47windsor

1947 Chrysler shocks & springs

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I am noticing the back end of my 47 Coupe is lower than the front end & doesn't do very well on any road bumps.  I gather from my own description that it would be more likely the springs.  Beside of the options of replacing the springs, is there any other options to increase the life or bring the level & performance of the springs to a more comfortable ride??

 

Regards

 

Bruce Watson

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There used to be spring shops all over the country that did this kind of work. Now most cars have coil springs, not many cars have leaf springs anymore. But the shops  are still around, servicing big trucks.

 

So find a good spring shop. They can rearch your old springs and add a leaf for extra support, and install new sliders and bushings as necessary. When they get done the back of your car will sit up high and ride the way it should. Have them put on a new set of quality shock absorbers while they are at it.

 

And get a set for the front too. The icing on the cake would be to get a front end alignment and wheels balanced. Believe me, you will feel like you are driving a new car.

 

Rearching springs and fitting new sliders and bushings, $200 - $300.

 

Shocks from Andy Bernbaum $185 a set of 4.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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Air shocks will lift it back up.  I once had a 40 Plymouth that sagged about 2" at the left rear.  I installed 1 air chock on that side and pumped it back up to level.  

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I had a local machine shop re-arch some early Ford Mustang rear springs (notorious saggers). The only instructions I gave was to arch them 2" over stock and they worked perfectly and gave an almost imperceptible rake.

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Rusty's answer is the best option. But if you are on a tight budget like some of us many times are - and have access to a parts car with the same or very similar springs - you can add an extra leaf and it will cost you just your time and sweat. The process below is one that I've used one a number of different older cars with good success, although not an earlier Chrysler product. Hopefully the Mopar experts will speak up if there are reasons this won't work on yours. 

 

Use the main leafs from the parts car springs, and cut off the eyes and about one inch of spring on each end. Basically you want the extra leaf to end up about an inch shy of the edge of the eye in the main leaf. The best thing to cut the leaves with is a abrasive cut off wheel, just go slow so you don't get the metal too hot. Slightly round the ends, and slightly taper the "bottom" of the new leaves (where they will ride against the main leaf) about 1-1/2" so the ends don't dig into the main leaf. 

 

One caution is to verify that the added leaf is the same thickness as the existing main leaf. Hopefully you will have enough extra threads on the u-bolts that you can reuse them. If not, just about any place that does front end/spring work on larger trucks should be able to make you some with some extra length. 

 

The car will ride stiffer with the extra leaf, but should also get the rear up. Finish it off with some new shocks and you may be very surprised at the improvement in the car's roadability. 

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Thanks to everyone that responded, I will look into the information that Rusty suggested I think that is the way to go.

 

Much appreciated

 

Bruce

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If your are on a really tight budget you can re-arch your leaves yourself.  A piece of rail (as in railroad track) on its side and a sledge hammer with a head like the photo.  Easy a pie.

1.jpg

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Ha ha leaf springs are one of the hardest things to work on, on a car. You can rearch your springs yourself, clean paint and install new bushings and sliders, but once you do a set you will never do another no matter how much the spring shops charge.

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I disagree Rusty, at least to re-arching.  I have done 15 or 20 springs (Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Ford and one Studebaker) that is the re-arching.  Only on my Pontiac did I R&R the springs.  All the rest the owners removed, disassembled, reassembled and reinstalled the springs.  I always felt that the R&R disassembly, cleaning, painting, and especially bushings were the hard part.

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I thought, that's what I said. If you rearched the springs by hand with a big hammer and railroad iron you must have arms like the Hulk.

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