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nick8086

Will the orphan car survive..

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The article begins, 

"Sean Gambino, a portfolio manager at Heron Bay Capital LLC, timed the market right.

He bought his two classic cars — a 1986 BMW M6 and a 1986 Porsche 911 Cabriolet —

in 2003 and 2008, respectively. That was just before prices for vintage vehicles such as

Ferrari Spyders and MGs began to take off, with measures of interest in collectibles

surging to record highs by mid-2015."

 

I've heard that some Ferrari prices may boom and burst;

but is that the case for MG's?  Really?

Are MG's "taking off"?  It sounds more like sensationalism. 

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On ‎11‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 9:20 AM, John_S_in_Penna said:

Sorry to be critical of the article, but I think it's a

shallow, valueless piece written by a newswoman

who knows nothing about cars, and who just had an

assignment to fulfill.  And the whole tone of the piece

sees cars as commodities, missing the whole point of

ownership.

 

If Miss or Mrs. Verhage, the author, could spend a day

with a long-term hobbyist, take a scenic ride in an old car,

meet the family that has owned the car for 20 years,

go to a club event where she would see the camaraderie

the hobby offers, she would get a far more realistic picture.

 

She would then stop thinking of cars as statistics.

Maybe then she'd even want to get an old car for her family.

 

There's far more to antique cars than tracking money. 

I agree! Most likely Ms. Verhage's significant other has a garage full and she isn't getting enough attention. Will the orphan car survive???? It already has ! I agree that the common prewar stuff is in for a price correction. Just my opinion.

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On ‎11‎/‎19‎/‎2017 at 8:56 AM, 1937hd45 said:

I don't know anyone with a 1986 "classic", and don't care to meet any.

 

Bob 

Sorry to hear about your narrow mindedness.

 

I have a friend who owns a 1986 Buick Grand National.  He keeps it in pristine condition, and regularly shows it during the summer.  If one has read the comparison between the Grand National and the Nissan GT-R in the September Hemmings Motor News, its more than capable holding its own in the six-cylinder league.  Once again, a misdirected decision on GM's part to discontinue a high-performance turbocharged six cylinder that would have made an excellent North American tuner car offering.

 

Craig

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I agree with Craig. Grand Nationals are great cars and another overlooked car from that era that has "timeless" styling [but not the performance of the Grand National] and is underappreciated is the Buick Reatta. Of course I am biased owning 3 of them and 2 table top models...

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29 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

I have a friend who owns a 1986 Buick Grand National.  He keeps it in pristine condition, and regularly shows it during the summer.  If one has read the comparison between the Grand National and the Nissan GT-R in the September Hemmings Motor News, its more than capable holding its own in the six-cylinder league.  Once again, a misdirected decision on GM's part to discontinue a high-performance turbocharged six cylinder that would have made an excellent North American tuner car offering.

 

Craig

 

I have to agree. When they finally put that motor in the 1989 Trans Am Turbo Pace Car, it became one heck of a machine--the fastest-accelerating Trans Am of all time. Power of the Grand National with brakes and handling (finally!) to match. Add in limited edition status and a sublimely subtle look, and you have a car that's a definite collectable despite being fairly recent. I LOVE this car!

 

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If you're not familiar with these one-year-only oddities, here are some details: http://www.harwoodmotors.com/vehicles/inventory_details.php?id=781

 

Late-model collectables are not common, but sometimes things come together just right to create something special and we should be aware of them in real time so that we can preserve them for the future. Everybody knew the Duesenberg "Twenty Grand" was special, they knew the '53 Buick Skylark was special, even when they were new. Age is but one determinant of collectability--more often than not, it's a happy confluence of factors to create something that couldn't (or shouldn't) exist or existed for only a very brief moment in time, yet defining an era. I think cars like the Grand National, Mustang 5.0, and Trans Am Turbo all define the second renaissance of factory performance, and that alone makes them worthy of note. Would we have 700+ horsepower Dodge sedans today if not for those big, black, blown Buicks stomping Corvettes into the pavement back in the '80s? I think not.

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On ‎2017‎-‎11‎-‎20 at 5:03 AM, John_S_in_Penna said:

The article begins, 

"Sean Gambino, a portfolio manager at Heron Bay Capital LLC, timed the market right.

He bought his two classic cars — a 1986 BMW M6 and a 1986 Porsche 911 Cabriolet —

in 2003 and 2008, respectively. That was just before prices for vintage vehicles such as

Ferrari Spyders and MGs began to take off, with measures of interest in collectibles

surging to record highs by mid-2015."

 

I've heard that some Ferrari prices may boom and burst;

but is that the case for MG's?  Really?

Are MG's "taking off"?  It sounds more like sensationalism. 

 

I am a MG guy going way back to my first MGA bought as a 15 year old in 1974. They have definitely become more expensive over the years but have never had what I would consider a "Boom". Just a slow gradual upward increase.  The supply is good for all of the standard postwar models. I doubt there is any real "profit " for an investor unless someone found an outstandingly original car at a bargain price.  Post war "T" series cars are what I consider remarkably cheap. They haven't gone up much in value at all for at least the last 20 years.  The MGA twin cam is an exception , along with any genuine "works" prepared racing cars or very well known privateer competition cars . But this segment of the market is a specialised niche and very small.  And if anything MG's lag behind many other British makes in regard to prices realised for historic examples. They are great fun at a modest price.

 

Greg in Canada

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