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trimacar

Packard "speedster" on Hershey show field

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I'm curious, there was a modified Packard on the show field, lots of graphics including the word "Speedster" on the side. 

 

I didn't think modified cars were supposed to be on show field?  Or is this a verified race car of the period?

 

It lived in the Green field during the week, so I heard it start a few times, quite a distinctive exhaust note!

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The one that was in the green field had no graphics on it.  I saw a picture of the one on the show field and at first thought it was the same one, then noticed the graphics.  Unless they were magnetic decals??

It sure did sound nice coming past our space every day!

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Oh, I thought it was the same car!  The one we heard must have had a hot cam in it, it probably ran like the dickens, but it's idle was uneasy!

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That's the one on the Green Field!  Different one on show field I guess....but still curious about how it's classified and how it's shown, is it factory?

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David, the speedster in the show of course is not factory nor is there a class for it in AACA.  However, these things happen as registration people many times have no way of knowing that the car was done up as a race car, etc.  The owner who always brings at least two Packards to the show was not concerned about awards but wanted to let people see his car as it has appeared on Chasing Class Car in a grudge match with Wayne Carini.  No real harm done as it is a fun car for everyone to see and this has happened in other years.  The owner is a super supporter of AACA and was not trying to cause any problems. 

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The car that was on the green field is the restored result of the actual body of the 1928-29 Packard Speedster prototype, fitted to a re-creation chassis. If I remember correctly, the body was found in Iowa many years ago, mounted to a Bugatti chassis. It's a great car, now located in the Packard museum in Dayton, Ohio. Too bad it wasn't on the showfield, too, as there were two authentic 1930 Speedsters shown in class 19a.

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1 hour ago, West Peterson said:

The car that was on the green field is the restored result of the actual body of the 1928-29 Packard Speedster prototype, fitted to a re-creation chassis. If I remember correctly, the body was found in Iowa many years ago, mounted to a Bugatti chassis. It's a great car, now located in the Packard museum in Dayton, Ohio. Too bad it wasn't on the showfield, too, as there were two authentic 1930 Speedsters shown in class 19a.

I kinda liked the red one!

 

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Thanks for the explanation.  I wasn't trying to say any harm was done, and I know who had it on the show field and that they do a lot for the hobby.  I was just curious.  I appreciate the owners sharing it with the crowd....

 

I understand, too, that some things "sneak" in to a show.  I took my unrestored 1937 Cord phaeton to the ACD show in Auburn, not knowing that there was a special place for unrestored cars.  There I sat, in a row of restored cars, and numerous owners asked me why I was there, and told me that I didn't belong on that row......I pled ignorance, although I did note that people would walk by a few restored cars to look at mine!  It was much more fun than sitting way in the back of the show!......

ACD meet 2011 pic 1.jpg

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But, I now understand that the "speedster" on the show field got a first Junior?  How can that be?

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On 10/15/2017 at 9:52 PM, trimacar said:

But, I now understand that the "speedster" on the show field got a first Junior?  How can that be?

You read the show results incorrectly. There were three Packard Speedsters on the showfield, and you've identified the wrong one. One received a Senior Preservation Award (mine), one received a First Junior (Marano's), and one received a Third Junior (also Marano's). The second Marano car was a 1929, the other two were 1930s.

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As a side-note....I read somewhere that there are many more open Cadillac V-16's and Packard V-12's  then there were when the cars were new.

 

And that is understandable,  given what some people want and need from the old car hobby.   At car shows,   few pay any attention to my dark-colored and sedate looking formal sedan......but watch the smiles on the owner's faces of the brightly colored  open cars when they see how much the crowd appreciates them...

 

Each to his own...I recall when exhibiting my  sedate, dark blue Rolls Phantom I "Pickadilly"  ,  a much "prettier" Phantom 1 was parked alongside.  The judges asked the owner to start the car.  He got a sudden, surprised look on his face....said he'd have to get his staff to do that...hadn't a CLUE how to start the thing...he meant no harm..just couldn't understand why anyone would know or care if it actually ran!

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1 hour ago, SaddleRider said:

As a side-note....I read somewhere that there are many more open Cadillac V-16's and Packard V-12's  then there were when the cars were new.

 

And that is understandable,  given what some people want and need from the old car hobby.   At car shows,   few pay any attention to my dark-colored and sedate looking formal sedan......but watch the smiles on the owner's faces of the brightly colored  open cars when they see how much the crowd appreciates them...

 

Each to his own...I recall when exhibiting my  sedate, dark blue Rolls Phantom I "Pickadilly"  ,  a much "prettier" Phantom 1 was parked alongside.  The judges asked the owner to start the car.  He got a sudden, surprised look on his face....said he'd have to get his staff to do that...hadn't a CLUE how to start the thing...he meant no harm..just couldn't understand why anyone would know or care if it actually ran!

Can't get much prettier than a Picadilly.

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2 hours ago, West Peterson said:

You read the show results incorrectly. There were three Packard Speedsters on the showfield, and you've identified the wrong one. One received a Senior Preservation Award (mine), one received a First Junior (Marano's), and one received a Third Junior (also Marano's). The second Marano car was a 1929, the other two were 1930s.

Thanks for clarification.  Which one, if any, is the one that had "SPEEDSTER" in big letters across the side?  Is that a factory race car, or factory body style?  Is it one of the ones that won an award?

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The one with the wild lettering was Marano's 1929 626 Speedster. It's a look-a-like car to the actual prototype built in 1928-29. I don't think it was done to exact specifications, neither in the body nor the chassis/running gear. And I'm pretty sure the real car never got that lettering all over it. The real car was actually in the Green Field in the Packard Museum tent.

 

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32 minutes ago, West Peterson said:

The one with the wild lettering was Marano's 1929 626 Speedster. It's a look-a-like car to the actual prototype built in 1928-29. I don't think it was done to exact specifications, neither in the body nor the chassis/running gear. And I'm pretty sure the real car never got that lettering all over it. The real car was actually in the Green Field in the Packard Museum tent.

 

It appears as though this Is the 1929 Packard 626 belonging to Ralph Marano listed in class 19A as having won a 3rd Junior. 

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28 minutes ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

It appears as though this Is the 1929 Packard 626 belonging to Ralph Marano listed in class 19A as having won a 3rd Junior. 

Yes. Read post #12.

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Here are pictures that I took of the speedster at the Saturday show and the Dayton Packard Museum speedster that I took on the Green Field on Thursday.

 

BTW I also attached a couple of pictures of a 1916 Speedster that I took at the Gilmore Museum in Michigan a couple of years ago.

 

Bob

Hershey17_AACA_Speedster_1.jpg

Hershey17_AACA_Speedster_2.jpg

Hershey17_AACA_Speedster_3.jpg

Packard_Museum_Speedster_1.jpg

Packard_Museum_Speedster_2.5.jpg

Packard_Museum_Speedster_2.jpg

Packard_Museum_Speedster_3.jpg

Gilmore_Speedster_1.jpg

Gilmore_Speedster_2.jpg

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The Packard Museum's Speedster was beautiful and a treat to see parked right in front at the Hershey Hotel Friday evening. Was a nice treat as we went out for a walk after dinner.

IMG_8978.JPG

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That Cord picture got me to scan this one picture I took on the way to a Fort Erie cruise night years ago. It was dark on the way back and when we returned to the owner's home I told him there was a light shining under his car. To which he replied "Oh! That headlight must be working again!"

002.thumb.jpg.e0d1a61dfc9dfc174e29805f224fcd8c.jpg

 

Good memories. I left his house and drove toward home along the Niagara Parkway. It was a warm summer night and the mist at the Falls coated my car with droplets. I thought, what a great way to mess up a wash and wax, a warm summer night in a foreign country driving home from a cruise night through the mist of Niagara Falls.

 

Thanks, Rick. And I loved that car.

Bernie

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That's a great story on the Cord!  You can turn the lights on without cranking them into the upright position.

 

When I first got my Cord in the mid 1980's, there were three things not correct on the car.  Wrong carb and fuel pump, a problem solved with a  call to Stan in Wellington Kansas and a reasonable check sent to him.

 

The third problem, someone had converted the car to seal beams.  So, for 15 or more years I looked for original headlight buckets, lenses, reflectors.....and they were few and far between, and I always missed getting them.  Then, a really nice set of complete assemblies showed up on Ebay.  Darned if I was going to let them go, so bid some outrageous number, and came away with them for $800 for the pair.  Sounds expensive, but I don't think one could find them now for that......and my car is now correct, albeit with flaking paint and worn upholstery!

 

Lots of slogans and stuff on that SPEEDSTER, a friend has a Stoddard Dayton speed car that he has in race car livery, and he used a special paint that is easily removed....wonder how much of that is special paint or plastic transfers or other removable stuff....still don't understand where it fits in the AACA judging guidelines, and it getting an award makes me think of the "good ole boy" judging I've seen at some local,  informal meets...thought the AACA was above that....

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I believe the car in the Green Field that the Packard Museum owns was restored in Dowagiac, Michigan by the late Dale Lyons and A.J. Balfour.

A great amount of research was done to make that car as authentic as possible to the car we see in period publications that Packard had made.

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On ‎10‎/‎13‎/‎2017 at 11:17 AM, Steve Moskowitz said:

David, the speedster in the show of course is not factory nor is there a class for it in AACA.  However, these things happen as registration people many times have no way of knowing that the car was done up as a race car, etc.  The owner who always brings at least two Packards to the show was not concerned about awards but wanted to let people see his car as it has appeared on Chasing Class Car in a grudge match with Wayne Carini.  No real harm done as it is a fun car for everyone to see and this has happened in other years.  The owner is a super supporter of AACA and was not trying to cause any problems. 

It would seem that the lions share of presenting an authentic car for judging at an AACA National Meet is the responsibility of the car owner, not the ones processing the registration.

When submitting registration for a National Meet just above where the car owner signs it reads:

 

"I also acknowledge in signing this registration form that the body and engine are authentic and of the same style as that originally fitted to this chassis at the time of the vehicle's original manufacture, as required by official judging rules."

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