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Corvair Greenbier


hullinger
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On a properly running Corvair, you set them once and forget them. They are hydraulic lifters, just like SBC. They get adjusted when changing push rod tube o-rings, or the oil gets dirty on high mileage engines and a lifter can stick, so I adjusted many to run as solids back in the day of daily drivers owned by cheap people.

 

At least you didn't ask if they get adjusted hot or cold. That gets a hot discussion going on Corvair forums.:D

 

Typical maintenance items of the 60s. Tune up every 12 K or so, points/condenser/rotor. Oil changes every 3 K miles or so. Replace the 50 year old xxxx that finally failed after xxx miles.  Change the fan belt regularly if manual transmission, rarely on Powerglide models, assuming you drive it spirtedly!;)

 

These Corvair FCs* autocross great! 4 wheel independent suspension. Ride is waay better than a "Chevy van".

 

*Forward Control, came in Greenbrier shown, panel van Corvair 95, Loadside the pick up, and Rampside, the pick up with the side loading ramp. Excellent for motorcycle hauling.

 

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2 hours ago, hullinger said:

Oh, that's cool.  How long ago did it sell?  Looks like a fun and somewhat easy restoration for someone.  -Chris

I sold it in 2016. I would probably have clear coated and kept that patina. It was running and driving and the wiring in the engine was relatively new. 

It had sat a few years since my dad was ill, but he was a mechanic and took good care of his cars. Put in a new battery and It fired right up. 

556D6A79-A300-4463-A06A-5C2DACF49ED5.jpeg

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10 hours ago, mike6024 said:

Sounds like it's running well. Have you done any major engine work? What is the maintenance like? Are regular valve adjustments required?

Mike, yea, she's running really well.  The stainless band that holds the muffler down recently broke off so the muffler rattles around but otherwise, she's really a super dependable and reliable ride.  When I first got the van 8 years ago I went through the ignition system, did everything in the brake system last year but otherwise, a perfect and carefree vehicle during those 10K miles.  It really surprises me.  

 

Chris 

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9 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

On a properly running Corvair, you set them once and forget them. They are hydraulic lifters, just like SBC. They get adjusted when changing push rod tube o-rings, or the oil gets dirty on high mileage engines and a lifter can stick, so I adjusted many to run as solids back in the day of daily drivers owned by cheap people.

 

At least you didn't ask if they get adjusted hot or cold. That gets a hot discussion going on Corvair forums.:D

 

Typical maintenance items of the 60s. Tune up every 12 K or so, points/condenser/rotor. Oil changes every 3 K miles or so. Replace the 50 year old xxxx that finally failed after xxx miles.  Change the fan belt regularly if manual transmission, rarely on Powerglide models, assuming you drive it spirtedly!;)

 

These Corvair FCs* autocross great! 4 wheel independent suspension. Ride is waay better than a "Chevy van".

 

*Forward Control, came in Greenbrier shown, panel van Corvair 95, Loadside the pick up, and Rampside, the pick up with the side loading ramp. Excellent for motorcycle hauling.

 

Hey Frank, great information.  Thanks for sharing so much.  -Chris

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Reminds me of the panel van I had back in the day. Think I paid $200, would have paid 3 but second gear was missing so valve float first and lug third - was a three speed manual.

 

ps didn't three speeds have black shift knobs and four speeds white ?

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Only in the cars. All FCs had black shift knobs. You should have asked around back then, as most Corvair people had 3 speeds sitting around for very little money. Any 60 to 65 three speed would have worked for you. Not a "used parts emporium", they always wanted top dollar for parts.:(

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Here is a sweet pair .....

 

The Model 95 Rampside is turbocharged direct fuel injected.

 

I have a standing offer to buy it if he ever wants to sell it - the only vehicle I ever hauled that I offered to buy ....

 

 

Jim

 

 

file-5 (12).jpeg

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On 11/8/2017 at 2:29 AM, victorialynn2 said:

I sold it in 2016. I would probably have clear coated and kept that patina. It was running and driving and the wiring in the engine was relatively new. 

It had sat a few years since my dad was ill, but he was a mechanic and took good care of his cars. Put in a new battery and It fired right up. 

556D6A79-A300-4463-A06A-5C2DACF49ED5.jpeg

 

 

I'm curious about the throttle cable guide attached to the firewall.  I don't have that on my Rampside.  Was that original or was it added?  What is the purpose of the guide?

Edited by Roger Frazee
Better readability (see edit history)
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I am sure that someone that owns a greenbriar will speak up, but if it is like the station wagon I think there was an attachment to the front of engine shield.  It has been a long time since I looked at one.  Sold my wagons years ago.  I do not believe the white bracket is factory.  Maybe a fix for a problem with the original attachment.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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The 61 Corvairs had manual choke. So all 61s had the two choke cables (2 carbs) joined at a connector/bracket on the firewall to mate to the single choke cable going to the dashboard. 

 

The station wagon was a "car" so the throttle linkage was through the tunnel to the transmission and then up to the engine. FCs did not have a tunnel, so a cable was used for the throttle, and all except early versions, the cable comes through the firewall. That cable guide was added for ???

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I really have no idea what it’s putpise is or if he added it, but for comparison, here is a pic of the engine in his 61 Rampy. My father was a mechanic in the AF and worked on cars since he was at least 16. I’m sure there was a reason but we will never know what it was. 

 

In the Fairlane, there are a couple weird things. One is a batter shut off switch. I assume it is to prevent fires and battery drain? I also switch it off when I put in in the garage. Another is an on/off switch under the dash for the top motor. I don’t think it’s factory but I’m not sure. Again I have no idea why. Maybe to prevent battery drain? I’m not even sure he added those but he’s had the car since the 80’s so it’s possible. 

F970E84E-B6C7-42C0-92D2-916021E62431.jpeg

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