Jump to content

Antique car owners


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Has there ever been a poll on how many antique car owners actually do the work on their own vehicles? Or have actually restored the vehicles they own. smirk.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have seen some owner restored cars and sometimes you are much better off letting the pro's do the work. I have done body work for 25 years and would not dream of letting anyone else do work on my car, antique or not. If you don't do the work yourself, remember, you get what you pay for....sometimes. Find a good shop and then ask people who have had work done by them and ask to see the car they did. If you can do better, DO IT!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

PackardV8.

If u can afford to pay someone else to do the resto work then why bother with a resto????? Just go buy one already restored. I do ALL of my own work. Some of my body work does not turn out like i want it to but its good for a driver at least. The only work i do NOT do is a few special machining operations such as cylinder boring and valve grinding if thay wont hand lap. With the kind of service i've been running into from 'automotive machine shops' i'm a little more than passively in the market for equipment to bore and grind valve seats.

Might even give up restoration completely for a few years if it gets any worse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This being my first "restoration", I was determined to do everything myself. This first one was really easy though so it doesn't represent the effort and skill shown in some of the vehicles I've seen that have been done by the owner. My first was basically a rolling chassis that had been started before and abandoned for some reason. I opted for a 'Huckster' style body because I wanted to get it on the road ASAP (2 years) and drive it around to show it off. As I look back on what I've accomplished so far and all the hours of great conversation it's generated, I wouldn't have done it any different. the next one will probably be a different story though. wink.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aside from chrome plating, engine millwork (not assembly) and doing the interiors, my father and I do all of the work ourselves. We have our own shop (not for hire) that we do everything in. I highly doubt there is anyone who has the facilities of doing a complete restoration in house. If they do, you're talking about several thousand dollars spend in equipment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

while a restoration can be fun and rewarding, i prefer to buy em already done or not in need of restoration. the restoration route seems to be more expensive than getting one already finished. smile.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on the price you pay for the vehicle and the shape of the vehicle. Sometimes you can pay some awfull prices for junk, but if you do the restoration yourself you know exactly what you've got when you're done.

In one case, I bought a '66 mustang from my cousin for $2,000 that had new paint, and a new interior. The first mistake is that I bought it from a relative, the second mistake was that I bought it by looking at a picture. When I got the car home, the paint job was very poor quality and not the correct color, the workmanship of the interior was poor, and there were some sizable bondo patches in the rear quarter panels. At that same time I could have had a 64-1/2 mustang for $600, but thought by spending $2,000 for a car with new paint and interior was a better way to go. For what it would've cost me to get the '66 "right" I could've had the 64-1/2 done for less money and had a car worth more money. To the average person my '66 was a nice car, but for my standards, it wasn't. In simpler terms, if you don't know what you're buying, you can get burned very easily where you can restore something, have it done right, and be farther ahead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...