alsfarms

Speedster Builds.............

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Nice start!  My brother built a "T" speedster similar to your car.  When he first built it he didn't put a back slope to the seats.  After driving it for a while he didn't like that arrangement at all.  He redid the body and put some back leaning slope to the seats which tended to "keep you in the seat" not so prone to slide out.  Are you going to run any aux. transmission or high speed gears in the rear end?  Your choice of a late  series Model T is a good one to get you all the brake you can get.  Is your engine also a '26-'27?  Share more pictures as you proceed.

Al

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The engine is a '27 so yes it does have the holes for the tranny.  Internally I will remove the mag and drop a bug oil pump onto the back of a cut down A cam.  I still need to put a T nose on the cam, I have a "box" of distributor stuff and hope to make one work with a mechanical advance (manual as well for 12V starting) that I can drop a pertronix kit in and employ a newer cap and rotor.  The oil pump will deliver into the top of the bearings with a bypass to the cam gears thru a drilled out bolt.  If you noticed I already put in an aluminum warford I still need to do the radius rods.  I may use the zenith or I have a Winfield "M" (B size) that I should be able to make work.  The radiator is whippet and headlights Auburn. 

 

This "car" started out as the discard from someone making a hotrod, they took most everything body wise including the frame and replaced the frame with 2x4's leaving most everything mechanical.  My original intention was to use the parts to get my early car running sooner replacing them as I got the correct early parts rebuilt. Things have been delayed here as we had that nasty hurricane not too long ago and got flooded.  Long story short I saw it as too complete and decided to build a speedster, now to get a title. . .

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You do indeed have the start of a very nice speedster.  Do not give up and stall on this one!

Al

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Have you ever wondered about early technology in our antique automobiles?  I sure have!  One item that is interesting to consider is the evolution of the principle of delivering gasoline to the carburetor.  Early on, gravity was used. However, that delivery method of using gravity meant that the gasoline tank would have to be high enough above the carburetor that it would flow even when the automobile would be climbing a hill.  The Model T Ford, even with the tank up under the seat, would struggle at times climbing hills back in the day.  The solution was to get in reverse and go up the hill backwards.  That method is certainly a practical means but not a realistic solution to getting up the hill.  The next idea was to pressurize the fuel system in order to push the fuel to the carburetor.  Later, came the vacuum tank system.  Then the mechanical fuel pump and now lastly, we are at the electric pump.  I am going to post a few pictures of a set up that I have put together in order to run my automobile on the early pressurized fuel tank design.  If you have experience setting up and running your automobile on this pressurized fuel tank system please share your "DO's" and "Don't's".  The pressure system is made up of a hand pump, as operated by the driver, to build pressure in the tank in order to push gasoline to the carburetor to initially start the car.  You register the pressure on a dash mounted pressure gauge and should build the pressure to a max. of two pounds.  Then once the car is started, the regulator valve comes into play.  This unit pulls pressure from the running engine and also has a cooling circuit that is sourced from flowing water from the radiator cooling system of the engine.  This unit then admits 2 pounds of regulated pressure into the a sealed  gasoline tank which in turn will push the gasoline up to the carburetor.  This system is actually a very workable design and with no working wear parts.  Your thoughts and comments are welcome.

Al

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