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Hudsy Wudsy

1929 Olds R/S Roadster $4,000 C/L MN

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The wood work itself is not that hard though many try and convince you otherwise or that you have to have extra special talents. I learned to work with wood in my high school industrial arts classes. Yes, I did take advanced classes but they were also split between wood and metal shop. Those same classes are where I learned to run lathes and Bridgeport machines which I now also own and use in my current shop to restore these cars. I do have some better equipment than most but that equipment helps me save time more than anything else. The real difficult part about doing wood cars is getting the metal skins off and on but that only becomes an issue in the later year closed cars. Open and earlier cars (30 and before) are not as difficult as most closed cars from those years have the metal split at the belt line and covered with a molding. Getting the metal just right on the new wood just takes patience and time, sometimes requiring you to put the metal on and off numerous times for fitting. Thing is the people telling others that the wood work is difficult are those who really don’t do much of their own restoration or might be good at bolt on stuff or even paint but not good at being able to create things by hand. Wood working is a “by hand” creative art and some who can’t do it, label it hard or steer others away from what they can’t do themselves. Before I get all kinds of negative comments, I’m not picking on anyone, just stating some are better than others at certain things and that doesn’t necessarily mean what they’re good at is really that hard to do. It’s just hard for some.

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One of the most daunting aspects of wood work is that there is sometimes almost nothing left of the original wood. As long as there is enough left to serve as a reasonable guide for the new parts I agree that it is mainly a question of careful,  methodical work.

 

Greg

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One should probably be realistic about the time and cost involved. At a minimum most people would need to buy a bunch of tools. I already had them. Then there is figuring out how to build the wood framing with no patterns. My late father was a master woodworker, and there was always a lot of reading material laying around when I was growing up. I have a very good idea what grain direction will provide strength, and how thermal expansion varies with grain direction, how to arrange boards to cancel changes in curvature due to humidity, the difference between quartersawn and flatsawn boards, the uselessness of end grain as a gluing surface, etc. etc. It seems so me all this would be a steep expensive learning curve for just one car, if you were someone who was never exposed to woodworking.

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For what it's worth, the ad for the Olds has been deleted. I'd like to think that someone here bought it to restore it, but that probably isn't likely. I'm sure that in another year or two it will have had any bad wood replaced by one inch square tubing and will sport a new frame with a new crate engine.

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18 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

...and be worth fifty to sixty thousand dollars.

After spending 120G  to make it that. 

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Maybe or maybe not. Imagine that you own a body shop with several employees. There are times of the year when you have more than enough work to keep a crew busy, but there are slow times, also. If you have to  pay your employees anyway, you may as well have a few projects around to help offset the salary outlay and satisfy your itch to create street rods.

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