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1927 Caddy Victoria??


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A huge project, and I think the estimate to have a professional shop like Restorer 32 has to do it as he quotes in realistic.

I would love to see this car saved and restored. you will never get the cost of your time and $ you will have to spend for parts, materials etc back if you sell

it, but as someone stated a lot of do this for the love of the car, know we are preserving something for future generations to see long after we are dust.

Once done, the first time you drive it down the road that feeling of euphoria at what you have and what you have done will make it all worth while.

Go for it!

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WALT G.

I am a car guy; just like all of us here. but something is different with this car, completely consuming me. I have watched numerous videos and documentary's on Cadillac since looking at this car and the history is terrific. I just want to do this car, and make it drivable. all body panels are solid except for lower running boards all the wood needs to me redone but with some time and patience I think it is doable. just cant see letting this car get any worse, consider I have never seen another 20s or 30s caddy driving. granted I live in Maine so the population of car people is lower then larger states. also putting in perspective the snow and winters being as harsh as they are is unbelievable to even fine one of these cars somewhat intact.

I will need help from everyone on here, and beyond but if I get it I will post timeline pics of the resto. also car is completely un molested and is matching numbers. did I also mention clutch pedal moves free as does the brake and steering.    

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wasn't the Victoria only built in in the small wheel base? also guys where would I find parts for car trinket stuff. but what about carburetor? does anyone know how many Victoria's were built in 1927. I know 8599 Cadillac's were built.

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Is infatuation getting in the way of reality? I don't know you or your circumstances, but you have to ask yourself a bunch of questions regarding the restoration of this car. Do I have deep pockets? I mean really deep. This is no a job for the faint of heart. You may be thinking that you will do much of the work yourself. Do I have a fully equipped shop? Are my fabrication skills equal to the job at hand? Am I a woodworker? Not just a guy with a Skilsaw and a claw hammer. The wood in these old cars is a fiendishly complex puzzle. Can I weld? Not just stick two pieces of metal together, but form and join together multiple pieces into a usable part that is identical to the original. Minutia, like how many were built or the missing carburetor, will sort themselves out. As you get seriously involved in the restoration, parts and knowledge will appear as you network with other owners.

I just hate to see anyone get in over their head. Far to many of these love affairs end in an ugly split with the car shoved out behind the house under the ubiquitous blue tarp, further disassembled and with missing or damaged parts

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12 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

"Beware the Philistine. He knows the price of everything but the value of nothing". It's not always about the money.

Since you didn't use the quote feature, I can't be sure if this is directed towards me. I am hardly a Philistine. The deep pockets comment was a fact. It should not deter anyone from entering into a project like this, just serve as a warning that 4 or 5 thousand bucks ain't gonna cut it. You'll be into a basic short block for more than. I have made money on very few projects. My Austin Healey was one, since I got the car, running and driving, for free and was working at a dealership and was able to get many NOS parts at cost. Other than that I have lost my butt on everything else. My current OT project is worth less than half of what I have spent on it. I don't really care. I'm having fun. For a hobbyist, it is never about the money, or at least it shouldn't be. The easiest way to become a millionaire, working on old cars, is to start with two million

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No, it wasn't directed at you. If this site were about golf or big game hunting and a newbie came in the door no one would try to discourage him or her from taking up the sport because "you will quickly be upside down".  None of the original poster's questions were about money yet we instantly go there almost every time someone considers restoring a car. Truth be told virtually 100% of antique cars are money pits and always will be. Do boat clubs try to scare off potential new boat owners? Why do we seem to think it is our civic duty to try to scare off potential new hobbyists? We have a shop full of work, always have had, and I can tell you very few cars that have gone thru our shop could be sold for more than what the owner has spent. People like cars for various reasons, profit potential is way down on that list of reasons. Years ago we did a complete frame up restoration of an extremely rusty '37 Ford 60 HP 4 door sedan. We're talking door hinges rusted thru rusty.The owner knew the car was not worth much but he loved that car and enjoyed it as much as any Duesy owner enjoys his. Stepping off my soap box now. Thank you for your attention.;

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Cadillac Carl could tell you about the carb. But the manual seems to refer to the 314 engine with the 314 carb, and the LaSalle carb is similar but different. So I guess all that tells you is that a LaSalle carb is not interchangeable.

 

Carburetor (non-LaSalle)—Cadillac design and manufacture. Uniform
distribution with maximum efficiency and
economy. Carburetor enriching control on dash to
facilitate starting. Intake manifold exhaust heated.
One adjustment. Automatic thermostatic control for
compensation of changes in atmosphere and engine
temperatures. Large accessible strainer at carburetor.
Carburetor overflow drained to ground.

 

Carburetor (LaSalle)

 

1759. Description
The carburetor is essentially the same as the
314 carburetor but is turned around so that the
inlet connection is toward the rear. The purpose
of this is to make the pipe between the carburetor
and the vacuum tank as short as possible. The
float valve is also larger in diameter to take care
of gravity feed. The choke and throttle controls
are, of course, somewhat different. 

 

The LaSalle carburetor adjustments are identical
with the 314 carburetor adjustments.
Two of the vent holes in the thermostat block
are different from those on the 314. The LaSalle
block is marked *'LaS" to distinguish it from the
314 block, (See Fig. 134). (A few of the first
LaSalle thermostat blocks are marked "2" instead
of "LaS.")
The temperatures at which the thermostats
open and close are the same as on the 314 carburetor.

 

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You are getting a lot of advice about the futility of this project. It is going to be a horror story. Deep depression will probably be a lasting result. The small detail things will be next to impossible to find.I imagine it is the worst idea of your life. Better drop it before it becomes an obsession. The most cynical are probably right.

 

Would you be so kind as to PM me the location and any information leading to ownership that you may have uncovered so far.

 

Thank you, Bernie

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7 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

You are getting a lot of advice about the futility of this project. It is going to be a horror story. Deep depression will probably be a lasting result. The small detail things will be next to impossible to find.I imagine it is the worst idea of your life. Better drop it before it becomes an obsession. The most cynical are probably right.

 

Would you be so kind as to PM me the location and any information leading to ownership that you may have uncovered so far.

 

Thank you, Bernie

I just literally pissed myself at this post. ill give you the location when its in my garage lol

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26_Cadillac-314-DV_11-RMH-001-800.jpg

 

1926

 

The Cadillac 314 was introduced in 1926 and served as a replacement for the V63 Cadillac of the prior year. The 314 name would be used again in 1927, with a slight modification being called the '314A', and replaced by the 341 in 1928. This was a significant vehicle for the Cadillac marque, as the company itself made a shift from the Henry Leland engineering era to the Earnest Seaholm and Harley Earle tenure. These new vehicles could be distinguished from past models by their nickel-plated radiator shell. which had been given a more-round appearance. All bodies were originally built by Fisher, but Fleetwood would be given the opportunity to work their craft later in 1926 and in 1927. 

The 314 came in Standard and Custom bodies for 1926. The custom line bodies were mounted on a 138-inch wheelbase and most were given a swing-out, single-pane, windshield . Open cars had vent wings. Other distinguishing features were the 10-inch drum headlights, roof bead molding which aided in keeping rain from entering the vehicle, exterior rubber-finished door handles, extra lighting such as panel lights and automatic dome light, running board mats, and a Motometer on the top of the radiator grille. The custom line also had a rear bumper and a double front bumper to help to protect the vehicle. The standard line could purchase the bumper for an additional $24 each. The custom line vehicles were elegant and well appointed, evident by their interior hardwood decorative panels, detachable vanity and smoker cases, silk cord handles, special seat fabric with springs for comfort, and electric gasoline gauge. 

The eight-cylinder engine displayed 314.4 cubic-inches, had three main bearings, Cadillac carburetor, and an available 87 horsepower. The engine was mated to a selective sliding gear three-speed transmission with multiple disc clutch and shaft 
drive. Mechanical brakes on all four wheels provided the stopping power. 

 

http://www.conceptcarz.com/z20889/Cadillac-Series-314.aspx

 

 

 

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 As for this car I would buy it as a parts car and put it in the far corner of my barn. That is only if it is real cheap. The biggest problem is there is no wood patterns I can see in the picture. As for the Fisher Body book it is only a guide.   Sorry the brutal truth as there are many many cars sitting abandoned in peoples garages that end up in an estate sale never finished.

 

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  • 3 years later...

I don’t know, but I definitely see my diamond tread tire, which, until Blockley came out with their’s hadn’t been seen in 80 (?) years....

(Man he really hit that right out of the park with these tires.)
21602C49-46F1-4FD4-AF7A-72AF013069B8.jpeg.e66ae853a0b1fe9eebbc3e9d6f3ea005.jpeg

85FDC16B-1C99-4452-A261-3419A2D933F3.jpeg

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Do you think it was a prank about him saying he wants to restore it. Or was he serious and thinking about restoring it. We may never know but he was not with us long as we may have scared him off also.  

The first Cadillac I did the body and paint was a 27 limo. 38 years ago. The owner passed away a few years ago and the car went to Portugal. 

  • JoinedOctober 3, 2017
  • Last visitedNovember 12, 2017
Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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