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My BUICK SALES and SERVICE GARAGE


MrEarl

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2 hours ago, 95Cardinal said:

Lamar, I have spent hours reading - and listening - to this entire thread this week.

It is one of my favorite threads of all time, from ANY forum.

 

Your vision, skills, workmanship and work ethic are incredible!

Congratulations!

 

I think the BS & SG is truly a work of art...and you really know your music, too.

 

Hope the knee is back to 100%!

Joe

 

Wow, I think tha's the best compliment I've ever been paid, THANK YOU Joe.  I really MUST get back inside the garage and get that completed. I have all the materials gathered and it is just a matter of making time and being physically able to climb scaffolding and ladders. The knee is back to 98% but now I'm going through physical therapy and getting spinal injections for lower back degenerative disc disease. At least tha's what the doctors say.  I think it came about from sitting on my ass too long while I was getting the knee fixed and all I really need to do is get back to work.  We will see.

Thanks again for the kind words, they may be just what I need to get going on it again.

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2 hours ago, Elpad said:

I had the opportunity and pleasure to have been able to visit the “Buick Gardens” in couple of occasions. On the first trip, ground was being broken for the Sales and Service Center and on the second trip, the center was almost finish. I echo the words of 95 Cardinal and must add that Lamar’s ongoing enthusiasm has spread throughout all of the ones that compose and participate on this and other forums. Thanks Mr. Earl for sharing your place history and related adventures. Regards to your other 1/2 that makes all your dreams come true. Saludos “We”!

 

Thanks Al, for the kind words and for bringing back the the memories of your visits, they were a lot of fun. Y'all are welcome back anytime, and bring your carpenters belt 😄

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20 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

and you really know your music, too.

 

 

which reminds me, I haven't posted any music in awhile. With all the talk of aches and pains of getting old, this song might help...

 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

 

Wow, I think tha's the best compliment I've ever been paid, THANK YOU Joe.  I really MUST get back inside the garage and get that completed. I have all the materials gathered and it is just a matter of making time and being physically able to climb scaffolding and ladders. The knee is back to 98% but now I'm going through physical therapy and getting spinal injections for lower back degenerative disc disease. At least tha's what the doctors say.  I think it came about from sitting on my ass too long while I was getting the knee fixed and all I really need to do is get back to work.  We will see.

Thanks again for the kind words, they may be just what I need to get going on it again.

 

Sounds like a time for a fried Spam lunch.

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On 11/15/2020 at 7:11 PM, Larry Schramm said:

 

Sounds like a time for a fried Spam lunch.

 

On 11/15/2020 at 7:16 PM, MrEarl said:

 Would that be plain or with bacon or jalapeno? 

 

OOOOHHHHH, yeah! I'm in.

Bacon AND jalapeno, please!

Sounds great to me!

Edited by 95Cardinal
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  • 1 month later...

Haven't posted any progress photos in awhile so thought I'd post a few while waiting on parts for the Century.

 

The compressor will be in the welding shed so ran some 3/4 Rapid Air compressor lines in the walls. I'll continue it into the area where the work benches will be later.

 

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Installed another big eye bolt in the double door that goes into the main work area for use in lifting engines and other heavy stuff for loading etc..

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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and some insulation. All in all I now have - 1/2" Foil face sheathing @ R-3 + 2 layers of 3/4" Extruded Polystyrene Board @ R-5 each + 4" Faced fiberglass at R-13 plus a couple of air spaces so the wall should have an approx R rating of 26, not counting maybe a couple more that will come when I put up the roofing felt and 1 1/2" pine boards. Sufficient for Georgia climate I think

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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actually before the insulation went in, I had a licensed electrician friend come over and help with laying out the electrical and I ran all the drops in. I'll have him come back and do the actual receptacle and light installations.

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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Hooking up the electric in the boxes is the easy part.  I just put an outside inlet in for a Generator and have to move almost everything down in the panel to put the interlock in at the top.  We don't lose power much but I figure it can't hurt to be prepared.  Could also use the Generator to run my compressor and blast cabinet if I don't get around to wiring the garage any time soon. Bringing in power is going to be expensive.  It's atleast 200 feet in either direction and hard digging either way. 

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Then it was finally time for some fun work. For a bit of fire safety, I wanted metal on the lower part of my interior walls so I selected and cleaned and rustified some of the better corrugated metal and pulled some of the straightest old growth pine 2x6's. Also pulled some of the 4x6 pine posts to use as faux posts to help beak up the long straight wall.   

 

 

 

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While I had pulled all the nails out of the 2x6's as I loaded them up at the chicken houses, they still had thousands of big staples that held the insulation bands so they all got pulled as was cleaning and loading them out of the storage sheds.

 

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Sprayed first with muriatic acid and scrubbed and rinsed then hit random areas with a mixture of vinegar, hydrogen peroxide and salt to give a RUSTic look.

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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Next was installing the posts, running the 2x6 rail and baseboard and running the roofing felt then the framing for the wainscoting tin. 

 

 

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Installed a 1" steel bar between two 2x6 wall studs then attached a cable for use in attaching a winch for pulling inop vehicles in.

 

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Finally time for the rest of the roofing felt and corrugated tin

 

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Starting to come together and look like something now...

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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Evidence of powder post beetle had been seen in lots of the lumber I had salvaged both as I was salvaging it and also after it had been stored. Up until this point I had been spraying all of the salvaged framing lumber after installation with Timbor insecticide/fungicide. With the next phase of installing walls of stacked 2x6 old growth pine I wanted to insure treatment was applied to both sides of each board and in a sufficient amount to penetrate into the board. After much research I decided to go with a stronger albeit much more expensive Boron based treatment called Boracare. It was very labor intensive, involving first  diluting 1:1 with water and stirring with a drill paddle, laying the boards out and using a backpac sprayer, spraying one side then flipping the board and spraying the other then laying out sticks and another layer of boards and spraying and flipping again and repeat.

 

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Was great to be pulling all these boards out of the "temporary" storage sheds I had been storing them in for going on two years.

 

 

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As I finished spraying and after allowing time for the treatment to penetrate, I transferred them inside for further stacking, sticking and stacking. Here is part of the stack.

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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PS looks just like my 87 covered in a half inch of dust... like twins....

 

My 87 had been in storage since Sept. '19  until I got it last week (when the '30 went to the shop)

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and then, TRAGEDY struck. After all the research I had done on the Boracare product and  closely following the mix ratios and application rate I  was met with this after two weeks of drying. A white crystal powder had formed on the outside of all the boards.

 

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Untreated and treated

 

 

 

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I wiped a few of them down with a wet towel but it didn't come off. I then laid a few out and washed them down with a towel and Dawn soap. It removed most of it but after a few days about 20% of it was returning.

 

                                  Before                                                                                                                                           after drying a week

 

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It WAS NOT SUPPOSED TO DO THIS

 

 

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I started emailing the company I had purchased the 6 gallons of product from and they had not a clue why it was happening and gave me the email address to a representative at Nisus, maker of the product. After several emails with him with no reason or remedy, I was transferred to a senior engineer who tried to tell me that I had mixed the product too strong and the residue was a result of it not being able to be absorbed into what he referred to as a hard heart pine lumber. After several more emails detailing how I had followed the instructions to the T,  his recommended solution to the problem was to purge most of the product back out of of the lumber.

 

So began another series of moving the lumber outside, piece by piece, scrubbing the surface top and bottom, then  sticking and stacking and hosing down for two weeks, keeping it covered between hosing in order to keep it from drying.

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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Then it was back inside to dry, once again stacking and sticking and running fans 24/7 for two weeks to prevent mold.

 

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6 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Hooking up the electric in the boxes is the easy part.

 

my friends are sometimes shocked when they find out I'm not a very good electrician 😆

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WOW, its a good thing you're retired and have enough hours per day to do so much labor intensive work...have great respect the construction work you do.  BTW I'm OK at being a weekend electrician and carpenter, but I do hate plumbing!

Edited by dship (see edit history)
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58 minutes ago, dship said:

WOW, its a good thing you're retired and have enough hours per day to do so much labor intensive work...have great respect the construction work you do.  BTY I'm OK at being a weekend electrician and carpenter, but I do hate plumbing!

 

Hot on the left, cold on the right and you know what flows down hill, what's hard about that. But electrical... I can't even remember, is DC from a battery or is that AC.

Now carpentry, I love, period !

 

13 minutes ago, old-tank said:

I hope this is recent work, which means you are feeling better.

 

Thanks for that kind thought Willie. Actually though Willie, I think that the work of washing and moving all the lumber multiple times after the white crystal powder started appearing was somewhat what started my back problems. I was pissed and tense all the time I was doing it. Dealing with the Nisus company had been no joy, they would not admit it was a problem with their product or there guidelines for use but rather put the blame on me even after I showed clear evidence I had followed directions to the T. Funny though that the senior engineer I ended up befriending knew just what to do to remedy the problem, like maybe he'd seen it before a time or two. He did carry it up the chain but wasn't able to get them to even reimburse me the cost of the product, their only offer was more product which I laughed out loud at.  I mean after all the hours upon hours of pulling all those beautiful ol' old growth pine boards from the chicken houses, transporting, pulling nails and staples, cutting to lengths, moving from one pile to another, culling the beetle infested ones, washing them down, taking care to stick them properly for air drying to keep them from twisting, curling and cupping after wetting, and re-stacking, then seeing them covered with that *$#*_&^## white crystal powder, I was spent and exhausted, not only physically but mentally almost to the point of depression. I literally closed the doors to the barn for the last year and focused on my new grand daughter, camping and family. The CBD oil has worked wonderfully on my degenerated disc problem and I'm ready to go at it again. I have plans to start back up just as soon as I get the Century finished and back on the road though, hence my catching back up here now.  Enough whining!!  Thanks for listening....

 

 

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24 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

I don't question how beautiful that garage will be with those pine boards but how fire resistant are they?  Is it a good idea to use them in a working garage?

 

 I knew this would come up... "How fire resistant are they?" Much less than sheetrock and certainly less than metal I am sure, in fact it makes a pretty good fire starter for the fire pit.  Is it a good idea to use them in a working garage?  Is it a good idea for folks to live in the Santa Anna wind high fire risk areas? John I truly appreciate your concern and maybe you missed it but I did take risk of fire into consideration ie

On 1/19/2021 at 3:17 PM, MrEarl said:

For a bit of fire safety, I wanted metal on the lower part of my interior walls

 

My main work area will be on the opposite wall and will be mostly metal peg board and metal work cabinets. I've researched and  plan to test a couple of different "clear" fire proofing/flame retardant liquid sprays but they generally only last a few years. Thanks for your concern,  but I will be using the wood.

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35 minutes ago, Daves1940Buick56S said:

Earl:

 

Since the ceiling is open, how about a sprinkler system? That would answer the fire issue. Or did I miss that and you already put it in or are planning to?

 

Cheers, Dave

 

Thanks Dave and no you didn't miss it. Only a 3/4" water supply line. A full blown sprinkler system just not in the budget. There will be fire extinguishers mounted along all 4 walls.

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10 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Regarding fire resistance, boron is a fire retardant, have you thought about using it?

 

😬

 

ok, not funny but I just couldn’t help myself!

 

 

 

Boy, with friends like y'all 🙄.... but notice I did manage a HaHa.  Actually the Nisus engineer  made pretty much the same joke, wasn't funny then either.  And all the more reason I will be testing any fire proofing spray before applying it whole hog. BTW @JohnD1956 and @Daves1940Buick56S hope y'all didn't think I was being short with you, just that I'm a bit touchy on the subject.... 🙂

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On 1/19/2021 at 8:07 PM, 38Buick 80C said:

PS looks just like my 87 covered in a half inch of dust... like twins....

 

Is their an Oldest Dust judging category. If so, I bet my "Collecting dust since the late 1980's"  would do pretty well.

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