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Tires for 1918 Buick 7 passenger touring


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Have a 1918 Buick E 49 takes tire size 34 x 4.5

 

The rim is 25 inch wood spoke.

 

Anybody else make them besides Coker? They want $400 each for black, $600 for white, and don't even offer black with white walls like my car already has.

 

Checked Diamond Back and don't see them there.

DSCN1400.JPG

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Looks like this early system of tire size nomenclature was the first one, and lasted from the earliest days of automobiles until 1924:

 

outside diameter of tire   X   tire width

 

In 1925 the second system of tire size was devised which lasted for decades thereafter:

 

tire width    X   rim diameter

 

This chart shows it  http://www.carnut.com/specs/gen/buick20.html

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6 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:

outside diameter of tire   X   tire width

Well, it's not really tire "width" as in width of the rim, it's the distance from the rim to the tread, maybe we'd call it height.

 

Thus your 34 x 4.5 has two "heights" of tire, each 4.5 inches, so 9 inches total.  Subtract the 9 inches from the 34 inches to give the rims size, which is 25 inches.

 

I've never heard that the second number is ALSO the rim width, but that would be interesting if true....

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Thanks that makes sense, because in the 20s parts catalogue I have, there are tire ads, around the time they came out with "full balloon" tires, and they are telling people to switch to full balloon numbers and calling them "oversized tires" because the size they recommend for balloon is bigger in BOTH measurements than the older non-balloon tires on the same car.

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A lot of early cars used 30x3.5 tires, thus a 23 inch rim.  To your comment on oversized tires, the 1910 Hudson I owned had 31x4 tires on it, same rim size but an oversized tire with a heavier load rating...

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Our 1912 Oakland used 34x4-1/2, and were replaced by 35x5" which fit on the same size rim (35-5-5=25")

our 1914 Buick B-37, as well as our 1915 Hudson SIX-40 both came with 34x4 with a 26" rim, and could upgrade to a 35x4-1/2, or a 36x5

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This shows one of the ads from the mid-20's about the new oversized balloon tires. Instead of 29 x 4.4 old-style "high pressure" fiber tires (on 20 inch rims), they would sell you 32 x 6.2 "full balloon" tires on the same rims, but instead of 60 pounds pressure you only needed 35. Much softer ride. This ad only lists the smallest tires to keep the prices low for the ad. Much higher prices for bigger rims I'm sure.

balloon.jpg

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Interesting that if you play around with tire size you can do the same thing as changing the rear axle ratio. Oversize tires as in the above example you can have 29 inch tires or 32, that would make a difference. It's not like a 1918 Buick is going highway speed.

 

When I go to Coker I'm getting 35 x 5 instead of 34 x 4.5 or 33 x 4. They sell all 3 sizes in the Firestone Non-skid and the price is not much different.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think Universal Tire is owned by Coker. I just ordered stuff from each, and the invoices and return emails look identical, in ways that cannot be coincidental. Plus, Universal is selling Firestones at the same price as Coker.

 

What's the story?

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  • 2 years later...

Too bad you can't get oversize "balloon" tires on 25 inch rims. It would be something like 36 x 5.5 or 37 x 6.  Can you imagine a 37 inch wheel?

 

I would need to get smaller rims to get balloon tires. Then my 1917 would look like a 1929 car.

 

Just gonna stick to the book size tires.

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