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Locomobile 1909 Model L Restoration


alsfarms
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On 4/18/2020 at 2:00 PM, alsfarms said:

Picture 5  (this one shows the provision for the torque arm that controls the rear end torquing when under acceleration, to the left of the pinion))

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Looks like someone welded something in the torque tube hole.  Probably to prevent it from punching a hole in the casting penetrating into the differential cavity. 

 

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9 minutes ago, ak said:

Looks like someone welded something in the torque tube hole.  Probably to prevent it from punching a hole in the casting penetrating into the differential cavity. 

I put a brass freeze plug in the hole punched into the case by the torque tube in my case. 

 

20201227_125331.jpg

Edited by ak (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Hello John,  Thanks for sharing your pictures.  I certainly can see the weak link the torque arm being able to penetrate the rear end housing with the resulting mechanical issues.  I want to be very careful as I proceed to the same point with my rear axle.

Al

Edited by alsfarms
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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

I will post a few pictures of a couple of Jones 4" gauges that I now have for use on a Locmobile project.  These Jones instruments have created a dilemma for me.  I already have a very nice Warner Autometer, and matching Warner clock, that I had planed to use on this Locomobile Model L, (see images on page 7 of this forum).  I am impressed with the quality of these Jones units and am rethinking using the Jones units on the Model L.  What are your thoughts.

Picture 1 (Locomobile tachometer)

Al

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Picture 2 (Locomobile tachometer side view)

 

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Picture 3 (Jones 4" Speedometer)

 

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Picture 4 (4" Jones Speedometer Profile)

Now what to do!

 

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Edited by alsfarms
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I can see positives by using either set of gauges.  The Warner parts are great but do not have matching faces or profiles like these Jones instruments have.  However I do not have a matching Jones clock.  hmmmmm

Al

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To my knowledge, you do not have a car as of yet to mount these instruments on so I don't see a dilemma. People are constantly posting stuff for sale on a myriad of sights. By the time you get the car put together, you will have an opportunity to purchase any number of instruments. I prefer the look of the Jones but I also like Stewart Instruments.

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Thanks for the response.  I do like to consider each aspect of the restoration as a part of the car done.  That is how I feel about the instruments.  I also like the looks of the Jones well above the Stewart, But the high quality of the Warner Autometer is an aspect to recon with.  As you suggest, I do have some time to make my ultimate decision but I will not be required to spend big dollars right at the end of restoration as I do have that purchase out of the way now.  Just one more step out of the way.  I am hoping that now that I am 1 month through the covid-19 issue that I will start to feel like I can do something, in a constructive way.

Al 

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Al, did Locomobile not give preferential treatment to one brand of instrument company? While many lesser makes did not provide instruments  with the purchase, they did give preferential treatment. Early Buicks used Corcoran  primarily for their lights but owners could purchase anything they wanted. Since you have instruments with the Locomobile logo, why not go with that brand? You can pick up needed parts along the way, you have time. My point is though, there is probably one brand of instrument that is considered correct for Locomobiles. Anything else will be considered incorrect.

 

I agree, its good to restore each component and set it aside till assembly time, but at this point, you are still a little ways away from assembly.

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Yes, that is my thinking.  Do what I can with resources and time that I can make available now.  Body built, new hood, front fenders, wheels, many castings, engine 100% done and running and etc. including a myriad of small parts.  On preferential treatment to some items like lamps and instruments.  Depending on the year, a trend does seem evident, even in factory release photographs. Earlier Locomobiles generally used Rushmore headlamps and carbide generator.  Side lights generally could be Gray and Davis, (non-script) or Solar (script).  I see a higher number of Warner Autometer (speedo's) than any other make used in Locomobiles, but that is not a 100% thing.  I have the Rushmore headlamps/carbide square generator and a full set of Locomobile script Solar side and tail lamp for the 1909 and am happy with those pieces.  Those lamps mirror the original factory photograph of the same model and year Locomobile as my automobile.  I am still in a quandary on which instruments to use on this Locomobile!

Al

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With respect to lamps and instruments, Locomobile gave the choices to the customer.  There could be standard lamps which were Solar, or Rushmore at additional cost, or Solar Eclipse also at additional cost.    There was even a credit for providing a car without lamps.   With repect to instruments, same story.  However, in 1912, Locomobile was discounting a combinationn of Jones instruments provided together with Kimball windshields.   See attached.  Yes, there was choice of windshields, choice of plating as brass, nickel, or gun metal, or brass and black.  and of course choice of color.

 

 

scan0007.jpg

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Hello Bob,  That is an excellent bit of factory information you have shared here, thanks!  I have a few questions for you.  Do you happen to have a picture of what the Kimball windshield assembly would look like for a 1912 Locomobile?  I have never seen any Hoffecker instruments, have you?  It would be nice to see a picture of a Hoffecker.  I am not sure of the exact Jones Speedometer model number for the Jones 4" Speedometer shown in pictures above.  Can anyone here identify the model number I have?  I would like to see a similar factory document that was issued for 1909-1910 Locomobile if anyone has such a thing.  A typical Solar headlamp is a quality piece and I am surprised at the upscale difference the Solar Eclipse as compared to the typical Solar lamp.  Thanks for sharing this information.

Al

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Hello Layden,

Thanks for the pictures of the Hoffecker instruments.  Do you know what the small needle is for on the Speedometer?  Are these two instruments something that you have thoughts of selling?  Do you know the mechanical status of these?  I wonder what vintage these Hoffecker gauges are?  Being silver faced, I would assume that they should be 1912 or earlier?

Al

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Does anyone here have any factory sales literature of early Brass Jones instruments?  I would like to have someone post a picture of the following Jones Speedometer Models: 15, 16 215, 216, 315 and 316.  I am curious what the evolution from one model to next is.

Thanks,

Al

Edited by alsfarms
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  • 1 month later...
Posted (edited)

Here are a few pictures of a recast Locomobile Model L muffler and parts.  This unit will be used on my 1909 project.  The muffler may be correct for other years and models of Locomobile also.  Can someone show me an early Model M (48) Locomobile muffler for comparison?

Al

IMG_20210611_181101686.jpg

Edited by alsfarms
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  • 1 month later...

Here is the latest adventure on the restoration  of the Model L.  I decided to tune up the steering column with a restored steering wheel, new brass tube and whatever else is needed before fitment in my chassis and body.  I also will be loaning out the quadrant pieces for duplication to help along the restoration of another Model L.  Here are a few pictures of my assembly.  I have it soaking in penetrating oil for a couple of weeks before I attempt to drive out the retaining pins and screws to get the quadrant assembly off before the steering wheel goes out for repair.IMG_20210710_072334120.jpg.127a8976f195110e1c3f50b363aa882c.jpg

Al

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It's good to see the new limo is not taking precedence over the model L. It is genuinely exciting to see that steering column on the work bench. The quadrant itself may be relatively easy to get off its tube. I have found that steel bolts don't seize in brass fittings. I hope you have my luck. Of course, the quadrant and arms are attached to three tubes that go down through the middle of the shaft. Whatever is on the other end should be removed first and then the three tubes drawn up through the shaft. The quadrant simply unbolts with a compression fitting; the two arms look to be pinned. The lower arm may reveal its pin easily but the upper arm may be blind pinned from the bottom and it may not be possible to get the pin out. You could dip the arm in some rubber mold material to make a mold and then a wax casting to use to cast a duplicate arm. I would be hesitant to try and drive pins out. Of course, you already know this.

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Like all aspects of antique automobile restoration.....it is critical to not damage things during disassembly.  I am going to try to remove the spark, throttle and quadrant arms from the stationary tube but also the movable tubes.  Once again..... carefully!

Al

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Out here in the west, it has been hot and dry!  Not comfortable at all.  I have been soaking the screws, pins and moving parts on the top of the Locomobile steering gear quadrant.  Today, after a couple of weeks soaking, I wheeled the heat wrench (torch) to a convenient place and applied some gentle heat a couple of times.  Next came the best and correct sized flat blade screw driver I could IMG_20210728_160045143.jpg.4f9e5838a02c073764215bb9d363e624.jpgfindIMG_20210728_160034540_HDR.jpg.f75b96a432c9bd8ba1605e4c31814556.jpg.  The slots on the screw are really deteriorated by rust. I wanted very little fight.  Well with just a bit a wiggling and gentle persuasion, out came the screws and off came the serrated control bar for the spark and throttle levers.  It is certainly nice to get these screws out the easy way.  Here are a few pictures.

Al

 

 

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Last for today, I lightly applied some heat to the attaching pins on the spark and throttle levers.  A bit of heat for a couple of days and those pins should tap right out.  More on that in a couple of days.  I am hoping to have the steering wheel off and ready to send out for a new rim to be installed soon.  ( And other pieces ready to go to the foundry for duplication ).

Al

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