MrEarl

My BUICK SALES and SERVICE GARAGE

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and the little smoke house. I would love to just have the door off this!!!!! I tried to talk the owner into selling just the smoke house and some of the wall board and trim from the house but it was an all or nothing deal.

 

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Check out the nailing patter of this door. I have a thing for nailing patterns in my own work and appreciated this guys work from probably over a hundred years ago.

 

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and some early molded concrete block and brick

 

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Here is all that was required for the Electrical Inspection AND the Final Building inspection. The panel, one outlet and one light. I had installed the flat 2x6 wall for to mount the panel and to run the wiring up to the top plate on. 

 

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That must have been tough to have to walk away from boards and beams like that.  That old house looks to be a couple steps up from most old places around here.  I’d say that it was built during a prosperous time for someone.  When I see houses like that I wonder, in my melancholy sort of way, how many warm Christmas mornings were celebrated there.  So much of what you show is reusable and if you wanted a fresher look, just a pass or two through a planer would renew a rich and original look.  It would have fit for you but I understand and respect that voice of reason.

 

So what do you do with the original nail holes in the tin?  Probably almost no water would get in.  Also, does the weight of the wall tin sit on that rodent guard at the bottom or do you hold it off of that a bit?  I like the ideal of using it, it may close up things enough to keep the bugs or lizards out.  

 

I wish I had a place like the welding shop to do my sandblasting.  It’s another messy but necessary activity.

 

Elvis is requesting you post that song, “All I want for Christmas is my two nuts back”

 

enjoying your progress!

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Some more "as we go" design/build.  I like the simple little shed roof with wooden brackets design I had used on the old barn and decided to use it on the new. I call it the "brow".  Figuring this out in my head then watching it materialize was some of the most fun I had had since the start.

 

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So using some of the old yellow pine, build some brackets and mount to the walls to receive a 2x6 ledger to rest the lower end of the tin on.

Beveled the top and bottom ledgers to match the slope of the tin. 

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42 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

That must have been tough to have to walk away from boards and beams like that.  That old house looks to be a couple steps up from most old places around here.  I’d say that it was built during a prosperous time for someone.  When I see houses like that I wonder, in my melancholy sort of way, how many warm Christmas mornings were celebrated there.  So much of what you show is reusable and if you wanted a fresher look, just a pass or two through a planer would renew a rich and original look.  It would have fit for you but I understand and respect that voice of reason.

 

If the old house is still there when I finish the garage and a couple of Buick projects I may go back for some of the old house. I think I could have talked the folks out of some of it had I tried. I still have an unfinished basement a lot of that old milk paint pine would look great in.

 

47 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

So what do you do with the original nail holes in the tin?  Probably almost no water would get in.  Also, does the weight of the wall tin sit on that rodent guard at the bottom or do you hold it off of that a bit?  I like the ideal of using it, it may close up things enough to keep the bugs or lizards out.  

 

I turn the tin to the back side and caulk all the holes with silver caulking. It only leaves a very small tit sticking out the front, not really visible unless you know it's there. Yes the wall tin sits directly on the rat guard. There is a slight bevel to the guard allowing the water to run off. I also use epoxy under the bottom sill plate which helps keep scorpions and ants out to some degree. 

 

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18 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Thought I'd post up some pictures of an old home place that I considered deconstructing for the materials

 

The video combined with the photos of that old house was almost a tear jerker for me. Thanks for sharing.

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1 hour ago, Ronnie said:

 

The video combined with the photos of that old house was almost a tear jerker for me. Thanks for sharing.

 

as I said earlier Ronnie, "Music with poetry that stirs the soul is the one way to pass on to others feelings and emotions" .  When I visited that old house, it brought up memories of that song from CSN&Y's album American Dream, I thought of it while posting and thought I'd share.  Glad it stirred someones emotions. :)

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About your electrical insp. 8 yrs ago mine was similar. panel box and one outlet, no light and I was good to go.

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Some of the corrugated tin I wanted to use on the brow had a bit too much shine to it so decided to take the shine off so it would match up better with the rest of the tin instead of sticking out like a new pair of shoes. I went ahead and cut it all to length first then used muriatic acid and water to thin up the galvanized coating surface then a concoction of vinegar, peroxide and salt to start the rusting process.

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51 minutes ago, GARY F said:

About your electrical insp. 8 yrs ago mine was similar. panel box and one outlet, no light and I was good to go.

 

ain't it nice livin in the country. The inspectors last name was Brown so about all it amounted to was "Here ya go Mr Brown" and "Well thank you very much Mr. Brown" and off he went. :D

 

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Thought a piece of 5V tin would work and look good as a valley gutter so crimped the edges of the tin back to act as a water dam and installed it with the end running wild to be cut to proper length after the adjoining tin was installed.

 

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Time for some feelin.... some ol' time feelin.... from Guy Clark, a young Guy Clark

 

 

 

 

 

Pop a line and with a 4 1/2 " grinder cut the tin siding for the flashing to be inserted into. Both the top ridge board and the bottom ledger were cut to the angle of the roof slope so the metal would have plenty of area to rest on and be nailed.

 

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The make sure the first piece is perfectly square to the building and go.

 

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Had what I knew was some beautiful grained pined so decided to cut it to a bevel to show of it's beauty

 

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and use them here

 

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and it all comes together like this

 

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2 hours ago, MrEarl said:

I went ahead and cut it all to length first then used muriatic acid and water to thin up the galvanized coating surface then a concoction of vinegar, peroxide and salt to start the rusting process.

 

That concoction, as you say, should take care of a few weeds. ;)

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EXCELLENT WORK LAMAR!!!

 

I can’t wait to see how the front turns out as good as the rest looks!!!

 

Great job!

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Thanks Randall

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Fast forward to 1/17/18

 

Under heavy snowload, :D for Georgia that is 

 

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Also during the time I was building the "brow" the ground dried out enough and I was able to find some more good red clay fill and line up a hauler. I had originally laid down a couple inches of #57 stone on a pretty steep grade that I had concerns with it being too steep while also in a curve. I used plain stone instead of a graded aggregate base type material with fines in it as I did not want to cut off air and water to the old Post Oak tree roots. The bias ply tires of my '54's just dug in and spun. So I moved that stone and had 4 tandem loads of fill hauled in in order to lessen the grade. That puts me to like 65 loads total so far I think. Failed to get pictures of the loads as they were dumped into about 7-8 piles. Had a ball driving over the piles and leveling out with the ol Ford 2000, then grading it smooth. Pulled the stockpiled stone back down on it plus ordered another load of #6's for topping. Also took advantage of the loaded tandem to roll and compact the fill I had just installed. If I must say so myself, I've become a pretty good finish grade man with that ol Ford 2000 and 6 ft blade over the 30 years since starting the farm.

 

 

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I also had one load dumped in the front to bring that grade up a bit and level up to the top of the concrete pad. That makes it 66 loads.

 

 

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Somewhere around this time I had put tin on the walls and ceiling of the welding shed. This was some really nice used tin from a 5 year old barn that had blown down in a windstorm.  My buddy Clarence from Nashville came down and helped with this. Clarence let one of the pieces of tin end up a bit off. Always good to have helpers you can blame stuff on.

 

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The floor at the back wall is level. The wall along this side wall is sloping some as can be seen in the step of the tin at the bottom.

 

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Left a 6 inch wide "vent"  at the top of the sloped roof to draw smoke and welding fumes out. I burned an old feed sack in the back corner of the room and was pretty satisfied with the way it worked. May install a small exhaust fan later.

 

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Thanks Chris, lots to still report on just to bring it all up to where I am on it now.  Once that occurs I hope to update every day or so of my progress. Should help provide some inspiration and incentive to get moving on it again.

 

Alrighty then, with the inside of it done, time to get some doors on it. This was a fun little project.

And considering the subject is "Doors"  and to wake everybody up.  Spent some time back in '72 running up and down the west coast in my Volkswagen bus, around Santa Cruz and hung out for awhile in a beautiful little town named Boulder Creek. This song puts me back there.

 

Click it if you like, if not just pass it by

 

 

 

Buckle your seat belts boys (and you too  'berta if you're following)

 

As it is a welding shed and there will be sparks flying, as with the interior of the shed I tried to keep the amount of exposed wood to a minimum. The opening is about 8' x 10' making each door about 5' wide = heavy.

First thing after getting good measurements of the opening and adding a half inch to the width and figuring out how to handle the slope in the concrete pad was to lay it out. Used the old 3-4-5 triangle method to lay it out on the concrete slab inside the garage. Came out to within a tad over a 16th out on the diagonal and figured that was good enough for a pole barn. In other words, I can paint over that. 

 

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I am using the 1960's chicken house long leaf pine 2X6's that were the next thing to old growth heart pine. Dense and heavy. Picked out the clearest and straightest. Used the ol Makita to cut in half depth of each where it would be glued and screwed. Used Loctite PL 8X Fast Grab on both board before putting them together then screwed tight with no less than 6 2" exterior screws screwed in at an angle. Then attached some 1/4 " straps and corner braces with 1 1/2 x 1/4 lag bolts.

 

 

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Time to turn the album over. And this song actually has some ties to Buick. It caused quite a rift between Jim and the rest of the band when Jim discovered the band was considering taking $75,000 for a Buick ad. In that commercial, the car company would use the band's hit "Light My Fire," changing the lyrics from "Come on baby light my fire" to "Come on Buick light my fire."  He threatened to leave the band, the commercial never made.  thus probably changing Buick history forever.

 

It's Buick related, have a listen... :P

 

 

 

 

Considering the weight the completed door would be and that this is a one man operation, decided to hang the door frame then add the corrugated metal and insulation. Hung with two of the biggest galvanized steel hinges from Tractor Supply.

 

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Installed the corrugated tin on the front side then placed 3/4 inch foil faced Styrofoam behind that

 

 

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then fit in more tin on the back side and framed it out with wood strips

 

 

 

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Decided to let the old Made in the USA Strongbarn brand name be left exposed.
 

 

 

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Added some bolt latches. Drilled into the concrete to receive both while closed then another whole in the concrete for to hold one open and drove a piece of pipe into the ground to hold the other open

 

 

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Stapled up some rubber seal to slow the blowing wind down
 

 

 

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And done. And Elvis.

 

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and note the slope the concrete and the step in the doors to compensate for it. Wanted to be able to wash the room out with a hose when needed.

 

 

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From the inside.

 

 

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Note the hundreds of screws that will not only serve to adhere the metal to the wood frame but also let the tin act as bracing and make the whole thing more rigid. I went back a couple months later and torqued them all down again.

 

 

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And a couple of new galvanized handles aged with a bit of muriatic acid. and my OCD layout of screws

 

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It's amazing how perfectly spaced each screw is.  Especially the pattern on the front set of barn doors! 

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51 minutes ago, wndsofchng06 said:

It's amazing how perfectly spaced each screw is.  Especially the pattern on the front set of barn doors! 

 

Counting the corrugations and placing the screw  is pretty much all there is to it.  Anytime there are multiples involved in doing something, I count them, no matter if they need counting or not. I think it started back when I was 15 working a summer job loading hot freight cars with 50 lb bags of dog food.  Sometimes I even catch myself counting the times I turn a screw or nut onto a bolt.

I really thought I'd hear something from you about not making the back driveway conducive to pulling in and backing a trailer up to the back door of the garage. :P:D

 

54 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

The red door.  Gotta love it.   Nice work on the door you made!   

 

Rita actually chose the color of the back doors. Works for me. :D  Thanks for the compliment on the doors. They have been up now for over 2 years and no sag or warpage yet, and the bolts still hit good in the holes in the concrete well, so I believe they'll do.

 

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and something else I am doing at the top of all the door frames. Installing an eyebolt for lifting engines, rearends, lawn mowers or anything else up to about 600 lbs. The door frame top headers are double 2x10s with 2x10's or in this case where I will only be lifting lawn mowers and small engines etc, 2x6 and 2x4 nailed and glued to them. The eye bolts are 3/4 inch and are overkill rated at 5000 lb lift capacity so should also be able to take side strains if I need to winch a car up to the door.

 

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What the below picture  doesn't show well is that that is a  a 4x6 treated pine that was notched to fit over  and down into the headers to prevent sideways movement. Before buttoning it all up I had also screwed more screws through the header into the 4x6 also, thus tying it all together .  This will be used primarily for lighter weight lifting of lawnmowers etc. I feel comfortable it will handle anything up to 6-700 lbs which if anymore I would start worrying more about the structural integrity of the door frame itself. Maybe I'll put some "Load Limit" signs on it .

 

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