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1979 Buick Estate Wagon Limited - Southern Belle


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15 hours ago, old-tank said:

That is about as good as it gets. 

 

Find a '69 or'70 Olds 455 engine.  It's a lot less work, and should be a bolt in. By the time you finish modifying what you have, it will likely be the same , or less, cost too.  

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12 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

 

 

Those look like good numbers to me.  Sadly, the engines have been, for lack of  a better word, castrated for emissions.   However, much of the enjoyment of camping is the trip itself.   Now, for the better part of our lives we rush, rush and rush some more.  Certainly when camping "rush" should not be in one's vocabulary.   With that said,  be that guy who sits in the right lane with the cruise control  set at 55 mph.   For the years I have owned my 54 I always get the sense,  at stop lights, that I need to get up to speed quickly to keep the other drivers who are rushing, rushing and rushing...happy.    Well you know what,  I gave up on that.  I do the speed limit or below in the Buick.  If I'm too slow...go around.  I'm enjoying the ride in my Buick.   Sorry if those behind me may loose 3 minutes in getting to Walmart while waiting on me to get up to speed or I'm not rushing, rushing, rushing.  Certainly I have gotten into unavoidable situations such as your letting a tractor trailer in by moving to the fast lane.  But, we negotiate it and maybe tick off another driver but they would be ticked off anyway because you are on their road that day and should not be so what difference does it make? They own the road right?     Enjoy the drive, be that guy doing the...gasp....speed limit or having the hazards on like a tractor trailer does on very long grades.  The goal is to arrive safely and not make those around you happy with your driving, Buick and camper on the open road. 

 

Just my 3 cents and a pop a-top front porch yammer.  

 

100% this.


I've come to the same realization. Lamar, if you're legally hugging the right lane and doing your best not to inconvenience anyone, the rest is their problem. The few extra seconds it may take them to deal with you is negligible and then they'll be gone. Not your problem, not your job to make their lives easier. Do your thing and let them work out the rest. You're just as much entitled to use the road as anyone else and as long as you're not that guy trying to drive his riding lawnmower down the middle of the interstate, it's all good.

 

It's only the rare a$$hole who makes things difficult anyway. Most folks tend not to be a problem at all and seem to enjoy seeing old cars--I think Lamar's rig would cause as much a stir as any of the cars in his Buick garage! I'd love to see something like that rolling down the highway like I'm 9-years-old again. Too cool!

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2 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

 

Find a '69 or'70 Olds 455 engine.  It's a lot less work, and should be a bolt in. By the time you finish modifying what you have, it will likely be the same , or less, cost too.  

Good choice of engine, but the premium gas would be a killer.

Does you truck pull it much better in the same situation?

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@JohnD1956 , I considered and looked for a 455 for a short while but it would be a tight fit and some fitment problems with AC etc among other things. The 403 is quite an amazing engine aside from the smog crap.  huge bore of 4.35 and short stroke of 3.38.  But the dished pistons and huge chambered heads kill the compression, hence my swapping to some ‘72 350 heads and 307 intake. The interchangeability of parts on these Olds engines is pretty interesting too. 

 @old-tank my 1500 HD pulls the trailer great. And I think hauling the trailer and old Buicks with it over all years has spoiled me and one reason I am seeking some improvement. Will never match up to the EFI but.... Even when we bought it , the trip home from Indiana without weight distribution was no problem.  They claim the aerodynamics of the Airstream design helps with turbulence from trucks and with gas mileage, myth? Maybe86C10A13-B6B1-49F5-8137-89F735D66DFC.thumb.jpeg.bded7d80ded105c8e990f356e6526b5d.jpeg

 

 

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I do not believe it is a myth for the Airstream.  From those that I have spoken with about trailers, Airstream has always come up as forgetting the trailer is back there because it very rarely sways and gets squirrely.   There is a higher price paid for the Airstream but from my conversation they say the trailer is worth the money.   I love your trailer.  It's super nice.  Is that an A/C unit on the roof?  

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, MrEarl said:

my 1500 HD pulls the trailer great.

That truck probably has 3.73 rear gears or greater.  Along with fuel injection and computer controlled transmission that selects the right gear for the situation if is no contest.

Put a tach on the Buick and manually select the gear while givin' it hell.:o

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On 8/21/2019 at 2:11 PM, MrEarl said:

I got over to let a tractor trailer coming in from an exit and after I let him in danged if he didn't just stay along side me while all the time cars and trucks were backing up behind me. We were on a long steep grade so I really couldn't do anything.  I was checking my rear view mirrors and was seeing trucks behind the one on my right so that's the way it stayed for several miles. The truck finally moved on but the ones following him wouldn't give me gap. I couldn't get up enough speed to pass anything on my right so I finally put my blinker on and started merging over to the right and one of the trucks backed down and let me in.

 

You weren't holding anyone up.  They were all just driving along beside you so they could get a good look at your vintage tow vehicle.  Besides that, you were just doing what my wife does all the time.  I think the truckers love it because they get right on her back bumper and start blowing their horn and waving. Those truck drivers sure are a friendly bunch of people. 🤣

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5 hours ago, old-tank said:

That truck probably has 3.73 rear gears or greater.  Along with fuel injection and computer controlled transmission that selects the right gear for the situation if is no contest.

Put a tach on the Buick and manually select the gear while givin' it hell.:o

 

Yep and yep 👍

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Usually, a GM 1500 usually had a 3.42 rear axle ratio with the 5.7L V-8 and THM700 automatic.  Check the SPID label on the glove box door for the axle ratio code.  The 1500HD is really a 3/4 ton truck in 1/2 ton "drag".  They had 8 lug wheels, 6.0L V-8s, and a higher GVW than a normal 1500.  A marketing ploy so that Chevy could advertise "biggest standard engine in its class" sort of things, back then.  Which is it that you have?

 

What's the axle ratio in the wagon?  Tire size?

 

NTX5467

 

 

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As for the "tach" deal, it might be neat to do, but not really needed.  Reason?  With the tire size (rolling radius) and rear axle ratio, the "Mph/1000rpm" figure can be calculated.  Then, knowing the rated power/torque peak rpms, you can then use the vehicle speedometer (which can be calibrated by the Interstate mile markers OR with a GPS device/phone function) to effective serve the same purpose as the added-on tachometer.  So there are some work-arounds to the "tach" issue, to me.  Been there, done that, whether on my old slide rule or "manually" (which can consume some paper to do that).

 

I'd not worry too much about when the 1-2 shift happens, but you might need to manually hold the 2-3 upshift a bit longer for best acceleration.  On my '77 Camaro, the 2-3 would happen at 70mph, but after the 4bbl upgrade, it'd run to 100 in "2" before it started to lay down (probably due to the open element air cleaner top being a bit too close to the top of the carb, as it would start to "blubber" rather than just lose power).  Many THM400s will not do a 3-1 downshift unless the vehicle is below 10mph, at WOT.  It'll go to "2", but not "1", so manual 3-1 downshifts are needed on those particular vehicles.  

 

On lock-up torque converter automatic transmissions, the protocol is to first unlock the torque converter clutch, THEN a "gear" downshift if needed.  When the load is decreased enough, then the torque converter will again lock-up and the trans will upshift automatically, unless the driver has done a manual downshift.  The torque converter lock-up is controlled by vacuum switches, with the gear downshift done by the trans governor calibrations.

 

Once you know the mph/1000rpm in each gear, then you can pay attention to the engine sounds.  Is it "happy" or sounding strained?  Does the speedo needle's sweep slow down or start to at the higher rpms?  All a mater of "feel".  IF you need more than 5000rpm to get done what you want to get done, RECONSIDER what you're trying to do!  Compensate accordingly.

 

Perhaps you need to find a set of factory buckets and console with a Hurst Dual-Gate shifter in it?  Then you can do the manual shifts with no worries of going from "2" to "N" under power.  Might look neat if executed well.

 

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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Keep your Buick all Buick.  Look to see what it would take to put the 370 hp 455 Buick 455 from a '70 Riviera in the engine compartment. TA Performance makes some nice power products for this motor as well.  Run a 3.42 rear end and a beef up a TH 200-4R overdrive transmission (it's a bolt on.)  All GM engines except Chevrolet share a common transmission bellhousing bolt pattern.  The TH 200-4R has a dual pattern (BOP and Chevrolet) bellhousing.)

 

What do the guys on the Olds FAQ site say about more power from a 403.  (All Oldsmobile engines 350 - 403 - 425 - 455 have identical external dimensions. ) 

 

GM used the 403 and 455 Oldsmobile motors in their motorhomes.  How much different were they than what you have now? The Pontiac Trans Am Firebirds a la Smokey and the Bandit came equipped with a 6.6 liter engine.  6.6 liters converts to a 403 Oldsmobile engine if rhe car was equipped with an automatic transmission or a 400 Pontiac if the car was equipped with a four speed manual transmission.  There are (were) a lot of hot 455 Oldsmobile boat engines a number of years ago. 1968 Oldsmobile 455 engines from a Ninety-Eight produced 365 horsepower (pre emissions engine.)

 

Unless you're just plain stuck on the wagon you have,  you might consider a 94 - 96 Buick Roadmaster Estate  wagon with the factory towing package.  Dual cooling - mechanical and electric fans, auxiliary oil and transmission coolers, posi trac rear end, and with the right hitch, a 7,000 lb towing capacity.  The SPID sticker is in the cargo area on the right hand side when you open the gate as a door rather than a tailgate. Look for option V92.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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I think before spending a lot of money on the engine I would stick a 3.73 gear under the rear and see how that works.  You would probably be humming along at more RPM but it should take some of the strain off the engine when towing your camper.

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Why not find a HD2500 GM pickup with the same wheelbase and put the Buick Body on top of that chassis?  At least his Estate Wagon didn't begin life with a 307 Olds motor in it!!!

 

When it was discovered the wagon might not handle the weight of the Airstream, then a more reasonable plan of action should have been formulated, rather than what ensured?  Of perhaps the wagon with trailering options was not really up to the task, regardless of what GM might have claimed?

 

As I recall ONLY the Olds 425s were in the GMC motorhomes, as it used the Toronado drive module.  There might have been some durability changes to the cooling system and such, but I don't recall anything to the motor itself.  The 403 didn't exist back then.

 

Perhaps a '72 Estate Wagon might have made a better platform to start from?  Would have the 455, THM400, heavier rear axle, larger brakes, etc.  Add a few re-tuning items to the engine, an external trans cooler, HD shocks and such.  Then exercise the gas credit cards!!  Or maybe one of the '76 Estate Wagons, with the Delco AM/FM Stereo/CB/Power Antenna sound systems?

 

NTX5467

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On 8/22/2019 at 2:05 PM, old-tank said:

Put a tach on the Buick and manually select the gear while givin' it hell.:o

 

Thanks and I agree Willie, will be adding one once done with the engine upgrades. I've been playing with manually shifting already but need to get more familiar with rpm and shift ranges up and down. The tach will help take up some of the risk of my not being able to hear as well as use to. 😌

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On 8/23/2019 at 9:50 PM, NTX5467 said:

Which is it that you have?

 

As I called out above, it is the 1500 HD. Looked LONG and hard for it with low mileage and not abused. (and green)  Even tried out one with Quadrasteer considering I would be towing a camper with it but became fearful of parts availability. I did like the way it steered though.

 

I research fully the vehicles I buy, this truck has exceeded my expectations. My research also showed that the '79 Estate wagon with 403 and towing package should have served the purpose for which I bought it,  and for some it may, but bottom line  I PERSONALLY wish to have more power

 

 

IMG_0266.thumb.JPG.1a153ed32a53828c703e0f2272ed4ba9.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, MrEarl said:
On 8/22/2019 at 1:05 PM, old-tank said:

Put a tach on the Buick and manually select the gear while givin' it hell.:o

 

Thanks and I agree Willie, will be adding one once done with the engine upgrades. I've been playing with manually shifting already but need to get more familiar with rpm and shift ranges up and down. The tach will help take up some of the risk of my not being able to hear as well as use to. 😌

After the upgrades, maybe a dyno session to see where the peak torque rpm occurs.  Upshift so that it lands in that peak torque range, otherwise you will lose anything gained from the lower gear.  And depending on the gear ratios of the transmission you will be wound up pretty tight before upshifting.  As and example test hook up to your truck and watch what the computer does:  you will probably see 5,000+rpm in some instances.

That also sorta works for drag racing:  remember that "holy chit" run in my old truck with the 264?  Shifting at 5,000 rpm lands the next gear at 2400 rpm (peak torque) for that engine.

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On 8/25/2019 at 9:41 AM, NTX5467 said:

As for the "tach" deal, it might be neat to do, but not really needed.  Reason?  With the tire size (rolling radius) and rear axle ratio, the "Mph/1000rpm" figure can be calculated.  Then, knowing the rated power/torque peak rpms, you can then use the vehicle speedometer (which can be calibrated by the Interstate mile markers OR with a GPS device/phone function) to effective serve the same purpose as the added-on tachometer.  So there are some work-arounds to the "tach" issue, to me.  Been there, done that, whether on my old slide rule or "manually" (which can consume some paper to do that).

 

I'd not worry too much about when the 1-2 shift happens, but you might need to manually hold the 2-3 upshift a bit longer for best acceleration.  On my '77 Camaro, the 2-3 would happen at 70mph, but after the 4bbl upgrade, it'd run to 100 in "2" before it started to lay down (probably due to the open element air cleaner top being a bit too close to the top of the carb, as it would start to "blubber" rather than just lose power).  Many THM400s will not do a 3-1 downshift unless the vehicle is below 10mph, at WOT.  It'll go to "2", but not "1", so manual 3-1 downshifts are needed on those particular vehicles.  

 

On lock-up torque converter automatic transmissions, the protocol is to first unlock the torque converter clutch, THEN a "gear" downshift if needed.  When the load is decreased enough, then the torque converter will again lock-up and the trans will upshift automatically, unless the driver has done a manual downshift.  The torque converter lock-up is controlled by vacuum switches, with the gear downshift done by the trans governor calibrations.

 

Once you know the mph/1000rpm in each gear, then you can pay attention to the engine sounds.  Is it "happy" or sounding strained?  Does the speedo needle's sweep slow down or start to at the higher rpms?  All a mater of "feel".  IF you need more than 5000rpm to get done what you want to get done, RECONSIDER what you're trying to do!  Compensate accordingly.

 

Perhaps you need to find a set of factory buckets and console with a Hurst Dual-Gate shifter in it?  Then you can do the manual shifts with no worries of going from "2" to "N" under power.  Might look neat if executed well.

 

Enjoy!

NTX5467

 

 

 

I got dizzy just reading all that, me thinks I'll just go with a tach.

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, old-tank said:

After the upgrades, maybe a dyno session to see where the peak torque rpm occurs.  Upshift so that it lands in that peak torque range, otherwise you will lose anything gained from the lower gear.  And depending on the gear ratios of the transmission you will be wound up pretty tight before upshifting.

 

Good idea!! The shop who I'm considering helping with heads and cam design has a dyno so all the numbers will be there.

 

6 minutes ago, old-tank said:

That also sorta works for drag racing:  remember that "holy chit" run in my old truck with the 264?  Shifting at 5,000 rpm lands the next gear at 2400 rpm (peak torque) for that engine.

 

I REMEMBER, had a knot on the back of my head all the way home. Haven't done a lot of drag racing since my highschool days and am a bit "sceared" of tearing up the 3 speed in the Century so will look forward to doing a little shifting with the 3 speed TH350 . 😉

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19 hours ago, RivNut said:

Keep your Buick all Buick.

 

Wasn't the 77-79 Riviera and several other series of those years Buicks with high performance needs equipped with 403's?  They were as Buick as could be if you wanted better performance than the 350's. I'm just trying to make the best of a bad situation as possible. In fact I was surprised to not find anyone who had done upgrades to their 403's in the Riviera forum when I did a search there.

19 hours ago, RivNut said:

Look to see what it would take to put the 370 hp 455 Buick 455 from a '70 Riviera in the engine compartment. TA Performance makes some nice power products for this motor as well.  Run a 3.42 rear end and a beef up a TH 200-4R overdrive transmission (it's a bolt on.)  All GM engines except Chevrolet share a common transmission bellhousing bolt pattern.  The TH 200-4R has a dual pattern (BOP and Chevrolet) bellhousing.)

 

All that sounds good and probably doable just a bit more complicated, time consuming and expensive than what I have planned.

 

 

19 hours ago, RivNut said:

What do the guys on the Olds FAQ site say about more power from a 403. 

 

I have been spending quite a bit of time on the Olds sites lately as well as the TransAm sites. There are lot of posts there of especially TransAm owners who have done the intake, head and cam swap that I am considering.  

 

 

19 hours ago, RivNut said:

Unless you're just plain stuck on the wagon you have,  you might consider a 94 - 96 Buick Roadmaster Estate  wagon with the factory towing package. 

 

I'm not just "stuck" on my '79, personally I love everything about it.  I test drove 3 94-95 wagons a few years ago when looking for a more modern Buick but opted for the 93 Riviera. Just wasn't a design or look I could love. Rita and I like everything about the '79 and will be keeping it.

 

 

 

 

Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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13 hours ago, NTX5467 said:

Why not find a HD2500 GM pickup with the same wheelbase and put the Buick Body on top of that chassis?

 

Surely you jest.......right. I never know when to take you serious.

 

13 hours ago, NTX5467 said:

When it was discovered the wagon might not handle the weight of the Airstream, then a more reasonable plan of action should have been formulated, rather than what ensured?  Of perhaps the wagon with trailering options was not really up to the task, regardless of what GM might have claimed?

 

 

I respectfully disagree. I feel I have been carrying out a very "reasonable plan of action". I've evaluated the current engine condition over several months including through compression tests and asked for opinions of that here in relation as to whether or not a full engine build or top end would be advisable. I've determined a top end build would be good and have proceeded with determining what the details of what that would be.  As I commented earlier, maybe the engine and drive train combo was good for the folks who bought and ran these cars in the day and maybe even for some today, but not for me. I wish to have more power on demand, that simple. The rest of the car is up to the task.

 

13 hours ago, NTX5467 said:

Perhaps a '72 Estate Wagon might have made a better platform to start from?  Would have the 455, THM400, heavier rear axle, larger brakes, etc.  Add a few re-tuning items to the engine, an external trans cooler, HD shocks and such.  Then exercise the gas credit cards!!  Or maybe one of the '76 Estate Wagons, with the Delco AM/FM Stereo/CB/Power Antenna sound systems?

 

I stored and shipped overseas several 70's Buick (and Oldsmobile) wagons so had the opportunity to drive and become familiar with them. In short, Rita and I are very happy with the '79 and do not plan on trading anytime soon.

 

 

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On 8/28/2019 at 3:55 PM, MrEarl said:

 

  I wish to have more power on demand, that simple.  

 

 

 

 

I was not kidding about the nitrous kit. One button push and 50 more horses on demand.   Could you imaging purging the system at a stoplight with trailer in tow?  The looks you would get.   What fun!

 

But seriously, I don't know what the answer is that will not cost a bunch of $$$.   Maybe rear gear changes as some have mentioned. 

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  • 9 months later...

Been awhile since I posted so thought I'd merge a post from Post War Technical and try and pick up from there and add some updates. 

 

in regards to

 

Exhaust- I ended up going with a 20" Dynamax Super Turbo installed by a shop that's been doing my exhaust work since the 60's. Just the right length to cut the original pipe and add two short adapters. Also had a longer tailpipe 90* bend and end added to get the pipe out a couple inches past the body trim like original. $120 labor which I found reasonable considering the added tail pipe piece. Sounds great, not loud, no drone   https://www.dynomax.com/mufflers/super-turbo-mufflers

 

Radiator - Replaced plastic with new 3 row all aluminum with pretty much same configuration as stock (not the flat and squared as is typical with a 3 core)  but of course thicker. Considered painting it black but since so much else on the old girl has gotten modified decided to just leave it aluminum. $190 from Radiators4Less

radiator.thumb.jpg.b343ae8d10412788512ca2b176565a8b.jpg

 

 

Water pump -  FlowKooler, High Flow  https://www.summitracing.com/parts/BRA-1775     with a   Stewart High Performance 180* thermostat  https://www.summitracing.com/parts/EMP-301

 

As some may recall, I was having serious problems with fluctuating temperatures and overheating with temps on hot days around 210-220 and while towing reaching 225+. Now with the 3 row radiator, and high flow pump and thermostat the temperature stays at a constant of between 170-180.

 

Transmission cooler. Fabricated brackets and installed TWO Fin and Plate type coolers in line about 4 inches in front of the condenser/radiator.  https://www.summitracing.com/parts/DER-13613  This may have been overkill after getting the engine/coolant temperature down but feel very confident the newly rebuilt transmission will be safe now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 3 months later...

Bringing this up to date again. So after giving a well-intentioned guy over on one of the Olds forum the go ahead with doing the engine manifold, heads, cam etc upgrades to the 403 but getting frustrated with the small amount of response and communication after 6 weeks, I pulled the plug on that and decided to try getting the Quadrajet rebuilt (as many here have suggested) or finding and swapping to a 455.  

 

After reading through Cliff Ruggles book on q'jets, not feeling confident enough that I could do the rebuild and not wanting to have to pull my carb off and send it to him and wait 8-10 weeks to get it back, I found a guy in South Carolina who's "been rebuilding Quadrajets for 20 years", had a nice clean one that matched the numbers on my carb and could get it to me in 5-6 days, I went for that. My local shop swapped it out but it was no better than mine. Called the carb guy, was told he'd get another one to me and once swapped send the first one back. Turns out it was no better than the first. Finally let the previous owner of my shop who is old school mechanic/race car guy rebuild mine. He also pulled any of the smog junk off. I was shocked at the difference in power and response of the 403. After all this worry and fear of the 403 not having sufficient power to pull the 4,500 lb Airstream Argosy, I should have listened to some of you and had the carb rebuilt long ago. I just never believed a carb could be SO bad as to create the loss of power I was having with the 403, period. I recently hooked up the wagon to the Argosy and pulled it through some northeast Georgia hills to a state park with NO problem of it pulling the grades, making me ONE HAPPY CAMPER!!!!!!  Well until I checked the gas mileage.... 7.5 mpg but there again, there was a lot of hill climbing with that. 

 

For those who like pictures here's a few of the 1st carb the guy in SC rebuilt. Lesson learned, pretty doesn't = performance

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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So after getting the engine, transmission and suspension to the point that I was comfortable with hitting the road with the Argosy in tow, I knew I wanted to be comfortable while ON THE ROAD knowing that all was good with the engine and tranny. I didn't want to be surprised by a red dash light flashing on  telling me "something" was already wrong. To that end I decided to add a full set of gauges ie. water temp, oil pressure, transmission fluid temperature and volts IN ADDITION to the warning "idiot" lights. 

Went with AutoMeter Sport Comp analog electrical and retroed a panel to match the wood grain dash of the wagon. Started out with this

 

1699779344_Screenshot_2020-09-30SpeedwayUniversal4GaugeDashPanelBrushed.png.8aa64e50591e5f97f93f99dcf3035688.png

 

added some adhesive backed wood grain and a 1/4 inch door chrome trim piece and ended up with this

 

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Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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Next I figured out and  built a wiring harness in the comfort of our dining room vs while laying upside down like a pretzel under the dash.

 

 

IMG_3010.thumb.JPG.b4a46c14360ec67bbfe72eaa8463a5f5.JPG

 

 

I then installed the panel using a 90 degree drill attachment I had bought probably 10 years ago and never used til now.

 

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After probing with my voltage tester as to why one light wasn't working determined it was the #$%*$#  bulb. Trip to Oriellys for a bulb and all was good.

 

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Then it was on to the sending units which was made a bit more complicated by wanting to maintain the warning lights.

 

 

Built the oil gauge/light splitter out of several brass fittings from Lowes.

 

 

 

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Summit Racing furnished a radiator hose fitting for the water temperature gauge that I mounted as close as possible to the engine and thermostat and grounded it to the engine.

 

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The hardest thing for me to figure out was the source for the electrical which ended up being made simple by this little bugger here, called a fuse tap add-a-fuse. Never knew they existed, best invention since peanut butter.  

 

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Took off from the radio 10 amp fuse and used a 5 amp for the new gauges.

 

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1 minute ago, MrEarl said:

The hardest thing for me to figure out was the source for the electrical which ended up being made simple by this little bugger here, called a fuse tap add-a-fuse. Never knew they existed, best invention since peanut butter.  

 

IMG_3012.PNG.d9b83edc83184320d0a0f700a1b72537.PNG

 

 

Took off from the radio 10 amp fuse and used a 5 amp for the new gauges.

 

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Someone installed a couple in my car... now I just need to find what they are powering!  You may want to label for any future work.

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2 minutes ago, NC-car-guy said:

Someone installed a couple in my car... now I just need to find what they are powering!  You may want to label for any future work.

 

and take away all their fun... nahhhh 😄

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I did have some good friends come in out of the rain to help though

 

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and this guy was literally UNDER FOOT all the while adding to the discomfort of laying upside down like a pretzel under the dash and steering wheel.

 

 

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Results:

 

Water temp of 175* while cruising at around 80* outside temperature. 190-195* while sitting in traffic.

Oil around 45 while cruising, 30 or so at idle

Transmission, 155 was the highest seen even while pulling several steep grades in a row

Volts 12.5 with ignition on, 14.5 while cruising. The wagon does have a tow package hi-amp alternator

All warning lights still come on either when ignition on or while cranking as should.

 

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Tachometer is up next, sometime over the winter. Right now, the Century and the Buick Sales and Service are calling.

 

Edited by MrEarl (see edit history)
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41 minutes ago, old-tank said:

Is that transmission pan stock for that car or did I miss the upgrade?


Definitely an upgrade Willie. Tried a deeper one first but wasn’t speed hump friendly so swapped to this. Very well made of heavy steel, is a bit deeper,  so increases fluid volume some and the air flow tubes work great...  as long as you’re moving. I now have two stacked plate coolers mounted in front of the radiator which appears to be keeping tranny fluid well below the 170-180 range. I asked my tranny guy if it’s possible to run too cool, he asked if it was shifting good. I told him it was and he just said run it, it’ll just make his rebuild last forever. 😊

 

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/der-14200?seid=srese1&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-9OHzP2R7AIVho3ICh3HSA4OEAQYAyABEgKGAvD_BwE

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