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How to Remove Paint Spilled onto Car

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Does anyone have a surefire method of removing house paint that was spilled onto a car that might leave the original paint intact?

 

 

 

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Try "Easy Off" oven cleaner. Spray it on, wait a few minutes to soften then wipe it off. I use it to take old enamel lettering off trucks without damaging the vehicle finish. Don't do this in the hot sun. I suggest you test a small spot first because I don't know how it will work on house paint.

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Jesus, oven cleaner?!? That seems a little harsh and could certainly damage the paint underneath. That stuff will eat anything.

 

If it's latex paint, let it dry and scrape as much off by hand or with a plastic scraper, not metal. Then you should be able to use a mild buffing compound and/or a clay bar to remove the rest. If the car paint is in good condition, the latex paint won't stick to it very well so it should peel of relatively easily once it's cured.

 

There's no easy solution--this is going to take a lot of time and hand work if you really want to save the paint underneath. Good luck!

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I would say water, but that's before it dried.  Denatured alcohol should work on fairly new latex paint.  Shouldn't touch the car paint but will soften up the latex.  Try it on an inconspicuous spot on your paint first just to be sure.

Good luck

Scott

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I learned the oven cleaner trick from the painter that hand letters our company trucks & pin strips my brass cars. When we had to change our area code about 15 years ago we had to re-letter our trucks. We called him in and he used Easy Off to remove the old "One Shot" enamel paint, the paint that most of us use for striping. Since then I always use it to remove the lettering off company vans before we trade them in.  The dealer used to deduct for "Remove & Repaint" from trade-in value. I can tell you it works on removal of enamel without damaging factory finish. It will leave a dull residue you will have to wax off but it won't damage the finish. It may affect air dried repaint jobs but not factory finish. I can't tell you how it will work on latex house paint but it is worth a try.

 

You are not going to be able to scrape it off if it has dried in the hot sun for several days. And you certainly can't buff it off without buffing through the clean finish next to the spill. .....Easy Off..... It works.

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I'll take your word for it, but I'd be nervous as hell spraying oven cleaner on my car's paint. But if it works, it would sure be a handy trick.

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I would also recommend the metholated spirits. 

If it is water based house paint,  the meths on a rag will soften the paint so you can wipe it off and if the car has factory paint on it the meths should not affect it at all but try a small spot under the hood or trunk to test it.

Edited by DavidAU
spelling (see edit history)

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Step two, lose that painters phone number.

This wouldn't be that same Samurai that had the stuck lug nut would it?

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)

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Thank you for all of the suggestions. The car is a 1970 Jeep Commando that has been in storage for several years. There is no insurance (nick8086) since it has been sitting for so long. A family member just bought it. They are out of town for several weeks. When they get back we will try out the suggestions to see if any of them work. I will post the results. Thanks again and if there are other ideas, please post them.

 

Steve

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Hopefully you can read the label on the paint can, then approach the tech. rep. for that company. They might have some ideas as to what works on their paint.

 

The longer you leave it, the harder it will be to get off.

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Lacquer thinner is another possibility as long as the original finish wasn't lacquer... which in the case of the Jeep is unlikely. The problem with all of these suggestions is that if the underlying paint is badly oxidized, you will probably rub through before you get all the house paint off. I wish you luck, but I've been faced with this predicament on a customer's car before, and ended up doing a complete repaint. 

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The oven cleaner trick works well provided the base paint isn't lacquer. I made some videos on how I used it to removed painted pin striping:

 

 

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On 11/10/2017 at 5:39 PM, Matt Harwood said:

Jesus, oven cleaner?!? That seems a little harsh and could certainly damage the paint underneath. That stuff will eat anything.

 

Agreed. Oven cleaner is caustic soda. It is the same stuff that was used in "hot tanks" in machine shops back in the day to strip blocks. Many years ago, I have used easy-off to strip engines for repainting. It removes paint, oil, baked on carbon, brass, aluminum, zinc, skin, whatever flesh is under the skin, etc....

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