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Hi I have a 1923 Buick 4 Dr I think they they call it 7pass it is a 20 ft car there is no rust out but the paint is very thin all over runs and starts as it should brakes are good also. Will add pic. Soon. Thanks. Mike you tell me what it's worth. .. What about $8,000.00?

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Edited by Mikefit
addws photot (see edit history)
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A friend of mine had a '26 Chrysler Model 60 4dr, fully and nicely restored a few years back, excellent condition and running,  listed for many months this past summer at $12K Canadian(about $9K US), eventually sold for $9K Canadian, about US$6500, and needed very little. My guess is the Buick would sell around US$4-$5K or less. Just not much demand for old cars these days, even less for big 4dr sedans. Just my thoughts. 

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It does look to a pretty nice car to have. I love what looks like the original paint. For me, the newer gold crushed velour upholstery is a turn off. But is sure looks comfortable. I see it has 1926 -1927 Buick headlights as well as later cowl lights. Also the non Buick taillight.

P5230152.thumb.JPG.88cff79376f9d092780b9b2389220fc4.JPGWhat the correct 1923 headlights look like.

5a071a328b669_1923BuickRoaster_4.jpg.0decbf2ceea58616491730e4d9ae14a6.jpg1923 style Cowl lights.

A good bit of money for a car in this condition. But the 124" WB 7 passenger Model 50 is a lot of car.

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With the paint issues and some incorrect components as noted I would consider this to be a #4-#3 car. My 2003 Price guide indicates about $4,000 for a #4 to a $8,000 high for a #3 condition. I use the 2003 figures (which were always high) since that is what I have seen these 20s cars actually sell for. Again popularity for open cars pushes the prices. The big sedans are always a hard sell unless they are a true bargain. Last year a 1923-55 Sport touring in the same #4-#3 condition sold for $8,500 with a parts car. The 2003 guide gives the range as $6,000-$12,000. It sat on the forum for several months. I then called and negotiated for another month. I was given the purchase price by the new owner. $1,250 less than I offered!...... Oh well the buyer was local.

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Yes I would like to thank you all for your input seeing it from a different set of eyes after I put this car on here I thought I should have been on the pre war site 20/20 hind sight. If I put in on ebay I would have to over price it by 2k just to pay the fees. Or in on C/L I would have to buy a gun to protect myself.  !!!!!!!!! Just my thoughts you guys are the greatest.   Mike

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Love the car overall.  Some good points have been raised. I'm happy to see there has been some interest generated. I'd love to have the car but the shop is full and I already have a 1923 that is awaiting attention. Good luck with the sale. 

 

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Can you share what info is on the cowl tag?

The reason I ask is because the valve cover and starter generator are not 1923, they are earlier.

Engine serial # ? It's stamped in the aluminum crankcase on a pad near the oil fill pipe.

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John Beatty and I talked about this car earlier this evening.  Brian Heil has a good eye for '23 Buicks and I agree with his thought about the engine.  I quickly looked at this posting earlier in the week and quite honestly I didn't pay that much attention to the details - I have a big project on my mind these days and that is getting the new roof on my shop building.  John and I think that maybe the engine could have been changed out at some point in time.  If Mikefit will post the engine number, we can determine what year the engine is.  This old Buick looks to be in pretty decent condition.  The book,  BUICK - THE COMPLETE HISTORY shows that 10,279 of this model was produced for the 1923 model year.  I was really somewhat surprised that there were that many made.  This was an expensive model compared to the Roadster and Touring models.  The engine in this car looks like the one in our 1922 Model 48.  I hope the fellow will post the engine number for us.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I would love to know just where you guys are finding Buicks like this for $4000... I really want a 7-passenger Buick and I've been looking for one for over a year that I can afford. I'm not a collector. I want something that I can enjoy with my family of 6. I'd be happy with a boring 1929 and I don't mind a wrong taillight or incorrect upholstery. I'm just looking for something that's drive-able as is, doesn't look terrible, and has a good title. (And isn't more than 500 miles from Louisville, KY) I can't find anything! This one was the cheapest I've found, but I can't swing the $8k MikeFit wants for it. I would suspect it's probably worth it from what I've seen. The only things I see in the $4k range look like the mess that Mike6024 posted. 

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Nlogsdon,

 

Not to sound negative, but If you want a particular car, you can not just look locally, and a 500 mile radius is local in the old car hobby. 

 

The most recent car that I bought, I went and picked it up outside of Reno and I live in the Detroit area.  It was a 4,500 mile road trip with a friend.  Either you go or you can pay someone to ship it to you. 

 

One of my trucks I had I drove to Orlando to pick up the truck and that was about a 2,400 mile trip that I took with my son to help with the driving.

 

I took a car that I bought in Detroit and sold it at Hershey.  It is enroute to Prague, Czech Republic as we speak.  That is where the new owner lives and is taking the car.

 

Going to where the car is that you want is just a function of the hobby.  If you wait long enough you might find what you want but it will be tougher and may never happen.

 

PS: welcome to the forums.  If you find anything outside of 500 miles, there are a lot of us that will be happy to look at the car for you.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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Ok here's what I found out from the owners manual starter is a model 640a ???? Delco. It starts the engine and charges the battery can't ask for anything better . Will look for engine numbers and dash numbers should be a Series 23_Six_50 124" wheel base.  Thanks. Mike

 

 

 

 

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Well, no. My fond memories of going places with my grandfather happened in a 1982 Lincoln. But that's not what I'm interested in.


I'm going to go off on a rant here for a minute... I apologize in advance for the fact that this is slightly off-topic, but it does apply to much of this thread. I've heard an awful lot of people whom I assume are in their 60's-80's who are crying that 1) there's no younger generations interested in these cars and they're going to lock up their engines in museums and 2) their cars are losing value because said younger folks aren't interested. Myself and a number of my friends in our 30's would beg to differ. The truth is we can't afford to pay $30k for a Model A and so the old guys donate their cars to museums for the tax write-off instead of selling it for something reasonable.

 

Now, here we see a bunch of folks tearing apart this fellow's Buick and telling him that all the parts are wrong and telling him it's worth $4k based on 15-year-old pricing books and a supposed sales history that I sure can't find. Kinda harsh. So, after thoroughly crushing his hopes, then you all tell me that I just need to cough up the big money for it. So either it's worth $4k, or it's worth $8k. It can't be both. Way to welcome two newbies... Maybe there's a reason why the big associations are suffering for new members. 

Anyway, I'm sorry for the rant. Just getting tired of running into these sorts of situations. It's always "my car is worth a small fortune, but I'll buy you a pizza in trade for yours..." Now in all honesty, this Buick IS probably worth $7-$8k. I can't do that right now, so I guess I'll have to let this one pass too. But I sure would like to know where you folks keep finding these running, driving, 20-foot-lookers with nice period upholstery for $4,000-$5,000.  

Oh well... 

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4 hours ago, Nlogsdon said:

".....................welcome two newbies... "

 

HEY !!!!  WELCOME YOU TWO NEWBIES !!!!!  Let's see : At 73 I fall right about in the middle of the 60s and 80s group of guys here trying to wear two hats. Kind of caught in the middle between one great guy we would like to see get good money for his car , and another great guy we would love to see being able to afford a car he can realistically drive and enjoy before he is as old as we are. It is way past my geriatric bedtime , so please allow me to just splatter out some thoughts as they occur to me for what they may be worth. 

 

In response #17 , Bryan refers to what might have been the best open , public deal on a beginners entry level 1920s sedan yet this year. I remember it fairly well. I also remember myself and others emphatically encouraging Bryan to pull the trigger on his find. This would have been a better car , with its 4 wheel brakes. You might have to wait 5 or 10 years to find an equal deal.

 

The Buick here being considered is unusually complete (disregarding upholstry) , and solid for its ancient age. I believe the running boards are original. If so , the drivers side we see is remarkably wear free. Other cues , visual and the fact that it may run very well , indicate that it is quite solid , and probably not much of a project at all.

 

I would like to know how much experience you have with cars of the '20s. Or 'teens or '30s for that matter. The great thing about an old "old car nut" is that we old ones have an enormous amount of experience. That is why you came to us. And we are absolutely delighted to have been asked to be "in the loop". We are here for both of you , and all others , now , and for as long as this wonderful , non suffering "big association" , the incredibly well run AACA shall stand , as it has for so long.

 

It took me only about 3 years to find my 1924 Cadillac. 20 to find my 1927 Cadillac. They were both good deals. I will expand on the process I went through , the learning curve , and how it applies to your search. But first you need to tell me more about your experience level , and what the reasons are that you are considering the range of candidate cars. The particular Buick in question is not really far from you , right ? It is important for you to start getting experience with cars you are considering , and making well considered offers. Start thinking multi purpose trips. Anything else to do in the region of this car ? 

 

I sense your frustration , but feel it may be somewhat misplaced. You are in extremely good hands here. Have you joined AACA ?  - Carl

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Thank-you for the thoughts. I have not joined yet. Maybe I will. I gave up a hobby building and competition shooting muzzle loaders a couple of years ago because the national organization was poorly run due to it being populated by old men who swore the hobby was dying because they couldn't get your people interested. I ran for the board of directors, won a seat, and tried to help, but they didn't want to encourage younger folks in the hobby and I eventually got discouraged. I've heard similar grumblings about various classic car-related organizations. Hopefully you're right and this one is different. 

 

Here's what I can tell you about me: I am a competent craftsman and I can work pretty well with wood and metal. I am fairly mechanically skilled and I do all my own modern vehicle repairs. I have a 1929 Gazelle Mercedes kit that my grandfather and a friend put together back in the 70's. I maintained it for the last decade of my grandfather's life and I have owned it since his death in 2004. I realize that it's different from a real period car as far as function. That said, I don't have any qualms about taking on the challenge of operating and maintaining an early car. There's an incredible amount of information available on the internet and I do have an understanding of how they function. 

 

I am also an historian and as such, I prefer original historic vehicles to replicas and hot rods. I have virtually no interest in vehicles from the late 30's forward. I think the lines of 20''s cars are the best ever made. (My opinion only. I hold no animosity toward folks who like later models. That's their thing, not mine.) I also participate with a group of historical reenactors who re-create the early days of motor camping, hunting, fishing, and other outdoor sports. (One of the most rewarding hobbies I've ever enjoyed.) I have four children, aged newborn to 8 years old. My family enjoys participating with me, however, we can no longer fit everyone in the tiny Gazelle. The obvious solution is to find a 7 passenger car that we can all enjoy. Unfortunately, I don't have a ton of money to throw at it. I'd be happy to sell the Gazelle in spite of the sentimental reasons for keeping it. That said, the market is flooded with them, and even with mine being better than most, there's just not much demand for them. 

 

I don't mind doing some work on a car. Body and paint work is no problem for me. What I don't want to get into is something that will need a massive mechanical overhaul, or a complete interior rebuild. That's where my skills get weak, mainly on the financial level. I do have the ability to haul a vehicle with my enclosed trailer, but traveling 2000 miles to pick up a car will end up costing more than what I'd probably save on a good deal. Hence the 500-mile radius I've set for myself. I have looked outside that range, but it seems that pricing isn't much different across the country. 

 

Thanks for understanding my frustration. The way this and a few other threads I've seen have gone lately, it seemed like there was a secret market for $4,000 to $5,000 good vehicles. That obviously doesn't exist. Got my hopes up a bit. I think it's probably a case of people trying to lowball an unsuspecting newbie by claiming absurd market values that are few and far between and certainly not average. I will continue to save and hunt, which was my plan all along, until I got excited over this Buick and the fantasy that it may have been in my price range. 

 


 

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Mike,

         Your car is very unique, and it's all about finding the right buyer.  The big attraction to your car are the woodspoke wheels and the 7 passenger seats.  The distraction is the yellow interior. Have you considered going to an upholstery shop, or looking in an Eastwood catalog and thought of dying the interior brown?  A cheap sprayer- I think even a $5 hand pump sprayer is all you need.  I had a Porsche 944 and the entire carpeted section behind the rear glass was baked white from the sun.  It used to be black.  I bought black dye, sprayed it on and let it dry.  Honestly, it looked like new.  I was shocked.  It was a permanent fix too.  It didn't just rub off.  You can try this on a test spot.  Pull up the back seat and try it on a piece of the fabric.  This is just an example of minimal work to maximize your return.  Armoral the tires, buff up what paint you have, shine up everything else with chrome polish.   You should polish it up like you are ready to take it to a parade.  Better yet, find a kid who needs a little Christmas money and teach them how to put a little elbow grease into it.  Take them for a ride at the end.  They will never forget it.

     Options for selling - 

   Ebay - Your most likely place to sell, but you have to ask more to cover the auction costs.  

   Craigslist - A step down, but more people are using search engines that look at the entire "US market", so Craigslist is not restricted to local markets anymore.  Personally I would start with a post on Craigslist.  

I think your $8K asking price is not too out of line.  You can analyze the price to death.  Most buyers don't.  It is an emotional decision on the buyers side, and it will depend on what they saw for sale recently.  You can always lower the price later, but again, its all about being patient.  The right buyer will come along and negotiate a price as long as the car is advertised. 

By the way, I overpaid for my Buick too.  I knew this, but I couldn't find another car that I liked better, and I was getting tired of looking.  (Patience was running thin on my end).  

Hugh

 

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Nlogsdon like the pictures of the campground I can smell the camp fire and hear the muzzle loaders going off.   I know there a number of things I could do to make the car better looking but at me age 5 cars are just more than I need. I sure enjoyed reading all of everyone's comments. At one time or the other I've been on both sides of the battle so to speak.. Mike.

 

 

 

 

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Nlogsdon,

 

Sometimes you just need to put it in perspective of what is good condition and what you can do. 

 

Here are some pictures of my most recent acquisition and it was a lot more than your top end price.  This is the "car" I went to Reno to pick up.  The proverbial "basket case"

 

Good luck in your search and if you find something you want looked at let us know.  There are lots of us around the country that are more than willing to help.

 

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Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 11/19/2017 at 6:18 PM, Nlogsdon said:

I would love to know just where you guys are finding Buicks like this for $4000... I really want a 7-passenger Buick and I've been looking for one for over a year that I can afford. I'm not a collector. I want something that I can enjoy with my family of 6. I'd be happy with a boring 1929 and I don't mind a wrong taillight or incorrect upholstery. I'm just looking for something that's drive-able as is, doesn't look terrible, and has a good title. (And isn't more than 500 miles from Louisville, KY) I can't find anything! This one was the cheapest I've found, but I can't swing the $8k MikeFit wants for it. I would suspect it's probably worth it from what I've seen. The only things I see in the $4k range look like the mess that Mike6024 posted. 

 

Nlogsdon,

 

Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. While I have owned cars from the 20's I really know more about 30's Buicks now. I can't say that I have a great knowledge of the value of this particular car although I would guess it is somewhere between $6,000 and $9,000. The answer to your question about where the cheaper cars are found is actually very simple. The cheapest way to buy cars is to join an antique automobile club. I am very active in AACA. I am also active in the 36-38 Buick Club. I am a Buick Club of America member, but I am not as active in BCA.

 

When you join a club, you are joining a group that often has insider information on cars for sale and often gives members the first shot at a reduced price. The forum also operates in a similar manner. Last night, I saw an item offered for sale on the forum at a good price,  and was able to buy it. The seller offered it here at a good price before posting it on ebay. If he had posted it on ebay, it would have probably sold for more money than what he sold it to me for. Club members trade cars within the club at good prices because they are dealing with friends and know that the person that they are selling the car to will cherish it and care for it. If you offer a car to someone you don't know, they are not usually going to be offered as good a deal. You will often learn more through informal communication channels within a club than you will through an internet search. 

 

I have been looking for a replacement body for a 1938 Buick Century project. I found it while I was talking with a fellow 36-38 Club member in a different state by phone. He knew of one that had just been put on the market at a good price. I called the owner, and after a short conversation, We came to a deal. I am making a 20 hour round trip to get it soon.

 

Another sort of related, if a bit off topic, story a local (Southeastern North Carolina) AACA Chapter member loves small imported cars which I personally have no interest in. She wanted a particular car. A couple of years ago, I was in Hershey, PA at the AACA Fall Meet. She and her husband were not able to attend Hershey that year. I found the car she wanted. I texted her photos and asked if she was interested. She said that she was. I called her up and let her talk with the seller. They came to a deal. She called another friend who was also at Hershey. The other friend went over and paid for the car in cash. She then called someone else who lived near Hershey that she had met through the club who was able to store the car until she could arrange to pick it up. Another North Carolina AACA friend was planning to deliver a car to a museum in the Hershey area a couple of weeks later. That friend picked up her car after he dropped off his car and brought it back to North Carolina. My friend was able to pick up the car at his house, a couple of hours away from her home after he brought it down from Pennsylvania.  This odd story illustrates how people in this hobby work together to help each other. It may be an extreme example, but I think it demonstrates the value of club membership perfectly.

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On ‎12‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 10:47 AM, sligermachine said:

how far along do u have it now ?  kyle

 

I currently have pieces spread out over about 9 locations in three states.  Looking to hopefully have a running chassis in the summer, maybe more.  I hope?

 

Need to update.  Currently in 5 states, 10 locations.  12/25/17

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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