neil morse

Neil's '41 Super Model 51

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On 11/2/2017 at 6:39 PM, JohnD1956 said:

I don't see where there is any baffle or valve and it would seem to me that just vacuum from running might suck engine oil up that tube and down the carbs. 

 

John commented earlier about the primitive PCV system that Buick used in 1941 with a tube running from the valve cover into the air cleaner.  I neglected to take a photo of the inside of the valve cover when it was off, but there was, in fact, a baffle on the inside to prevent the problem that John was wondering about.

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1 hour ago, neil morse said:

 

John commented earlier about the primitive PCV system that Buick used in 1941 with a tube running from the valve cover into the air cleaner.  I neglected to take a photo of the inside of the valve cover when it was off, but there was, in fact, a baffle on the inside to prevent the problem that John was wondering about.

 

I found it very interesting that the 41 had this system.  Engines prior to, and thereafter, used the road draft tube for ventilation of the fumes.  I do not know if it was all engines but I know my 56 still employs the road draft tube.  I wonder mostly about why the engineers went this way in 41 and dropped back to the road draft tube later? 

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18 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

 

I found it very interesting that the 41 had this system.  Engines prior to, and thereafter, used the road draft tube for ventilation of the fumes.  I do not know if it was all engines but I know my 56 still employs the road draft tube.  I wonder mostly about why the engineers went this way in 41 and dropped back to the road draft tube later? 

 

I don't know any more about it than what was posted earlier in this thread (post #'s 12 and 13).  I have noticed, however, that some engines have the "breather" oil cap and no draft tube, even without the pipe going to the air cleaner.

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If you notice the condition of Neils valve train, the crud isnt what I usually see - it is more "cooked' and flaky. Not sludgy. To me that suggests that the ventilation of the crankcase isnt great. I expect that Buick found the  same thing and went back to the more conventional road draft tube.

We made no attempt to clean the valve train up. I felt that there would be to great a chance of getting a bunch of particles down into the crankase. Let sleepping dogs lay.

 

It was fun for me to have helped Neil.

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Spark Plug Cover

 

I got a spark plug cover off Ebay to spiff up my engine compartment a bit.  After spraying with a rattle can of Dante Red from Cars, Inc., it looks pretty good.  I'm going to wait a while to install it because I want to see if we took care of the problem of oil seeping down onto the plugs.  Also, I need to score a pair of the correct acorn nuts.

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New Tailpipe

 

When I got my car, I saw that the last 8" or so of the tailpipe had rusted through and broken off, and what remained had a "filigree" look to it.  A local muffler shop gave me a bid of $75 to replace the pipe and also patch a small hole in the muffler.  Seemed like a good price, so I took the car down today and waited while the work was done.

 

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I forgot to take a proper "before" photo, but you can get the idea from this one.

 

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Old pipe cut off just behind the rear axle.

 

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New pipe welded on.

 

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Looks much better, and will make for more pleasant conditions in the passenger compartment.

 

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I took some photos of the undercarriage since this is the first time I've had the car on a lift since I got it.  I was pretty happy with how clean it looked.

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 I agree with John that the underside of your car looks great!

 I also have an issue with mine popping out of third on a coast, at times, but not always. I was able to get some bushings back when I restored the car a few years ago, and actually remanufactured part of the steel shaft the you have a picture of above, but there is still one quite loose bushing near the transmission. I have been thinking that maybe the culprit.

 Also, I was very interested in the comments about the origin of the oil in the spark plug pockets. I too have that issue, and wondered where its' coming from. Thanks, I'll give that fix a try.

 Keith

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3 hours ago, avgwarhawk said:

Did the repair kit for the clutch linkage solve the popping out of gear when decelerating?    

 

Just a tiny correction -- the repair kit was for the shift linkage, not the clutch.  I don't yet know the answer to your question.  I haven't experienced the "pop out" since we installed the new bushings in the linkage, but it's only something that happened occasionally, so I can't say for sure.

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2 hours ago, Buicknutty said:

 I agree with John that the underside of your car looks great!

 I also have an issue with mine popping out of third on a coast, at times, but not always. I was able to get some bushings back when I restored the car a few years ago, and actually remanufactured part of the steel shaft the you have a picture of above, but there is still one quite loose bushing near the transmission. I have been thinking that maybe the culprit.

 Also, I was very interested in the comments about the origin of the oil in the spark plug pockets. I too have that issue, and wondered where its' coming from. Thanks, I'll give that fix a try.

 Keith

 

In the repair kit from Bob's, the replacement for the bushing down near the transmission is actually nylon, which I'm sure is superior to what was there originally.  On my car, there was nothing left of what had been there before, so I don't know what it was made of.  It's the white part in the group that I have circled in this photo.

 

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Since the kit from Bob's is only $29.95, you might want to try it.  As I mentioned above, I haven't yet determined whether the linkage repair took care of the "pop out" problem, but it sure made the shifting feel smoother and more positive

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It seems like we successfully took care of the problem with oil seeping down into the spark plug cavities, so I went ahead and installed the spark plug cover.  Cleans things up nicely, but I still need to find the correct acorn nuts.

 

 

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They actually are not the same size, at least on the 248 c.i. engine.  The spark plug cover nuts are smaller.

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Neil, perhaps they changed by 1950. They are the same on mine. I t was a one owner car. It is a Special with a 248. I suppose it is possible they were changed some time before it was retired in '71.   Is it the thread that is different or the external size?

 

  Ben

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14 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

Neil, perhaps they changed by 1950. They are the same on mine. I t was a one owner car. It is a Special with a 248. I suppose it is possible they were changed some time before it was retired in '71.   Is it the thread that is different or the external size?

 

  Ben

 

Ben, you are 100% correct.  I was not paying attention, and was going by the external dimension of the acorn nut.  Since the nuts for the spark plug cover took a 1/2 inch socket and the acorn nuts for the valve cover took a 5/8 inch socket, I mistakenly assumed that the studs for the spark plug cover were smaller.  Not so.  The studs are identical, 5/16-24 as Don mentions.  Thank you for setting me straight.  I will get a set of the acorns from Bob's.

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NOS Ammeter Gauge

 

One of the things that really needs attention in my car is the ammeter/temp. gauge.

 

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I found this NOS Ammeter on Ebay, and it arrived today.  It's a little dusty from being on the shelf for so long, but it's going to clean up nice.

 

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Thanks, Keith.  Temp. gauge on the way as well, from a different seller.  I'm hoping that it will be as clean as this one.

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NOS Temperature gauge -- DOA

 

I got a new temp. gauge off of Ebay.  It looks good and appears never to have been installed in a car, but unfortunately sticking the bulb in a cup of boiling water produces no movement of the needle.  The bulb and capillary tube appear to be completely intact, so I don't know where the problem is.  The needle also moves freely when I tweak the mechanism from the back, so that's not the problem.  However, the "magic gas" appears to have leaked out somewhere along the way.

 

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I have been trying to decide how to proceed with this aspect of my gauge repair project.  The temperature gauge currently in the car works fine -- it's just a cosmetic issue from the fried plastic, as you can see from the photo I posted earlier.  In Dave Stovall's excellent thread about how he restored his gauges, he describes how he left his temperature gauge in place and hanging out of the dash and essentially rebuilt the gauge face around it.  There is certainly a lot to be said for this approach since it is very risky to try to remove the bulb from the block without breaking the tube, and "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."  On the other hand, I figured if I could get a new unit that functioned it might be more convenient to remove the old unit and rebuild the gauge cluster on the bench.

 

I have read that there are places that will fix these units and put new ether in the bulb (certainly not something I would want to attempt).  If it's not too costly, I'm thinking it might be worth having this new unit repaired.  Ideas? 

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I would have the "new" one repaired.    An observation:   the bolt in the last rocker arm pedestal is sometimes [  all the time?  ]too long and is screwed into the bulb. Removing said bolt will eliminate this possibility.  Allows for injection of penentrant as well.

 

  Ben

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The capillary tubes are often filled with a liquid or gas that expands with temperature. Maybe someone knows if these are repairable.

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