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Locomobile 1909 Model L Restoration


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Here is a picture of one of my new machined 4140 shackle bolts , along with the yellow brass grease cap.  I am not quite finished with the cap.  It will be configured like the typical "pinch top" design.

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This shows the machined and threaded end of the shackle bolt that will thread on the grease cap and have provision for a typical modern grease fitting.  I did this to assure that I get things greased and keep it clean!  I need to clean and heat treat all the 4140 parts to toughen them up before I put them into service.

 

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Edited by alsfarms (see edit history)
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Here is one of many of the chassis and suspension grease fittings that I have machined.  These will have the same "pinch top" design brass grease caps.  I made these caps to be able to bottom out on the threads before hitting the head of the grease zerk.  That way they will not rattle off while I am driving down the road.

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Here is a picture of one of the main leaf end eyes.  I am very happy with the rest of the spring stack as they have nice tapers and rounded as the originals.  However, I am not that pleased with the "out of round" bushing.  I had thought of having yet another main leaf built for each of the four corners.  After more study, I think I will push out these bushings, then ream the hole over-sided (without impairing the strength of the spring) then machining some new custom deluxe homemade "round" steel bushings to push in and fit properly my new shackle pins.

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Al,

 

It is easy to criticize after the event, but I would have thought that the spring maker would have been better using a solid bar, or hollow bar, rather than tube, in the middle of the spring shackle and then drilled it to fit the spring bushes.

 

Mike

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Hello Mike,  You hit the nail right on the head, regarding this problem!  I am so happy with the rest of the new made spring stacks that I am just swallowing hard on the problem with the eyes.  The issue does bug me to the point that I will remove the existing bushing, ream oversize and build a custom bushing to push back in.  I will probably have a pilot hole only to start with, so I don't distort the bushing when pushing it in place.  Then I will finish the ID of the hole to match my new machined shackle bolts after the new bushing is in place.

Al

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This picture is of the other side of the car and shows the original main leaf spring that was installed at the Locomobile factory in 1909.  The end is forged and not rolled like most typical springs.  I need to drill and install the spring alignment clips when I do the actual assembly.

Al

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Al...I thought of you and your Loco last night as I drove through Bridgeport. I am told that the Locomobile factory is still standing but I've never had the time to stop and investigate...it's about a 3 or 4-hour drive from me (depending on traffic which can be terrible) so I only go that way on the rare occasions I have to go towards New York City.

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Good Morning Joe,

I have been right past the Bridgeport works a few years back.  You are certainly in a beautiful area.  Bridgeport has rather ran its course and appears rather "weathered" in modern times, (to bad).  If I could turn the clock back, it would be nice to visit the Bridgeport factory, Buffalo factory and Trenton factory of a few of the makes that I certainly admire during the Hay Day of early automobile development.  My current project is getting close to surviving into the next generation.

Enjoy the traffic, I don't!

Al

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My impression of Bridgeport is that it's a very tough, run-down industrial city long past its prime. It's actually a mirror image of the place where my shop is...Woonsocket, RI. I hate the traffic but it occurred to me that even though I've been in some terrible traffic jams in the UK nothing compares to negotiating the run through New York over the George Washington Bridge in the dark.

 

j

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Hello Joe,

I am glad that I do not have to deal with your east coast traffic!  We have one traffic stop light in our whole county.  Total population is around 8,000.  My wife and I would like to make another Autumn leaf trip this year or next.  But we would try to stay out of the congested areas!  WHen are you going to do the run test on your pump with no springs?  I am curious of your test results.  

Al

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I may be running it tomorrow. I just finished putting a new bushing in the cap which was the last thing I needed to do before reassembling it but you never can tell what will come up.

Stick to northern New England - where the best foliage is in any case. Upstate NY is beautiful as is Vermont and New Hampshire and if you wander as far south as Rhode Island you're always welcome to stop by.

 

j

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Here is a picture of another Locomobile script air gauge.  This one has the silver background and exactly matches the Autometer Speedometer.  This one will look more proper and is the unit that I will use in my fuel delivery system.  I will not be using the white faced gauge shown above.

Al

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Here is a top view of the Carbide Generator.  Note the stamped in number; B 3041.  I am not an expert on Rushmore hardware or the numbers.   Does anyone have a numbers list for these Rushmore Generators?

Al

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Here is a couple of pictures of the release handle for a brake actuating lever, I lacked one and decided to make this one on the milling machine.  It is not smoothed out and finished but will work out very nicely.

Al

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Here is a picture of a before and after (I machined a new replacement out of SS) of the brake lock out piece.  This piece is lifted when you squeeze the handle as show above, and allows for pressure put on the hand brake.  Then to hold that position, let off on the handle.  This was a fun piece to build.

Al

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Mike, 

You ask a fair question!  I started this Locomobile project when I was a young man and a newly wed.  I have had over 40 years of labor of love with my wife but also with the Locomobile.  The "before" pictures I have are all taken way before the ease of digital pictures.  I will dig around in my old negative film pictures and see what I can scrounge up to post a picture here of what I started with.

Al

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Al,

I now understand why you have not shown any photos. Forty years on the restoration is certainly a labour of love. Back then it was expensive taking photos and having them printed. Presumably, back forty years ago, judging by the rust on the lever, the Locomobile was lucky to find someone to save her from being scrapped? Keep up the good work. Here's hoping it won't take another 40--years to finish the restoration! :)

Mike

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I would love to see some before pictures as well and maybe a bit of the story. Am I correct in assuming this is your grandfather's car and did it come from your great grandfather's dealership? Has it been in your family all this time or was it sold off only to be repurchased by you? I suspect you have an awesome car with an even more awesome story to go with it. Can you bring yourself to share it with us?

 

 

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Hello Mike and Al,

I do need to settle down and structure the history of my Locomobile.  As the fifth generation is now in full swing since my car left Bridgeport, lots of history has taken place, both nationally and in my family.  In the foreseeable future, I will put the story together.  My car spent until the late 1940's   parked no more than 200 feet from my back door.  Lots of story in between.  I will post more later.  The car was originally owned by my Great-Grand-Dad who died in 1932, (way before I was born, even my Grand-Dad was an old man when I was a kid).

Al

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Here is a little bit of a problem.  I have purchased a 1909 Locomobile  Instruction Manual.  This is the early equivalent of our modern Owners Manuals.  Upon further inspection I noticed something; take a look and see if you can figure out what problem I have.

Al

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I say it is number 26: Don't let the car set idle in cold weather for any length of time. Forty years certainly qualifies but this is the owner's manual talking. No judgment from me!

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