MrEarl

My BUICK SALES and SERVICE GARAGE

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What a treasured find and it sounds like it came just in time.  The old circle saws are dying with the old men who ran them. Band mills are fast and automated and waste less but they can’t leave that kind of signature.  That close grain look is amazing and perfectly suited to adorn the show side.  Divine intervention indeed!

 

Cypress, called wood of the Pharaohs for its incredible longevity and use in ancient coffins, will age to a timeless silver and could last a Buick century with no topical attention - ever.

 

Very nice!

 

 

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10 hours ago, MrEarl said:

My sweet Reet cleaning the finished windows and blowing me a kiss, she's gotta love me...

 

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She must to put up with all that ???

 

That said, for a night on the town, you clean up better than expected ?

 

Nice work. I don't have the patience nor energy to be doing this. Remind me not to show this to Suzanne. 

 

Theres a beach party planned for Da Nang, so perhaps it will be at Red Beach. I haven't qualified for that yet though. 

 

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I think what comes next was the most excited I had been about any stage of the construction so far, putting the siding up. My wife and I had sided about half of our house back in '87 after I told the siding contractor to hit the road after coming home from work one day and finding numerous pieces not level and some of the trim boards not beveled as I had instructed.
The old sawmill cypress was very dry after being stacked and cured for 30 some odd years. I decided not to use the nail gun but instead drill for every nail and use the siding nails that were left over from building the house. Nailing siding requires keeping a close eye on the nail and board as the nail approaches the wood then meets it. Another tap to barely bend the wood and it is good. I didn't feel comfortable using a nail gun to do that.
Lots of cutting and fitting around the doors and windows made for a slow go. The Swede was still helping and if I remember correctly it took about 3 days to complete.

 

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This was being done toward the end of the summer, September-October. The daytime temps ran from the 60s in the morning to the low 90's in the late afternoon. So work generally started by no later than 8:00 o'clock. The building faces south west and as the sun started getting low in the afternoon the heat reflecting off the foil faced sheathing made for an early 4:00 o'clock quitting time and some salted neck Rolling rock with lime and a few screwdrivers.

 

 

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That front walk door just loves that siding.  What is the detail board that lies horizontally above the 2X trim on your doors and windows?  It looks like it went on with the siding.  Is this something on a rake to drip water away from the underlying trim?

 

Edited by JoelsBuicks (see edit history)

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10-4, it helps keep water from tracing back and under the last piece of siding and the trim. And I just like the finished look it gives. I started using it on the house and continued on the old barn and now here.

 

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I then hit it with some Flood CWF-UV sealer by roller then brush it in. Repeat.  CWF is not the same it use to be as when I applied it to the house. I gave the siding 2 coats and the trim three. Likely the last time I will apply it. The old pine trim is beginning to need another coat already and I will probably try and hit it every 3-4 years.

 

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On January 29, 2018 at 11:06 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

 

That front walk door just loves that siding.

 

 

Not sure the siding is gonna still love the door later though, stay tuned for what was a gut wrenching decision. :wacko: 

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About this time I started planning and designing in my head how to build and what to use on the front brow ie the metal awning/overhang. Went through the barn attic and found these corbels that had been left over from when we had built our house back in '87. I had removed them from a 3 story house that had been built in the 1870's and I got in on the demolition of. I pulled each one of them using two ladders tied together with lots of nylon chord and duct tape. The ladders shook the entire time I was pulling the corbels due to my legs shaking.


I figured out what I wanted and selected the best and took the rest to an antique shop and sold them. Which was good as my BS&S building fund was almost depleted. This picture is of what I sold and is at the antique shop. The antique shop owner is an expert on and deals in heart pine. He was in awe of the pieces and said he had never before seen such nice pieces and that they had probably all been cut out of one 2-300 year old pine. So in other words the wood in the corbels I am using is likely 3-400 years old.

 

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I stripped them using a combination of stripper, a heat gun, scrapers, wire brushes, sand paper and LOTS of tedious time.

 

 

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Thanks Gary, appreciate it. It was exciting seeing the grain come out from under that old paint. The will be shielded pretty well from the elements but I will need to reseal them every 3-4 years.

 

So at about this time Olof,  the Swede gets all his cars that he had purchased from everywhere from Canada to California finished shipping into Buick Gardens so we turned our attention, carpentry and engineering skills and brawn to loading up three shipping containers with 9 trucks and cars. We precut timbers and pine 2x10s in order to build ramps and platforms in the middle of the containers to hold a car up and over the hoods of ones fore and aft of it. Everything had to be prebuilt to pretty exact dimensions so we could assemble them in short order as we were only allowed 4 hours for each load before an extra delay fee was charged. We built portable stanchions/sawhorses as supports for ramps up to the platforms. These weren't small cars and trucks we were loading either and it was a good thing Olof is small and agile as I personally would never have fit in the areas he needed to to cinch all the cars down well and proper. It all went off like clock work, everything fit perfectly and we tipped the tow truck driver a carton of cigarettes for his patience. The only guffaw that happened was on the first day when the truck arrived, we opened the door and discovered the container floor was metal instead of wood as we had ordered. So we set about running a parallel set of 2xs along the floor at the walls then crosspieces at each set of front and back wheels to have something to cinch the wheels too. 

 

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These were the first set of stanchions we built. After we saw that they worked, after the truck left with the first load, we built another set for the next day. It worked even better since that truck had wooden floors.

 

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I had hauled this 76 up from Mobile about 3 years earlier and had stored it in a goat shed for him til he arrived. We pulled it out of the shed, he got it tagged and got a drivers license and he drove it around Georgia for the couple months he was here. I had been driving the blue 85 Estate Wagon and had actually gotten a bit attached to it, hence my recent acquisition of the 79 Southern Belle.

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One of the most difficult things to do was to get the car centered and in perfect alignment on the rollback then guide the driver of the rollback perfectly in line with the container. There were a few inches to spare with the cars... IMG_4630%20-%20Copy_zpssd9jlm1w.jpg

 

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This was the fun one to load. But to add to the fun, notice the spare overdrive rear end hanging beneath the pick up. And in the bed of the pickup are doors we had pulled off a van in a salvage yard for one of his vehicles already in Sweden.

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1.5 inch clearance either side, and drove this one in.

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Quite a fun experience. Olof left shortly after the containers did and was home in time to receive the containers. Reported back that they all arrived just as they had been packed safe and sound.

Really enjoyed his visit, all the help with the garage and the experience of loading shipping containers. I will say I would not do it for a living.

 

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I thought I could pack things pretty good for shipping,  but he has me beat.  I've learned though,  I only buy small stuff now if I have to ship it.  Good work. 

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It's interesting to see things move from here to GA to Sweden. The 1958 wagon used to belong to a friend locally. 

 

Good to know things arrived safely. 

 

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Will be needing some substantial brackets to support this brow...

Bought some 20' pieces of 1/4" X 3 inch flat stock and had a local fab shop cut and weld. I layered them all together and drilled some bolt holes.

 

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Got out my rustification mix

 

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and rustified them

 

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After the initial rusting was done I washed the salt and vinegar residue off.

 

 


 

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Built some wooden brackets out of the old growth pine from the chicken houses. Glued, screwed and angle nailed together. Sealed them with 2 coats of CWF.

 

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Hit the Victorian Corbels with a couple coats of CWF

 

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Rustified the heads of some 2 1/2" lag bolts with a vinegar and salt brine. Shiny steel bolt heads would have stuck out like a sore thumb

 

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and used them to bolt the metal brackets to the wooden brackets. Temporarily sat the corbel in to see how it would look. I have been concerned a little about the scale of the corbel to the bracket and the bracket to the building. So far it isn't looking too bad.

 

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And mounted the brackets to the building with 8" lag bolts.

 

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Next task was to go through all the salvaged chicken house corrugated tin and pull enough good sheets to complete the brow and clean them with a mixture of 4:1 water/muriatic acid.

 

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Then run a ledger board for the top of the tin to rest on

 

 

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Then a front double one along the tops of the brackets for the lower part of the tin to rest on. Both top and bottoms were cut at angles so tin would lay flush on top and not just on the edges.
 

 

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Measure and cut all the pieces to the exact same length with my 4.5 inch grinder. Stacked and cut three at a time.

 

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Lay them all out and hit them with some straight muriatic acid in random places to give them some reckless abandon rust potential. I would spray it on, scrub with a brush for a minute then rinse thoroughly.

 

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Did you consider, either in planning or retrospectively, putting a chamfer on the ends of those brackets?  It is a detail that you used on the overhangs on the upper steps of the facade and I thought it was quite clever.

 

I really like the look of those corbels combined with the brackets.  It would have been real easy to skip that part and brace the edge of the awning back to the building and call it good.  But, the design element would have been lost and the “underneath” view not nearly as attractive and intriguing. I thought about this also on that inside corner you made on the backside.  There’s something about that road less travelled.

 

I think my right brain atrophied in college and I never recovered.  I couldn’t come up with this but at least I can appreciate the look.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Did you consider, either in planning or retrospectively, putting a chamfer on the ends of those brackets?  It is a detail that you used on the overhangs on the upper steps of the facade and I thought it was quite clever.

 

I really like the look of those corbels combined with the brackets.  It would have been real easy to skip that part and brace the edge of the awning back to the building and call it good.  But, the design element would have been lost and the “underneath” view not nearly as attractive and intriguing. I thought about this also on that inside corner you made on the backside.  There’s something about that road less travelled.

 

I think my right brain atrophied in college and I never recovered.  I couldn’t come up with this but at least I can appreciate the look.  

 

 

 

I actually did consider the chamfer but it would have required cutting the 1/4" flat bar stock to the same shape. Considering that,  I just told myself that the squared off ends would make the whole thing look more stronger and bolder which, after all was said and done I think it does and I was pleased with the decision. I really like the way the corbel brackets dresses up the front of the building and ties it into the house which has some of the same corbels. A dreamer might think that the old Victorian farm house and the Buick dealership building were designed and built at the same time, maybe somewhere around the turn of the century. ;) 

As always thanks for your appreciation Joel.

 

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50 minutes ago, 39BuickEight said:

Those corbels are a sight to behold.  You just don’t find wood with a grain that tight anymore. 

 

Thanks Billy, I agree. Thankfully much of the old structural timber used in factories and warehouses is today being resawn into lumber for flooring and furniture etc. 

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53 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

 

I actually did consider the chamfer but it would have required cutting the 1/4" flat bar stock to the same shape. Considering that,  I just told myself that the squared off ends would make the whole thing look more stronger and bolder which, after all was said and done I think it does and I was pleased with the decision. I really like the way the corbel brackets dresses up the front of the building and ties it into the house which has some of the same corbels. A dreamer might think that the old Victorian farm house and the Buick dealership building were designed and built at the same time, maybe somewhere around the turn of the century. ;) 

As always thanks for your appreciation Joel.

 

 

 Question is , which century?  Looking good, my friend.

 

  Ben

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I've never been able to keep up with what century we're in. Except for the '54 3 speed one.  Thanks for the good words, buddy.

 

Back to finishing up the brow. After they were all cleaned up and cut to size

 

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Squared the first one up best I could and start laying and screwing the bad boys up.

 

 

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and danged if they all didn't come out nice and square with each other and straight along the front.
 

 

 

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bend me up some 20 ft long pieces of flashing
 

 

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and insert in one end and slide along underneath the upper tin siding

 

 

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and there she be. Brow complete.

 

 

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I've used that same process to ben stainless steel sheet into trim for my 32 Ford to go around the windshield for the inside garnish molding.  Once I got it bent to a 90,  I was able to hand pound it over the rest of the way to make it look like a conventional piece of molding.  It worked surprisingly well. 

Looking good.  

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