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I don't know how old it is, but my grandfather have it to me when I started. He said its one of the most important tools in the box. It's even helped me through my first semester at the University. 

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13 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Great subject for a thread here Mud, thanks for starting it. Cool drill, especially like the gear shift feature. So why did you take it apart? 

 

You know me, because I could!  (The grease was pretty hard and it did not shift very easy)

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6 hours ago, J.H.Boland said:

5a25a7fd2bdfe_StrombergMotoscope2.JPG.0e478dd99d4ac37914e52d53938d093c.JPGI picked up this Stromberg Motoscope a few years ago.It has numerous diagnostic features and made a great service selling tool for the state of the art shop ca.1932.

Stromberg Motoscope & base.JPG

 

 

Very nice. I always wanted one of the those vintage Sun machines, but I would need a larger garage!

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This socket set was given to me about 50 years ago by an old mechanic that had worked at a Ford garage in northern Ontario in the 1920's.He was right when he said I could use it when working on my '21 Chevy.Some of the sockets are in 32nds of an inch,ideal for those larger headed bolts and nuts on the older cars.Made by the Bethlehem Spark Plug Company of Pennsylvania.

Vintage socket set 001.JPG

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On 12/6/2017 at 11:55 AM, Barney Eaton said:

Remember these?   Does anyone know when they went from the round cans to plastic?  I'm thinking early '70's

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I'm thinking more like early 80's. I'm sure I was still stabbing oil cans with those metal spouts that would often leak where the seal met the top of the can. I also hated those cardboard can that would sometimes collapse when you stabbed them.

Image result for oil can spout

 

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Just did a quick search on oil cans and the changes from metal can to cardboard and plastic was not an overnight event.

The vague answer is round plastic started in the '60's,  and cardboard continued into the late '80's

I don't remember round plastic I guess not all oil companies went to plastic.

Did not find anything that gave a date for the start of todays style rectangular plastic quarts.

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On ‎12‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 6:30 AM, Janousek said:

Pair of 1960's Quincy's with a 51' John Deere "G" for motivation.  Work in progess as the air dryer is now incorporated onto the tank.  

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What do you think the CFM would be?

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It's variable based on tractor RPM's but the pump specs max them around 100cfm's at 175psi.  I run about half throttle and do most of my blasting around 30psi so I always have plenty of air.  Even if I bump the pressure up to 100psi for a frame I have plenty.  I built this because I didn't want to purchase another piece of equipment with an engine when I have a tractor just sitting there.  That and my 5hp+7.5hp compressors running tandem couldn't quite efficiently keep up with a 1/4+size nozzle while blasting.  

 

I originally ran the pto direct drive but the tractor had to run 540rpm pto speed and seemed to scream the old 2 cylinder tractor.    I then geared it up with a maximum of 900 pump rpm's and run about half throttle putting the pumps around 600rpm's.  

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I got this from my dad. Whether he actually used at the dealership, I don't know.  Manual valve lapper.  Continuously turning the handle in a clockwise direction caused the lapper to go about 3/4 of a turn clockwise then go about a 1/4 turn counter clockwise. It would continue this motion as long as you turned the handle.20171212_135949.thumb.jpg.dbe4dd069bb4e27a2ebeee9921df07ef.jpg

 

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Could probably use a new suction cup.

 

I also have an old hand operated valve spring compressor but it's buried somewhere.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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On 12/7/2017 at 7:50 PM, Bleach said:

 

I'm thinking more like early 80's. I'm sure I was still stabbing oil cans with those metal spouts that would often leak where the seal met the top of the can. I also hated those cardboard can that would sometimes collapse when you stabbed them.

Image result for oil can spout

 

 

All of my cars still have one of those spouts in the tool kit. :D

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On 12/5/2017 at 4:48 PM, Larry Schramm said:

 

On 12/5/2017 at 1:50 PM, wndsofchng06 said:

I love my vintage air compressor...

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I have one of those too in my shop.  Have no idea how old it is.

 

All that I know is that it has a big 460 volt 3 phase General Electric motor that runs it.

 

Not to be a downer, but you guys ought to have those tanks checked if they're that old.  I was once standing 5' away from a compressor when the tank exploded.  Not an experience I care to repeat.

Edited by KongaMan (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, KongaMan said:

 

Not to be a downer, but you guys ought to have those tanks checked if they're that old.  I was once standing 5' away from a compressor when the tank exploded.  Not an experience I care to repeat.

I too have seen that video, terrifying is right.  Good reminder!

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An old Mac tool box I restored a few years back. In incorrect Buick Engine Green color obviously.

 

 

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On 12/3/2017 at 5:22 PM, Mudbone said:

I picked up this Vintage ½ Wen Drill at a garage sale. Never saw one like this before.

 

 

Thanks for dragging up an old memory.  We were building a "strip down" from an old 37 Ford pickup.  We needed a couple of big holes drilled into the frame and I let Ray use my dad's 1/2" drill with the screw-in handle like the Wen shown.  He was sitting cross legged on the ground with the drill in both hands and the switch locked in the on position.  He finally worked his way almost through when the drill caught on that burr that's sometimes left.  The drilled turned Ray over, he turned  loose and the drill kept going.  It continued to spin until it wrapped the cord around itself and pulled the cord from the outlet.  Still brings a smile to my face.  Thanks. 

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, MrEarl said:

 

 

 

An old Mac tool box I restored a few years back. In incorrect Buick Engine Green color obviously.

 

 

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That’s spectacular!  No small job either.  

 

I tell people that my motto is, “Anything worth doing is worth overdoing!”  Looks like this would fit you pretty well too.  

 

Very Nice!

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My old Buicks demand a lot of woodwork. So, I think this qualifies for this thread.  It’s a 6” jointer and is close to 60 years old.  For that matter, most all of my large power tools are about that same vintage.  This “old iron” is hard to beat.

 

Joel

 

 

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Thanks Joel, Not to mention it was cold as a witches you know what, you can see some snow still on the ground in one picture. It was hard keeping the little paint room up to temperature too, without blowing fuses. I forget exactly how many hours I put into it but I expect it was around 30-40. It was just something I wanted to do. The color in the pictures is off a bit as I used CARS Buick Green and it looks better in person. Thanks so much for the compliment. :)

 

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22 hours ago, MrEarl said:

 

Thanks Joel, Not to mention it was cold as a witches you know what, you can see some snow still on the ground in one picture. It was hard keeping the little paint room up to temperature too, without blowing fuses. I forget exactly how many hours I put into it but I expect it was around 30-40. It was just something I wanted to do. The color in the pictures is off a bit as I used CARS Buick Green and it looks better in person. Thanks so much for the compliment. :)

 

 

Just what I needed is more distractions! I love it. The color is perfect. But I will have to put this one on the bottom of the list.

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Bought this Evans king pin reamer set on EBay several years ago.  It has served me and my old Buick’s very well.   There is something missing from this box but I don’t know what it would be unless it’s a wrench to turn these reamers.

 

 

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1 hour ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Bought this Evans king pin reamer set on EBay several years ago.  It has served me and my old Buick’s very well.   There is something missing from this box but I don’t know what it would be unless it’s a wrench to turn these reamers.

 

 

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I would guess that it would be like a tap handle, the bar type.

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