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Brake shoe riveter I restored last fall.  Done two jobs with it so far.  It was built by the Chicago rivet and machince co.    It has a drum sander and an adjustable coutersink bit.  I bought it locally for 100 bucks.  Already paid for itself and I don't have to ship these out anymore.  

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On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2017 at 2:04 AM, Bill Stoneberg said:

I found this at a garage sale this weekend for $ 3.  I already have a similar one but this is the Super Automotive Analyzer.  

 

I couldn't pass it up.

 

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I think I have one of those. Now I have to look for it! Darn, another distraction..........

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Here is a picture of Dad's Snap-on Locking Wall Cabinet.

I don't have the heart to move it off the wall yet since Mom is still there. Will have to soon enough once she is ready to sell.

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Besides it's full of stuff. I even found a new set of points and condenser in there for my 1920 Overland Model 4.

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On 12/16/2017 at 11:38 PM, MrEarl said:

Love this old lighted Blackhawk 4 ton for moving cars around in the shop

 

 

 

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We call them alligators and they come in several sizes larger too, as well as all mechanical and hydraulic - great for jacking up 1930's cars without removing the luggage from the luggage rack

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There was some discussion on the Buick PreWar section about what chemicals to use to clean parts. I advised that I use a wire wheel on a pedestal grinder for this task. Attached is a photo of my pedestal grinder.I have no idea of it's age, but you can't get a belt for it at the hardware store any more.Sharp eyed guys will notice the drill press behind it so I included a photo of it too.It's just a conversation piece,being way too slow for me.

 

Jim

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Dug into a few tubs and found this Sears Analyser and Timing light.

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The fellow I received it from have a '63 Pontiac and used them to tune it when replacing the points. The unit uses a 9 volt battery which I took out before putting away in the tub.

 

it's been awhile since replacing points but just might read up and give it a try when I need to.

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8” Wilton vice mounted on repurposed family owned metal. The stalk is one of Dad’s oxygen bottles and the base is a worn out road tractor wheel from my first cousin.

Turbinator

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These are from my father's garage tool box. After working on the engine lower end and cleaning the pan gasket surface, you thread these into the block and snap the pan with new gasket up in place. No struggling to hold the pan up there while all those bolts are started! 

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Layden, those are neat! I recently replaced the pan gasket on my 65 Ford Mustang and was delighted to discover that the gasket came with a set of plastic guide tools very similar to those you have. They really helped with the installation. I never knew that it was an old idea and that there were genuine tools made for that purpose.

Edited by Wheelnut (see edit history)
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Papa is gone now but these were according to him from the 1940s and was an old idea then. I have used them on Model T Fords and other era cars especially large cast aluminum pans. I would think that in the days of cleaning sludge out of the oil pan and doing a bearing tightening before 50K miles that these were probably in most really serious garage mechanic's toolbox. Thrown out with the demise of a ring and valve job.

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On 1/17/2021 at 11:15 AM, Wheelnut said:

1940s Sun Motor Tester. Haven't used this yet but I did power up the various modules and all seems to be working. Made in the late '40s.

 

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I always wanted one of these. I had the opportunity to use one at school.

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On 12/7/2017 at 9:50 PM, Bleach said:

 

I'm thinking more like early 80's. I'm sure I was still stabbing oil cans with those metal spouts that would often leak where the seal met the top of the can. I also hated those cardboard can that would sometimes collapse when you stabbed them.

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Yep, I remember the switch when I was in junior / high school in the mid 80's.  I still have a can of Prestone in a can like that.  

 

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On 2/24/2021 at 8:08 PM, Layden B said:

These are from my father's garage tool box. After working on the engine lower end and cleaning the pan gasket surface, you thread these into the block and snap the pan with new gasket up in place. No struggling to hold the pan up there while all those bolts are started! 

t pan holders.JPG

 

Great tool! I will order two sets this weekend. Felpro make 5/16" and 8 mm, in plastic.

 

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