from one end to the other. Some roofers just install it then come back and saw cut the ends off so that it is straight, which is cheating. You have to maintain square, plumb and level from the layout of the footing of a building all the way through the build or else, like you working on your father in law's side, you'll wish they had.  

 

Lets see, I think it was about this time that I had to make the decision as to whether I was going to stain or paint the front windows and door. After thinking back on how long and tedious reglazing those windows was and that if I didn't prime and put a couple of coats of paint on said glazing I would likely be doing it again in 6-7 years I decided to go with paint. Rita and I chose a milk paint color that would be reminiscent of the time period of the building.

 

 

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And I commenced to sanding the 1955 down so it wouldn't shadow through the paint, primed the glazing and gave it all 3 light coats of paint. This wall faces south west so receives full hot sun all year long which is deadly to glazing and paint.

 

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I think it tied in well with the galvanized tin and will look good later when the Buick signage goes up.

 

 

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and then another very rewarding task. Install the  corbels into the brackets. IMG_5011_zpspcvfxy83.jpg

 

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I look forward to visiting Buick Gardens some day and sipping a beverage with you in the vicinity of this fine outbuilding. 

 

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10 minutes ago, Thriller said:

I look forward to visiting Buick Gardens some day and sipping a beverage with you in the vicinity of this fine outbuilding. 

 

 

or two

 

thanks Thriller, you are most welcome anytime!!

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Caught this 1890's roll top desk on CL this last weekend. It will go into the front office area of the BS&S. I had a pretty nice old tanker desk that I was going to use but I think this will fit the decor of the office much better.  It was basically a two owner desk with the first owner being the University of Wyoming which was established in 1886. The desk has a date of 1890 in one of the brass pieces. The gentleman I bought it from bought it from the University when it was moved out of the College of Agriculture in 1969. He was a 23 year old graduate student at the time,  paid $10 for it and he and 5 buds moved it down 3 flights of stairs and back up 2 to his apartment where he said it took up half his bedroom. He was asking $500 but after listening to his story, I countered with $300 and explained I thought that would be a fair profit considering inflation. He laughed and accepted. 

 

 

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8 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Caught this 1890's roll top desk on CL this last weekend. It will go into the front office area of the BS&S. I had a pretty nice old tanker desk that I was going to use but I think this will fit the decor of the office much better.  It was basically a two owner desk with the first owner being the University of Wyoming which was established in 1886. The desk has a date of 1890 in one of the brass pieces. The gentleman I bought it from bought it from the University when it was moved out of the College of Agriculture in 1969. He was a 23 year old graduate student at the time,  paid $10 for it and he and 5 buds moved it down 3 flights of stairs and back up 2 to his apartment where he said it took up half his bedroom. He was asking $500 but after listening to his story, I countered with $300 and explained I thought that would be a fair profit considering inflation. He laughed and accepted. 

 

 

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Nice desks. I like roll top desks.  They have character.  I have one in my office at home.

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Thanks Larry. I have one in my office too, but much smaller than this. I think the roll top will work well in helping to keep the dust and other "settlings" from the back garage off the desk top. 

This one had been kept with the top open for many years and I think the sides with the slots may have warped in some causing the first slats of the top to hang about half way down. I'll be trying to remedy that with some paraffin in the slots first then if that doesn't work, wedging the two ends apart and leaving for a few months to hopefully reverse the warp. My first thought was hit it with some PBBlaster but then thougt better?

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32 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

Hmmmmm,  constructs buildings and handles interior design!   

 

and on occasion turns wrenches, to the left... and has been known in extreme cases of emergency, turned them to the right. 

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20 hours ago, MrEarl said:

and then another very rewarding task. Install the  corbels into the brackets. IMG_5011_zpspcvfxy83.jpg

 

IMG_5006_zpsiohorihw.jpg

 

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Lamar, You are a craftsman  !!!!!!!!

In an  earlier post , we see the finished product .

This post make me feel terrible when my wife said "Can you spare some time to take the trash out ? I'm busy ! "

 

 

 

Yes I did take the trash out . 

Bill

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13 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Thanks Larry. I have one in my office too, but much smaller than this. I think the roll top will work well in helping to keep the dust and other "settlings" from the back garage off the desk top. 

This one had been kept with the top open for many years and I think the sides with the slots may have warped in some causing the first slats of the top to hang about half way down. I'll be trying to remedy that with some paraffin in the slots first then if that doesn't work, wedging the two ends apart and leaving for a few months to hopefully reverse the warp. My first thought was hit it with some PBBlaster but then thougt better?

 

I would probably try bees wax instead of paraffin.

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Thanks Bill.

No question about who the trash man is around our house. I just wish "somebody" would learn how much valuable real estate a non compressed milk jug takes up in a trash can. Second only to 9-10 plastic water bottles!!!  Anybody want to take bets on whose wife can stack trash the highest. Never mind I don't want to take y'all's money.

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33 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

Thanks Bill.

No question about who the trash man is around our house. I just wish "somebody" would learn how much valuable real estate a non compressed milk jug takes up in a trash can. Second only to 9-10 plastic water bottles!!!  Anybody want to take bets on whose wife can stack trash the highest. Never mind I don't want to take y'all's money.

Gotta learn how to pre-cycle then recycle.  Don't buy in containers that can't be recycled. ?

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Let's build some doors. Some big heavy ass doors!

 

Lay 'em out on the floor again, using the old 3-4-5 triangle layout pattern.

 

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To try and keep the weight down as much as possible, used some of the cedar and spruce. You always want to keep spruce weighted down tight as it tends to bend and warp if left loose. Not as much as pine will but certainly more that cedar.

 

 

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Lay the cut to length lumber out on the lines laid out on the floor and mark for the cuts

 

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And make the cuts to half depth

 

 

 

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Tap the block with the hammer

 

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and they all come out together

 

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chisel smooth

 

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sand down

 

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one down, 71 to go  :wacko:

 

 

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A dado blade in a radial arm saw or a table saw would work, but I don't have radial arm saw and handling the longer boards on a table saw would be difficult and more dangerous than the way I did it. It's really not that bad. I use the framing square to guide the saw for the first few cuts yo keep the edge of the cut for sure straight, then just go at it. The thing to ALWAYS remember is not to sit the saw down before the blade stops spinning while the guard is raised. But you're not a real saw man 'til you've watched a circular saw spin around uncontrollably on the floor for a couple seconds. A good quality (Makita) sharp saw blade helps. I got rather good by the 72nd set of cuts. (6 doors X 12 cuts each)

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17 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

The thing to ALWAYS remember is not to sit the saw down before the blade stops spinning while the guard is raised. But you're not a real saw man 'til you've watched a circular saw spin around uncontrollably on the floor for a couple seconds. A good quality (Makita) sharp saw blade helps.

Been down that road a few of times with my Makita.

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The Spring that closes the guard on mine broke some time ago and I have been thinking I should fix it,  but then I start notching rafters, stairs or some other long angled cut and I'm glad I didn't, because it makes starting at an angle a lot easier than fighting with the guard.  Of course I'm the only that uses it, so it's not a problem.   

I have actually notched a tone of stuff this way,  building decks and what not.  

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3 hours ago, MrEarl said:

A dado blade in a radial arm saw or a table saw would work, but I don't have radial arm saw and handling the longer boards on a table saw would be difficult and more dangerous than the way I did it. It's really not that bad. I use the framing square to guide the saw for the first few cuts yo keep the edge of the cut for sure straight, then just go at it. The thing to ALWAYS remember is not to sit the saw down before the blade stops spinning while the guard is raised. But you're not a real saw man 'til you've watched a circular saw spin around uncontrollably on the floor for a couple seconds. A good quality (Makita) sharp saw blade helps. I got rather good by the 72nd set of cuts. (6 doors X 12 cuts each)

When I was in the mortgage loan business, I made a construction loan to a local builder.  I didn't see him for a while but he finally came limping in one day.  He told me that his cicular saw guard didn't close and the saw hit the ground, jumped and landed on his foot. He lost two toes.  

 

Listen to the wisdom of Mr. Earl!

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As an insurance adjuster, this would be a very unique structure to adjust.  To pay someone else (not that you could find someone else) to rebuild this exactly the same way would be impossible.  You can't reasonably estimate on paper what it cost to accumulate the proper materials, and the labor on each part is job-specific.  The best part of that is all of this documentation, that way an insurance company can't just say you can replace it with another standard structure.

 

You could have $20,000 on it or $1,000,000.  I've seen it all, well almost, certainly not to the customization and workmanship of this structure.  Most people are way underinsured on additional structures.

 

Insurance is a very personal thing, and I certainly don't want a response--just a random thought since it's what I do.

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and thanks for that response Billy, good to hear your professional thoughts. At the point of it being dried in and about 90% complete on the exterior we had it insured and furnished lots of pictures. I realize it could never be replaced for even the amount we had it insured at that time and also realize that after the completion of the interior at which time we will have it reappraised,  that we will only be deeper in that hole. We also realize we will never see the return of our dollars spent and it will be impossible to put a price on the sweat equity when time comes to sell the farm. But just like our old cars, if you let yourself be guided solely by the value or your restorations you wouldn't be in this hobby. It's all about dreams and love for Buick's, what else can I say. But again, thanks for your professional thoughts.

 

So lets get back to them HAD's. You may recall some of the old heart pine bead board and flooring I salvaged from the 1890's farm house. I will be using some of it to build the three sets of barn doors, one set for the front and two for the back.

 

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So laid the frame boards back out on the pattern marked on the floor being sure to stay perfectly on the lines on all four sides and corners

 

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Then glue and screw them together

 

 

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I always like to angle the screws in somewhat opposing each other when trying to get the most holding strength. Not sure if it matters, just something I do with screw and frame nailing.

 

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and cross bracing.

just lay out tangents of the cross brace piece on the frame

 

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Mark a center line on the brace board

 

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use ol' yeller to run the line down the center

 

 

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Lay that under the frame, line it up and mark for your angled cuts

 

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C clamp 'em down and cut 'em

 

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leave the lines to make sure they're gutentite

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and glue and toe nail 'em in

 

 

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before beginning to face them with the bead board, take the opportunity to mark out and cut the salvaged blue board insulation for placing inside the frame later on.

 

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I signed onto the  AACA Buick site to learn how to repair a Buick.  I instead learned how to frame a door!!!  This site has it all!!!!   God love it. :)

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