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Nice example of a 1930 Peerless for sale. Easily return to driver or add it to your collection.

Good body, good glass, engine turns over by hand. Engine has compression and spark. Rebuilt starter, rebuilt generator, appears to have new fuel tank. Original Stromberg UX-2 carburetor and Zenith universal carburetor with adapter. Complete new wiring harness still in box. Car is located in Fountain Hills AZ. Ask about delivery.

Asking $7500. Contact L.A. Marshall (602) 803-5757

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Edited by Peerless six-61A
price change (see edit history)
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An unusually complete car, down to the  pure silk window-shade pulls and woodgrained dash. That 5-digit patent number on the Car serial number plate, 14201, is interesting: low for a patent # because it´s from 1869.

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  • 5 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for asking. I looked at some previous posts of yours and saw that you know your way around antiques and have a 1929 Franklin. As you know, pre-WWII cars are all made of rare parts, except for the Fords. Maybe this is obvious & old news, but if you got that Peerless, this is what's out there....

 

  • Ebay. Looked today and saw a couple of distributors, some rotors & points that supposedly were shared by Peerless & other makes, some new hydraulic brake lines, a radiator & shell, and 3 aluminum Peerless hubcaps. Sometimes also original & r/p motometers, Peerless radiator emblems, instrument panels, V-8 engines, Radiators, timing chains, 4-barrel Ball & Ball Carburetors for Peerless V-8s, rad shells, a 1929 6-81 engine, a 1929 6-61 engine, and logo tire gauges. The best thing I ever saw there was the Car Serial number plate for the last Peerless built. 
  •  Parts. The 300+ Peerless owners have worldwide as extras. It may seem an impossible task to find out who they are....but I keep a register of all known Peerless cars & trucks worldwide (361). It took ten years of my life to do the research...but it's fascinating to find there are 8 in MO, 18 in NY, 4 in S. Africa, 2 or 3 dozen in Europe, etc. 
  •  A Peerless owner in Maine. Amassed world's largest collection of Peerless cars, about 12 counting parts cars + 2 or 3 school buses full of parts. The gentleman died in 2015, but his family has many parts for sale(See "AACA Peerless Forum", "Peerless For Sale Department" thread, Post #161). Family has sold 1 car but picked up 4 in the last 5 years.
  •  A Peerless owner in Ohio. He bought a collection w/ 4 truckloads of cars & parts in 2011, including spare engines, spare frames, & enough body panels to build a couple of sedans, eventually having 7 cars 1927-1930. Still has 4. A couple of years ago, he advertised he had a lot of parts for sale, including photos(see Peerless Forum under "Peerless Parts for Sale Thread", posts #98 & #102). Don't know how much is left, if any.
  •  Not a parts source, but there's a shop in the Tampa, FL area that's restored 7 Peerless cars recently(1926-1931 model years). They may be able to help you with your car or share repair knowledge. Pistorius Collectible Autos, www.oldwheel.com.

 

 Good news! The 1929 Peerless is by far the best-represented of all the surviving cars. Unlike the 1908s(1 left) and 1921s(1 left), there are about 60 of them, plus several 1930 6-61s like this one. The Six-61 Sedans cost $1,395 in 1929. Re: replica parts, it's limited. Lucas tires of course, spark plugs, some r/p motometers on ebay, a bronze Peerless Eagle radiator mascot sold in Irvine, CA. Also some cast stainless radiator mascots from MI, and some door handles of the same material.

 

I have followed this Peerless for 4 or 5 years, since it was in SW Missouri. Someone had it in a garage for decades. Don't know if that owner did any work on it , but it's a highly original car. Kind of unusual model. Technically doesn't exist. It's really a "continuation car" of a 1929 6-61, but sales were so good in 1929 they had to continue production into the 1930 model year for a few months after they got orders for 8,236 in one day at the New York Auto Show. In theory, all Peerlesses for the '30/'31/'32 model years were straight-8 cars. Triple cowl vents & "6-61A" designations on the I.D. plate separate it from the 1929 6-61. Same Continental engine and h.p.: 215 cu. in. and 62 h.p., I believe. 

 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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6 minutes ago, jeff_a said:

 Parts the ~250 other Peerless owners have worldwide as extras. It may seem an impossible task to find out who they are....but I keep a register of all known Peerless cars & trucks worldwide (360). It took ten years of my life to do the research.

Jeff,

Truely a labor of love, you are to be applauded for your efforts in compiling and maintaining this resource. ?

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Greed, too, Mal. I have a deal worked out with an old-time truck collector, whereby if I can find a Peerless truck anywhere in the world for him to buy, I will get a "square" of New Zealand beer sent to me. 24 bottles, no less!

 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Maybe 14,000 Peerless trucks were built, but the chances of me finding one in the States is in line with your chances of finding a polar bear in Alice Springs: not likely I'll ever profit from that square of beer. The things were stoutly built, and became one of the preferred supply carriers in World War one. Eventually a couple more will turn up beyond the 10 or so known(in UK, Ireland, S. Africa, NZ). Maybe India, Iraq, Russia or France. 

 

Seriously, thank you for the good words. It's fun looking up where they all are, or trying to. After I began studying the carmaker, I found that the first car in the town I live in was a Peerless, a 1904 4-cylinder Model 8. It was a $4,000 car and arrived here from Montana after a 7-hour drive over the Continental Divide. When you look at the one-cylinder motorettes Peerless started out with............it's amazing that they eventually sold $300,000,000-worth of cars.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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The contact name of Marshall is interesting. Is there any connection between this car and the Peerless that belonged to the Marshall family in Clarkson, New York? They also had a 1954 Buick Skylark at the same time. That was in the mid 1960's, but the name caught my eye.

Bernie

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Bernie, It doesn't look like L.A. Marshal has checked in lately. It's possible that L.A. or the Peerless have a NY connection, but I heard it was in Springfield, MO for decades. The last 2 owners have had it for just 2 or 3 years in AZ, but the Six-61A goes back to 1953 in Springfield. Not all bad, though, to be able to trace a car back that far. It looks like the car is quite complete, has been kept indoors, and isn't an orphan car in the sense of being the only one of its model to survive. Having the only Marmon V-12  would be great, but you can't call up other owners and ask for the firing order or a sales manual. Some may not know the engine has 7 main bearings; and a fuel pump, new for Peerless that year. The 6-61s all had horizontal hood louvers, like Blackhawk, Roosevelt, and Stutz models of the era. A light yellow 6-61 Roadster was restored by Mark Garvin of MA and shown at Hershey in 2012. 3 years later, it sold at the Owl's Head Museum auction in ME for $57,200, a big amount for Peerless' lowest price car, ever. I think the Roadsters went for $1,195. Don't get used to the idea that all 6-61s look like this. This one's in perfect condition, and there are only two left in the world(known 6-61 Roadsters) out of possibly 8,000 built(6-61s of all body styles). Most were like the green one below, sans the sidemounts and wire wheel options. However, it IS useful to see how far you can go restoring the lowest-priced Peerless model of 1929(I think Oldsmobile and Buick were comparable in price). Peerless also fielded the 6-81, 6-91, and 8-125 that year.

 

post-49853-14314301612_thumb.jpg dsc_0472_web__large.jpg

1929 6-61 Sedan $1,395+                     1929 Peerless 6-61 Roadster from the 2016 New England Auto Auction $1,195 new(D/S/M & wire wheels included)

(D/S/M & wire wheels extra

[those were a $225 option

on the 1928 6-91])

 

 

There are nearly 20 Peerlesses I know of in your state, including one in the Bergen area, which is way closer to you than Clarkson. I checked KPAIE today, and this Peerless roster shows 83 1929 Peerless cars + 11 that were continuation cars intended for '29, but built after the September 1st cut-off for the model year.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Jeff,

Thank you for the follow up. The Marshall Peerless in Clarkson shared a garage in a housing tract with a '54 Buick Skylark. That would have been around 1962-1965. The Peerless was just a nice, well preserved old car. At the time, the Skylark was being restored. Ten years was a long time for a New York car back in those days. My Cousins had a dynasty of paper routes in town at that time and I used to see the car riding on an afternoon route with one of them after school. I only worked Saturdays so I had the free time.

Interesting that one is in Bergen, NY, seems like I would know of it. I wonder if it is in an outdoor museum and just listed because parts of it still exist. Those old farmers will do that.

Bernie

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Can anyone address how difficult mechanical parts are to locate or purchase?

 

 

you will need to be a bit of a machinist or good at improvising.

 

parts are not readily available. Orphan cars are tough, but do offer a challenge some enjoy.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Interesting, the only reason to want the post deleted, he doesn't want anyone to know the asking price.  As in, when he goes to sell it again.....

 

I don't think such a request should be honored for a "guest", who'll probably never contribute to these forums.

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Just now, trimacar said:

Interesting, the only reason to want the post deleted, he doesn't want anyone to know the asking price.  As in, when he goes to sell it again.....

I don't think such a request should be honored for a "guest", who'll probably never contribute to these forums.

 

Agreed, Trimacar!  

 

Our forum archives are very helpful for research

and learning.  This thread has included a good

discussion of parts availability, and the continuation

of 6-cylinder cars when theoretically none were made.

I agree that someone might want to flip the car and conceal

the asking price, but profiteering isn't a good reason.

 

Please do not honor a guest's request to delete

a topic which quite a few AACA members have

contributed to.

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20 hours ago, MCHinson said:

I suspect your analysis is correct. I don't disagree with you but I do think that the original poster should at least let potential buyers know if the car has been sold. 

 

I agree, otherwise years from now he'll be getting calls!

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I too agree that the post thread should not be deleted! I also think it should be up to the seller, not an unregistered guest, to edit his original ad to reflect the car sold or to remove the price from the original post. Re-selling is not illegal, but deleting the old ad and hiding the selling price does have the aroma of future deceit.

 

If the original posting were a scam, such as using pictures skimmed from the internet to sell a car they did not own or some similar scenario, I would think that either full removal or a moderator making note of the situation and locking all further activity on the thread would be welcomed by all the users...

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Since my experience in the old car hobby began in 1959, I have found it highly predictable and usually quite entertaining to see and hear the shenanigans a purchaser, and many times the seller, go through to avoid revealing how much their car sold or was purchased for. It fun to watch how uncomfortable they get when you play at pinning them down. "And we agreed on a price", "I negotiated with the owner and we arrived at a fair price", but rarely a flat out dollar amount. I think it is based on the "what if they know what I paid" syndrome. Many people relate the way they think to how others think. If they knew someone paid, say, $7500 for a car and was asking $15000 they couldn't handle the thought. And if they found out after the purchase they would never sleep another full night in their life. Some would suffer from tremors, boils, shingles, or nervous system maladies. I am sure you know some of them or possibly shave one.

I paid $850 for my '60 Buick. That has no bearing on any selling price I would put on it. My Park Ave convertible was $500 to purchase. My Wife has a spreadsheet with some very low prices if I check out and leave her with the cars to sell. But while I am alive the prices are high regardless of what was originally paid.

 

That $7500 Peerless, without question the $7500 price was the entry fee. Nothing from here out is at a bargain price. All costs incurred after the purchase will be at full classic level.

 

Leave the price. How many times does a Forum member ask how much their car should sell for? They rarely, if ever, reply with the final selling price, do they.

Bernie

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2 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

That has no bearing on any selling price

That is absolutely true, any car is worth X amount at any point in time, depending on the agreement of the seller and buyer.  What the seller paid for the car means nothing in the grand scheme of things.

 

However, as mentioned, this forum becomes a reference resource as it moves forward day to day, and to delete good information on a particular car would be a shame.

 

I have a very good friend on this forum who I sold a few cars to over the years.  One in particular, I was on a tour and telling the story of how I acquired it and how much I paid for it, and he walked up right at the end of the story and heard.  My purchase price was precisely one-fifth of what he paid me for it, and what he paid me for it was a fair price.  He was taken aback, I'll say.

 

In the end, he toured the car all over the country, then sold it for over five times what he paid for it!  So, he had the last laugh for sure.....

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