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A way to verify that a car won an award at the Hershey Fall Meet in 1964


Blueabbott
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Contact AACA Headquarters and they can try to research it for you.  Is here an AACA prize winner oval badge on it?  You will  probably need the name of the owner at that time too.  My 1914 T won a National First in 1965.

Terry

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I tried to verify my 1930 Packard with HQ a some months ago via e mail and got no response. I have the 1982 first place award badge on the car, know who owned it at the time it won the award and where he lived but do not know what AACA meet it was at when it won the award. Good luck.

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There was once upon a time an annual book produced at Hershey and sent to members free.  Then it was available for $4 or $8 or something like that.  I don't know if it is available at all now.  It listed all winners back to the early 1950s.  I always thought having your name and car published in that book made winning in AACA so much more valuable than some big trophy at the local shopping center meet.  Everyone could see your accomplishment for all time in that book.  I was always opposed to it not being printed, but money is king and always has to win out to keep things going.

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Walt, our staff prides itself on answering every email, letter and phone call.  Doing research with at least some details is very easy for us.  There were 3 1930 Packard's that won an award in 1982 so we would need more information.  I suggest following up with a call to this office and ask for Rick or myself.  Where your email went I have no idea but feel pretty strong that it did not get into the right hands.

 

1964 Hershey had several Model T winners.  We need to know a year and any other info to properly research this but for the most part maybe be able to do this in just a few minutes.

 

Earl, we produce only a few books now as the yearly publication of the winner list went unsold.

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9 hours ago, Walt G said:

I tried to verify my 1930 Packard with HQ a some months ago via e mail and got no response. I have the 1982 first place award badge on the car, know who owned it at the time it won the award and where he lived but do not know what AACA meet it was at when it won the award. Good luck.

Walt, there were five award winning Packards in 1982. If you identify which owner had yours I can track down the meet where the award was won.

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Thanks you so much, your contact/list  has verified the car i now own was a Senior  (I think , there is a S after the listing on the list you provided) award winner at Hershey in 1982.

It seems after that is was not really used or shown much at all since it took all its awards and stored until I bought it in 2016. The car looks like it was finished last week.

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Steve, thanks for your quick response!  My 1925 Ford Model T was owned by John Mahon at the time that it was shown in 1964.  Apparently it had won some type of award, as the owner's son has indicated that he had something from the Ford Motor Company that his father had received when the car was shown at Hershey.   I do not know if the vehicle won an AACA award, or some type of special award.

 

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14 hours ago, Steve Moskowitz said:

we produce only a few books now as the yearly publication of the winner list went unsold.


We could look into doing a print on demand book for order. Would keep the club from burning money on unsold books and make available several types of products that otherwise would be cost prohibitive, such as a winners book!

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Folks,

The S indicated the car had won a Senior.  If there was an S2 that indicated it had progressed on to Preservation.  I am wondering, in this day and time, with all of the computer capability if the last book couldn't be digitized in the Library, as they did the past magazines, and updated at the end of each year.  And then, upon demand, for a price, if it couldn't then be delivered to a member upon request in disk or stick form.  Then the member could have access on his or her home computer all the way back to 1953.  This would solve the cost involved, make a little money for the Library, and satisfy the members that are interested.  It could even be advertised that it was available in this manner.  That would ease the load on the staff responding on a case by case basis, and return the "class" of the historical aspect back to the awards system.  That seems reasonably simple to me, but I'm no computer genius.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Blueabott, thanks for the challenge. Mr. Mahon's data is not in the computer system.  However, in looking at the book there was only one 1925 T that won an award and it was owned by Lule Hemming and shown in Topeka in 1964.  I am going to have to do some serious digging to try and get an answer. An old time might now if Ford gave out awards but we did not have our national Ford award to years later.  We will search more this afternoon but something does not add up.  Mr. Bob Mahon does show up in the 1964 Roster. 

 

Earl, there has not been an S2 in awhile,  it goes S, P and if there were multiple Preservations it would go P2 of course then to GN etc

 

Interesting idea about the print on demand but it goes to a bigger issue that that, what amounts to weeks of work to get the data entered correctly for the printer.  The other issue is we did this wonderful project of digitizing all our magazines and offered it for $99 and sales have been shockingly low for such a great product.  Anyway, we will surely look into your thoughts. 

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Another thought is to make it available on your web site for members only.  While you would still have to do the work of data entry, you would not have to make it point ready.

Make it so it is searchable by year, make or award and it is much more user friendly then a paper book.

 

Also once it is entered, you could turn it in to a PDF that could be mailed to someone.

 

 

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Thanks Bill, we will certainly consider it.

 

Blue, I am sorry to say we have run up against the proverbial stone wall on this one.  We cannot match the name up with any Hershey awards from 1964 so far.  We have tried our magazines, computer data and the winner's book and it is not coming through. 

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The other possible issue is if the Badges were lost, or removed and not passed on with the Car to new owners can the new owner re enter Meets and start the process over by gong for 1st Junior?  This opens the door for a new owner to continued the preservation of the car and enjoy the results if successful. On the down side it could devalue the car temporarily by not acknowledging it's passed success. However if the car re enters the Show field and achieves current  success, it might increase it's value above what it is valued at from success achieved years ago?

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There was a time when if a Senior winner was sold, the new owner was supposed to send the plaque into Hershey.  So, many are lost, but the book verified the fact.  They/we changed that during the time I was on the Board, but that 's only in the last 15-20 years.  I don't remember when that change was made, but it was changed I think, because so many new owners ignored it.  My '41 Buick Limited won in 1976 and Seniored in 1978.   Sometime ago, I saw a picture of the car on Google, and it still had the Senior plate on it.  Steve Moskowitz: I wasn't thinking of printing anything but a disk or stick.  The digitizing would take some time, yes, but it would be valuable time spent by Library personnel.  I realize that during the time of getting into the new facility they won't have any time.  But the time will come when they find some coasting time.  The historical value of cataloging a car's great accomplishment (or an owner's) is an important value offered to members, even if many aren't smart enough to know it.  It verifies an accomplishment by  a member few achieve or ever have achieved in the big scheme of things.  A car won't stay a Senior over time, and the owner who got it there won't be able to do it again of the long time of life.  But, thinking restorers should find value in looking back on that great accomplishment as they age, and the car ages.  I know I do.  It makes me want to keep the '39 Buick sedan with sidemounts as good as I can after 45 years.  I can say she was the best once long ago and I got her there.  Sentimental?  Yeah, I know.  People wear jeans to church and funerals nowadays.  I remember when no Director of AACA would be seen at Philadelphia without a coat and tie.  Distinguished.  That really impressed me when I was 24  years old going to Philadelphia while my father insisted only junkmen fooled with old cars.

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Thanks so much, Steve.  I have located the oldest son of the restorer of my Model T and I will try to get more information as to the award that he has mentioned.  He claims that he has some type of award from the Ford Motor Company, but has not yet located it in his parent's belongings.  Thanks again for your time!

Dean Zwicker

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