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Locomobile 1909 Model L Restoration


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  • 2 weeks later...

Up-date on the 1909-1910 Handbook problem.  I have run across a source for copied pages out of a 1915 and earlier Handbook.  Sadly, that handbook is not laid out the same as my older handbook.  If anyone here has any original literature 1915 and older drop a note.

Al

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello Mike,

Here you will see pictures of the two different Brass Valve Cage covers.  The six flat covers are 1-3/4" across flats.  The 8 flat covers are 2-1/2" across flats.  I do not need a slugging or striking wrench, but something that fits nice to the hex or octagonal shape and that I can with some heat, soaking and gentle persuasion remove the caps without damage.  Let me know what extra tool you may have.

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Hello Al,

 

These 8 sides spanners are available on eBay part number AHH5839 they are 70mm across flats. They are only about £10. Could you modify one to fit your covers?

889093075_mgspanner.thumb.jpg.ec281ccc6ddbabcd0020a92df779fcff.jpg

 

I'll have a look in my sheds later on, and see if I have anything that maybe of use to you.

 

Mike

Edited by Mike Macartney
forgot to add photo (see edit history)
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Hello Mike,

Thanks for looking in your stash!  Too bad that nothing is quite right.  I have thought of getting a shop with a CNC plasma torch to cut me a tool, as you have suggested.  I just want/need the tool to fit like a finger in a glove to minimize the opportunity for damage during the removal and install process. NO PIPE WRENCH OR COLD CHISEL!

Al

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Al, I collect automotive hubcap wrenches and came across some possibilities. The one on the left is embossed with CMC Co. and has the 2.5" octagon opening. The wrench on the right is a Timken axle wrench from the 1920's that came in quite a few variations. The variation shown is marked #55449 and came with 1924-29 Cadillacs. The large opening is 2.5 " octagon and the small opening is 1 11/16" hex. With a little machining, you could achieve the desired 1 3/4" opening and have both sizes covered with a single tool. These wrenches are common and there is a Lincoln variation as well. If you search on e-bay "Vintage Timken hub cap wrench" you will find the Timken issued variation. Be sure to verify that the opening size is correct before you order as each variation my differ.

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Hello Paul,

As you are a collector or these vintage hubcap wrenches, DO you think they are heavy duty enough to be up to the task of taking some impact to get the Valve cage caps off an engine block.  As mentioned, plenty of soak-um, easy on the heat then cautious impact on the wrench and the cap should come off.

Al

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Hello Al,

 

You have unwittingly helped me!

 

When you asked about 6-sided and 8-sided spanner for your Locomobile, I 'dug out' the spanners I had, to measure for you. I left the spanners on the bench in my bottom shed. Now I have started taking the Humberette engine apart I need a 6-sided spanner for the valve covers on my engine. By luck, one of the spanners I got out to measure for you, is just the size I need for my engine. It's a good job it was not the size you needed, as I would have posted it to you, had it been the right size for your engine!

 

Mike

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That is a win-win!  I am anxious to see how you are going to proceed with the mechanics of your Humberette.  Glad you have a proper spanner to remove your valve caps with.  I am going to get two wrenched cut with a CNC plasma cutter tomorrow.  I will then fine tune fit the wrench to the valve cap and devise a way to secure the custom wrench to the cap so everything with stay in place while I use some gentle persuasion to remove the cap.

Al

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Mike, 

I should be picking up my custom CNC Plasma cut wrenches today for use to remove the valve cage caps.  I had them cut just a bit snug so I can finish fit them for the best possible fit between the caps and the wrench.  I have been away for a good week and have not been reading or posting on teh chat auto chats, I will get back to business now!

Al

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I did get two new tools built for removing the "T" head valve cage caps.  I had them CNC plasma cut out of 3/8" flat stock, (I will still need to finish fit these tools with a file to get the best possible fit to the cap).  I left 1" of wall around the cap opening to allow me to custom fit if needed in order to remove the caps.  I plan to modify an old broken spark plug by welding a stud into it that will allow me to connect the tool to the cap and hold it in place while I apply some heat and give a few well placed love taps with a whammer.

Al

Picture 1

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I am thinking ahead.  I have a couple of caps missing that will need to be recast before assembly.  Having the cap out of the way, I have measured the size of the copper crush gasket that is needed to create a seal between the valve cap and the jug.  The OD of the copper crush gasket is 2-3/4" and the ID is 2-1/4".  Any good ideas on making my own gaskets or a good source for outright purchase?  A picture will follow.

Al

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I've seen the crush gaskets offered by someone selling parts for "one lunger" engines. I don't know if I still have the link but I'll look for it.

 

j

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Here's one place...

 

damn.... for some reason this computer will not copy.

Try a search on the Genuine Aircraft Hardware Co. They have solid copper crush gaskets as used in aircraft engines. I'll keep looking for the copper/asbestos (or whatever they are using now) type.

 

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Got it... do a search on Starbolt Engine Supplies.

If you have a problem finding it I'll try to find it and sent from my work computer. I've no idea what is wrong with this one but it isn't worth paying someone to fix and I pretty much hate electronics.

 

jp

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This is just an observation on my part but I think that doing brass car work, as we are, has a lot more in common with antique machine tools and engines than it does with conventional "car" work. Long before I could afford to buy the Mitchell (which was only possible because I inherited some money fro my late father) I started on my machi8nes - actually the lathe that is in so many of my photos. It stood outside for 15 years and was literally rusted into a solid lump. Only someone with no other choice would have undertaken it but I had the time and I couldn't afford a better machine so I started on it - not having any idea if I'd ever finish. I learned a lot from that. I then did a small Brown & Sharp horizontal miller and my hack saw (which was also outside with the lathe). If it's possible to resurrect machines like that, cars, (which are generally nowhere near as precise) may be a challenge but are never impossible.

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Hello Terry, 

During the Locomobile engine rebuild, I also ordered copper crush gaskets from Restoration Supply.  That business is great and very helpful.  We are lucky to have that business supporting our antique automobiles and this hobby.  They just didin't have the best sized crush gasket available so I thought I would try to locate a better fitting gasket before I start to run the car on the road.  I also have a spare engine that I would like to have a set of good fitting gaskets on.  What is the latest on your Wisconsin engine and casting projects?  You are probably enjoying the summer break.

Regards,

Alan

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  • 1 month later...

I have plenty of smaller side projects to complete  the rebuilding of the Locomobile Model L, that is the subject of this thread.  I was lucky enough to have access to an original Locomobile Model L during the restoration process.  This car had many pieces that I needed to duplicate to facilitate restoring my Locomobile.  Among the many pieces that I was able to use as pattern for duplication is the wooden hood sashes, one on each side of the frame.  These pieces run under the hood and through them the hood latches are mounted.  These wooden pieces should be stained and finished with a suitable material.  In another thread, where I was speaking about refinishing a red oak two cylinder coil box, the suggestion was made to use a de-whiskering method before any stain or final finish is applied.  I will post two pictures of these wooded sash pieces.  Share any observations.  I am thinking that I will go with a very similar process that I use on the coil box and that method is to use Spar Varnish.

Al

Picture 1

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  • 4 weeks later...

This has been a very busy summer, likely for most of us.  I thought I would post a few pictures of one of the new rewooded rear wheels for this Locomobile.  I also had new cast iron brake drums poured and they turned out nice.  I am going to be very cautious as I fit the new brake drums to the wheel spokes so that I maintain a very good degree of concentricity.  Here are a few pictures.

Al

Picture 1:  rear view of new rear wheel

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Edited by alsfarms
addition for clarity (see edit history)
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