MrEarl

My BUICK SALES and SERVICE GARAGE

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On 12/18/2017 at 10:43 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

 I have to

ask about what kind of help you have?   It’s tough to run a rod and transit by yourself but you could probably do it.

 

You gotta be fast. Stand the pole up, balance it, get back to the transit before it starts leanin, take and record the shot then run back to the rod before it hits the ground. It's really tough on a windy day. The really tough trick though,  is taking a shot on the plumb bob string, just hold the target up with the plumb bob dangling over the point, let it go then get back to the transit QUICK. Problem is the string retracts so fast into that target you have really got to move.  Seriously, Rita makes a good rodman woman. But do not, I repeat do not ever tell her "here you take the dumb end of the tape measure"

 

Thanks Joel for the kind and appreciative words. And yes sir, that is indeed a peach tree you see. Given to me by some folks at work when I retired. It has a bunch of peaches but they're all wormy as I don't spray it in the early spring.

 

 

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On 12/19/2017 at 12:31 AM, Marty Roth said:

Lamar,

 

The more I see of your efforts, the more impressed I am of your talent, your planning, your skill, your dedication. You've been monitoring our website, sharing advice, sharing your parts and methodology, and now in addition to your beautiful and amazing home, pond, landscaping, and garage, this project really caps it all - especially with the re-purposing of salvageable materials which are both great for the job, and also add to the look and feel of the entire property. You and Rita are a credit to yourselves, as well as to the hobby in general - just wanted to let you know how much Dale and I appreciate it. 

 

Wishing you, as well as all our Buick community, the very best for Christmas, and good health for the coming year.

 

Wow Marty, your and Joels kind words have got to be some of the nicest anyone has ever said about me. Actually very touching! Thank you very much. Please know you and Dale are invited to stop by again anytime you are near. We so enjoyed y'all's visit last time. And a Merry Christmas to you and Dale too.

 

 

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Excepting malathion, I figured out how to make most of my pesticides and fungicides for peaches- still costs a mint and still have some worms.

 

Dad always had me hold the “dumb end of the tape” but he taught me so much about this work, like the value of batter boards and how to set up a level to minimize error.  He frequently repeats that it’s easy to build a building plumb level and square but it takes a real craftsman to build one that isn’t.  He has a few other sayings but are not suitable for this forum.  Maybe most of all, I learned to not fear any of it.

 

I’m looking forward to the coming installments.  Be warned that they do, in a way, expose some of the softer underbelly.  Why I learned a little about you by just looking at the tapered legs on your sawhorses!  I also want to echo the comments made by others and say thanks for what you do for the forum and the hobby.

 

Have a great Christmas!

 

 

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Wow, after all that flowery stuff, a simple man has no chance.:P.   Seriously, Lamar and Joel, you two do some great work.  I cannot even imagine how one starts.   But I can put a semi-truck down an alley with six inches to spare on each side!

 

  Wormy peaches?  Just eat around the worm.

 

 

   MERRY CHRISTMAS, guys.

 

  Ben

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What's worse than biting into a peach and finding a worm?

 

Biting into a peach and finding half a worm.  

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Dang,sorry I haven't replied sooner guys,  looks like the "follow auto notifications" haven't been working. 

 

On 12/20/2017 at 11:04 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

Dad always had me hold the “dumb end of the tape” but he taught me so much about this work, like the value of batter boards and how to set up a level to minimize error.  He frequently repeats that it’s easy to build a building plumb level and square but it takes a real craftsman to build one that isn’t.

 

It takes a REAL craftsman to build onto an existing building that wasn't built plumb, level and square. I learned that while working on our first house, an old Queen Anne that had been moved. No pls anywhere,  just character.

 

On 12/21/2017 at 7:50 AM, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

But I can put a semi-truck down an alley with six inches to spare on each side!

 

My dad was a truck driver and I remember to this day from when I was maybe 4-5,  his correcting me on backing one of my toy trucks, saying you can't turn that sharp, you're jack knifing it!!!   Has come in handy over the years when backing the car trailer, can't wait to see how I do with a 24 footer behind the wagon.

 

My sweet Reet just walked in from work, time for some wine and a stroll around the Gardens. Will try and get back later this evening with another "installment". 

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Well forget that, after she looks at me like I'm crazy and says "you haven't been out of the house all day have you, the pond is frozen over and it's 2 degrees above freezing out there"  But to defy her, I grabbed a couple shots of antifreeze (Bulleit whisky and Coke) and me, Elvis and my cat named Kowpi walked out and hung out in the garage for awhile.

 

So back to the build. But first, some may think I'm being so ecologically savvy by re-purposing all this lumber and stuff when all it is really about is

 

 

 

So time for the trusses to go up. Since these were 40 ft long trusses I hired a crane at the minimum rate of $450 for 4 hours and the roofers who had installed the tin roof on my house a couple years ago to help.

 

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The cradles I had set for the trusses made quick work of setting the trusses.

 

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Trusses set and the crane gone within 1 1/2 hour of starting.No mercy from the crane operator, still charged the full $450. But he was good. The roofers didn't spend a lot of time getting the trusses perfect while the crane was here. The cradles and one or two temp 2x held them in place. They plumbed and set a couple and then headed off to lunch.

 

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While they were gone I checked the plumb on the ones they set and the first one was good but not the second one. So before they returned I fixed the second one and made a jig for them to use on the rest of them.

 

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The first day they got all the trusses and the purlins set. The next morning they started installing the blue board insulation and the tin. I had them set the purlins 2 ft apart so the salvaged blue board would fit between. The blue board is 2'x8', 1 inch thk Extruded Polystyrene and has an Rvalue of 5. I paid $1.00 per sheet and have enough to insulate the roof and walls with 2 layers. (in addition to regular sheathing and batt insulation)  Note here also that I had installed some of the salvaged pine 2 x 4's as girts for the siding tin. I spaced them 2 ft apart vs on center so that the blue board insulation would fit in between them.

 

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Roof was on and roofers gone by a little after noon. I was not as satisfied with their quality of work on the barn roof as I was the house. I had the building (posts and ends of the truss carriers) square to within 1/4 inch but in the end the tin overhang (that which hangs past the bottom perlin) progresses from the planned 2 inch on one end to almost 3 inches on the other. Oh well, I can live with it.

 

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a better view of the girts

 

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I am so much farther along with the build than I am here and it gets hard remembering the sequence of the build and correspinding pictures so bear with me if I forget and have to come back to something

 

*hmmmmm, farther along....never miss a chance to let a thought help pull up a song. This one by The Byrds.....with Gram Parsons...
 

 

 

So after the roof was on it was time to start preparing for the concrete floor. After fine grading the subgrade to within 1/4" of grade, I spread and leveled 3 inches of gravel and cut out two 5' x 5' areas for installation of a lift in the future. photo4_zpsb3f89f37.jpg

 

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Placed a double layer of 6 mil poly and taped the seams to act as a moisture barrier. 
 

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Set the front and back form boards and drove iron pins on 10 ft centers with tops at final floor grade to act as screed guides. They were driven 2-3 inches below top of concrete prior to troweling of concrete

 

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Just need to remove the front 2x8 form board and ready for the first of 4 1/2 loads of 3500 psi concrete. Poured 5 inches thick over WELL compacted red Georgia clay, no rebar, no wire, no fiber. Ran a proctor on the soil and 2 density tests as it was being filled and one on top after it had sat a couple of months during rainy season and got 98-100% density on all so I think I will be alright.

Started on the back side, made one pour one day, installed an expansion joint and made the other the next day.

 

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The back pad only got hand troweling and broom finish.

 

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I had gone to the concrete plant and measured the height of an empty truck to insure clearance under the trusses. It measured 12'. I had 12' 6" clearance BEFORE I installed the 3 inches of stone so that meant I now had 3" of clearance. The dispatcher told me that was the tallest of the trucks the had so figured no problem. He also told me they are the same height loaded as unloaded. I found that hard to believe but when checked upon delivery and as the truck pulled out after unloading, there didn't appear to be any difference loaded or not.

 

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I kept close watch on them while screeding to ensure they used the pins I had provided them and drove them in before finishing. I watched for puddling of the set water. After it was power troweled and hand blue troweled I hosed it down and didn't have more than a couple of 1/8 in deep bird baths over the whole thing. I can live wit dat.

 

 

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You saved a bundle reusing that insulation.  I’ve been pricing it at the local big boxes and it isn’t cheap.  It’s too bad about the roof running out of square.  It takes very little effort to make some measurements and check point marks and make that come out right. You spend all that time to get the structure square only to have the roofers do that.  Maybe they know that these sort of things are really easy to forget about in short time. 

 

I bet bet you thought long and hard trying save the crane bill. You want to save where you can but some things are just out of reach and the older we get the more out of reach they get. The pics show that you’re on a pretty good slope - I didn’t realize that from the previous pics although you did have to bring in a lot of fill.

 

lookin’ good and thanks again for sharing.

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10 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

 Maybe they know that these sort of things are really easy to forget about in short time. 

 

one inch in 40 ft., no telling where it came from. You're right, I hadn't really thought about it anymore until I started thinking back and writing this. Hell, from the ground you can't even see it anyway.

 

10 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

I bet bet you thought long and hard trying save the crane bill. You want to save where you can but some things are just out of reach and the older we get the more out of reach they get.

 

Right again! I considered borrowing a fork lift or renting a material lift. But that would have taken men working on ladders on either end of the truss and me straddling those trusses like you see those guys that do it every day doing. Some things are well worth the money spent. That crane and the roof crew were that for sure. 

 

10 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

some things are just out of reach and the older we get the more out of reach they get.

 

Music with poetry that stirs the soul is the one way to pass on to others, the feelings and emotions you are feeling in the moment. Those words Joel just wrote brought this song to mind. 

 

......using ideas as my maps
"We'll meet on edges, soon," said I
Proud 'neath heated brow.
Ah, but I was so much older then,
I'm younger than that now.

 

Click it if you like, if not just pass it by.....

 

 

 

 

The material for the walls. Salvaged 2 x 6's 2 ft on center. This is some of the solid but more weathered boards, saving the best looking for facing the interior walls.

 

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As an example of "using ideas as my maps"  I found some nice little 2 ft wide pine french doors on sale at Lowes for $69 each and will use them for windows on the east side of the building and also on the interior separating the "service" area from the "sales" area. After building frames for the windows, I got started on the walls.

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These old pine 2X6's are HEAVY and by the time I incorporated the window frame into the 10' wide X 12' tall sections it was about all I could do to raise them into place by myself. Keep in mind this is a pole barn, there's typically no stud walls in a pole barn. These studs were not really structural but rather something to nail all the interior 2 x 6 wall board to and to accommodate the blue board insulation.

 

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Also incorporated spaces for thru the wall air conditioners and combo AC and heat in the office area. Funds just not there for central or split system heat pumps. IMG_0477_zps2a53603f.jpg

 

The west side was easy, no windows!!!

 

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and from the outside...

 

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Thanks Ben. I'm sure lots, probably most are viewing this on cell phones and not able to see in detail nor hear the music well enough to appreciate some of it. I really need to catch up on here to where I actually am on the build, which is basically that the outside is 95% complete, so I can start entering my activities daily. But anyway, thanks for following and the kind words. 

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I think those 2x6’s are going to make a great looking wall.  It will be interesting to see how you run them.  I’m amazed at how straight they are.  I’m curious about the wall height of 12 feet.  I think it will give you that “voluminous” look and feel.  Is that what you are after or do you need that for displaying old signs, etc?  I noticed that most of the building will have a vaulted ceiling (the show room) and the upfront office ceiling is flat.  I’m guessing maybe an 8-ft ceiling there and storage above that?

 

It has a very solid look to it.

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If voluminous means very open and airy, yea I guess that is what I am going for :P. Also for the purpose of accommodating a lift hopefully some day. And yea I'm sure I'll have the walls covered something. Hell with the 2x6 pine wall boards I could hang a 322 block from it if I wanted to. :D The office area ceiling will be at 12 ft and I wanted that to give the feel of the old show rooms. There will be a big old ceiling fan in the center and a couple of chandelier style lights on both sides of it.  I did once consider making a storage room over it but then looked around me and thought to myself "what do I need more storage area for, I'm downsizing remember".  

 

I kept thinking about that tin overhang difference and after thinking back that I never did actually measure it, I got a ladder out and measured it today. Actually only about 5/8 to 3/4 inch difference in that 40 ft run so as ol Guy Clark says, hell maybe I can paint over that but (now that I told ya about it)  I can't hide it from you :lol:

 

 

 

 

so here's a few shots of the chicken house salvage blue board (bb)  insulation starting to go up. This is Styrofoam brand Extruded Polystyrene insulation with an R value of 5 per inch. What I am using is 1 inch thick. Hosed it down with a water hose and to answer the question before it is asked, nah, it doesn't smell like a chicken house. I spaced the girts 2 ft apart instead of on center so the 2'x8'x1" pieces of blue board would fit between. Then I taped what gap there was between the girt and bb

 

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The smaller frame outs are for thru the wall air conditioners, one on each side, staggered, and then up front will be a combination A/C Heater for the office area.

 

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And then on top of the girts I installed 1/2 inch foil faced polystyrene sheathing, leaving 1/2 inch air space between the sheathing and the blue board. The southwest wall gets strong summer sun in the summer so foil facing will act as a radiant barrier. With the 1" bb and the 1/2" sheating I should have an R value of about 8-9. I taped the seams of the sheathing also as this will be my air barrier and the fiberglass batt insulation will breathe from the in side of the building. My plan is to add yet another 1" thk sheet of bb on the inside of the girts, then a 1 inch air space then 3 1/2 inches of un-faced fiberglass batt insulation. The walls will be 1 1/12 inch pine boards. Altogether I should have about R-28 walls. Maybe.

 

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Lamar,

 

That "out building" from the original Buick garage looks great. You are doing great work.

 

On hiring the crane, I agree that sometimes there are things that make more sense to hire than do yourself.   Smart move.

 

Up here I need to hire a crane (I am on the schedule for spring) to move some semi trailers.  Up here, to get the crane to my property I am required to pay a $500.00 fee to drive it over about 2.5 miles of county road.  Nothing on the truck, just the crane.  Crazy but need to get the trailers moved.

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Thanks Larry.

 

5 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

Up here, to get the crane to my property I am required to pay a $500.00 fee to drive it over about 2.5 miles of county road.

 

Geeze ' $500 !!!! So who gets the $500, the county, state or who.

 

17 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

I think it will give you that “voluminous” look and feel.

 

a bit more on the height and insulation  In Georgia, it typically does not get that terribly cold. Hardly ever single digits, teens maybe once or twice a winter and lows mostly in the mid 20's/30's. This winter being an exception with teens and twenties every day since Christmas practically. But for what the blue board cost me ($1 sheet) plus the ease of installing it and the fact I am only going to be heating and cooling with thru the wall air conditioners and ceiling mounted electric heaters I figured I better use the salvaged insulation to as big of an advantage as I can. I am also using it in double layers on the roof and then R-19 fiberglass in the ceiling. I can't take the heat like I use to and hopefully what with the insulation I am doing along with the 12 to 15 ft vaulted ceilings and using floor and ceiling fans to keep air moving I will not need to run the AC's much.

 

 

 

And on this Sunday morning

 

 

 

Before starting to put the tin on the sides, since I am not enclosing the eaves which will hopefully give good ventilation and keep the ceiling cooler in the summer, figured I'd put up some rodent (squirrel, bat, bird and racoon) barrier. I cut some 1/4" hardware cloth into 9 " strips and stapled in between each truss between the bottom purlin and top of truss carrier

 

 

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Mr. Earl,   You are doing a great job. Beautiful shop. How are you going to keep your A/C from going out the screen vents? I can't believe you are doing all this work in this 25-30 degree weather. When I lived in N/J I put up a pole barn and put 6 clear or semi clear roof panels to let in natural light  and when I put up my 36 X 48 garage here in SC I put in the clear roof panels also.  Keep up the good work and the pictures.

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Thanks for stopping by and your kind words Gary. Firstly, all the work thus described was actually done a couple or so years ago,  I am playing catch up on telling it. Regarding the screen vents, there will be a tin ceiling attached to the bottom cord of the scissor trusses, so there will be no air coming into or going out of the roof. Hopefully   :lol:

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After taking care of the tree rats with the hardware cloth up top, ran some ground rat guard along the bottom. Tha's a grade string line in orange. Another great benefit of the rat guard was that it made holding and screwing up the tin so easy. Not finding all the pictures I know I took of putting up the siding on the sides.

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My good friend the 8 ft level taking a rest break

 

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Inspector Kowpi holding a concrete block down

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My help finally arrived to help temporarily wrap the end sheet of tin around the corner to keep it from cutting somebody.

 

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Hmmmm need to get some stone down to keep the red Georgia clay from staining the tin don't I....
Ran some poly along the treated 2x8 base board up to the rat guard and out about 3 feet to help keep the rain water from migrating back under the slab. 4 feet of the stone will be left exposed as a poor mans sidewalk and the rest was feathered out to allow better drainage after backfilling over it with topsoil. It also has positive drainage parallel with the building.

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Happened to notice the sawed contraction/control joints doing their job

 

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And Elvis coolin it in the shade.

 

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OK, here is how I trimmed out the windows. I will be installing some french doors as windows hinged at the top to open to the inside. I just used the old rule of starting at the bottom and covering up as you go to keep the water moving. I furnished the metal works company where I bought the tin for my roof with some sketches and dimensions of how to form the tin and it all worked out fine. The only screw up being, I ordered plain galvanized but got galvalume, hence the difference in color. I can paint over that. (Not literally).

 

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A lot of the work so far has been pretty mundane. Turning the corner and getting started on the back wall was a bit more thrilling. Found a good deal on some scaffolding on CL that made quick and safe erection of the back wall go pretty smoothly. One man, one board, one nail at a time.

 

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And get some colors up

 

 

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and some good ol pine 2x12 door headers

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Peace brother...

 

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Truss braces filled in and angled double 2x6s to catch the roofline of the welding shed

 

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Before the tin goes on the back, comes the sheathing. 'fore that though need to install some guards to keep the tree rats from getting in between the truss and tin. Cut some 18 inch flashing in half while still rolled up then rolled it out and cut into measured lengths to fit between the purlins.

 

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Got the back man door in

 

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