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What a great dash!


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In the 13th picture above, I think it needs a few more foot pedals!:lol:

 

The box on the steering wheel makes me think of Willys, but what are all those pedals for? A Model T it isn't.;)

 

There is a Willys Jeepster in this picture group, along with a '56 Buick.

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13 minutes ago, Frank DuVal said:

In the 13th picture above, I think it needs a few more foot pedals!:lol:

 

The box on the steering wheel makes me think of Willys, but what are all those pedals for? A Model T it isn't.;)

 

There is a Willys Jeepster in this picture group, along with a '56 Buick.

 

That is a 1914 Norwalk Touring car which was built in Martinsburg West Virginia. The company was started in Norwalk Ohio and later moved. The car in question was the last offering of the company. Here are a few more photos.

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There's a great story attached to this Norwalk.

 

It was made in Martinsburg, WV, as mentioned.  This is the only surviving Norwalk, and when it came up for sale a few years back, a group of individuals from Martinsburg joined together, raised the funds, and bought the car (and, it wasn't inexpensive!).

 

It now resides in it's home town!  http://norwalkmotorcar.com/  

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Oh my, this is embarrassing. That Norwalk was at our Fredericksburg AACA show a  few years ago. I didn't remember the many foot pedals. Where is the all red emoticon when you need it?

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4 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Oh my, this is embarrassing. That Norwalk was at our Fredericksburg AACA show a  few years ago. I didn't remember the many foot pedals. Where is the all red emoticon when you need it?

 

No worries Frank. It is hard to remember everything all the time. 

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13 hours ago, trimacar said:

There's a great story attached to this Norwalk.

 

It was made in Martinsburg, WV, as mentioned.  This is the only surviving Norwalk, and when it came up for sale a few years back, a group of individuals from Martinsburg joined together, raised the funds, and bought the car (and, it wasn't inexpensive!).

 

It now resides in it's home town!  http://norwalkmotorcar.com/  

Without sounding unkind, who picked the colors, and why? Bob

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Thanks for posting these nice photos. One of my favourite books to thumb through is "Dashboards" by David Holland, published 1994 by Phaidon Press, London, England, reprinted in 1999, ISBN 0 7148 3863 2. The 225 pages are sumptuously filled with full color/full page closeups of famous dashes, along with a short description of the car they belong to and the importance dashes have as an interface between the driver and the car's performance. All the classics are there, several early Mercedes, Bugatti, Rolls, Bentley, Duesenberg, Delage, Cord, Aston Martin, Model T, Jaguar, Hispano-Suiza, Isotto-Fraschini, Packard, Talbot-Lago, Buick, Chrysler Imperial, Alfa, Cadillac, Ferrari, etc, etc. Stunning photography. A must for anyone's Auto Library. 

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50 minutes ago, Gunsmoke said:

Thanks for posting these nice photos. One of my favourite books to thumb through is "Dashboards" by David Holland, published 1994 by Phaidon Press, London, England, reprinted in 1999, ISBN 0 7148 3863 2. The 225 pages are sumptuously filled with full color/full page closeups of famous dashes, along with a short description of the car they belong to and the importance dashes have as an interface between the driver and the car's performance. All the classics are there, several early Mercedes, Bugatti, Rolls, Bentley, Duesenberg, Delage, Cord, Aston Martin, Model T, Jaguar, Hispano-Suiza, Isotto-Fraschini, Packard, Talbot-Lago, Buick, Chrysler Imperial, Alfa, Cadillac, Ferrari, etc, etc. Stunning photography. A must for anyone's Auto Library. 

 

It is a great book.

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23 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

In the 13th picture above ... The box on the steering wheel makes me think of Willys .....

 

 

Look closely at the labels on the buttons: R N 1 2 3 4. It's proof that the Chryslers and Edsels of the 1950's were not the first to offer a push button transmission.

 

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This was a push button shifter that was available on some luxury cars in the early/middle teens. As I understand it the driver would select the next gear he/she needed, and when the clutch pedal was depressed electric solenoids would shift the transmission to the preselected gear. It always seemed to me to be a complicated solution to a problem that didn't exist.

 

Don

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The German Silver inlay was a Cadillac patented process. Used only in 1927. This pic shows the instrument panel in the worst condition since manufactured. It must be even more deteriorated now , after 2 1/2 more years of use. I do like the wonderful patina of originality. I have a theory that , just as in the case of antique furniture , if the wood was refinished and re-shellacked to bring back its like new glory , it would reduce its value. But it is just a theory ; I will not put it to the test !

 

And now that I have my foot in the door : Andy , do you have some connection to the B-17 , cockpit of which you have included ? You really do play with some magnificent toys ! Thanks for showing it !     - Carl

 

 

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Edited by C Carl
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Interesting to see how some manufacturers placed all instrumentation directly in front of the driver while a few centralized the instrumentation.  Also noting that like today with phones, computers and tablets, the entertainment (radio) was always placed dead center.

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7 hours ago, C Carl said:

The German Silver inlay was a Cadillac patented process. Used only in 1927. This pic shows the instrument panel in the worst condition since manufactured. It must be even more deteriorated now , after 2 1/2 more years of use. I do like the wonderful patina of originality. I have a theory that , just as in the case of antique furniture , if the wood was refinished and re-shellacked to bring back its like new glory , it would reduce its value. But it is just a theory ; I will not put it to the test !

 

And now that I have my foot in the door : Andy , do you have some connection to the B-17 , cockpit of which you have included ? You really do play with some magnificent toys ! Thanks for showing it !     - Carl

 

 

image.jpeg

 

C Carl, I was wondering if anybody would guess the B-17 correctly. Good eye. That is the Yankee Lady from Willow Run, Michigan. I had the honor of flying in her a few years ago. Next on the bucket list is a P-51.  

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  • 1 year later...

Being a big fan of KISS (keep it simple stupid), it is hard to beat the '31 Chrysler CD8 dash. My thanks to the owner who posted these 2 photos on internet, big help to me in making a reproduction for my Roadster project. What other dash could you make with a metal brake and a hole saw? BTW, some of the gauges are there just temporarily. Everything you see in this photo was missing from the car when I found it, dash was cut out, gauges missing, crank cover, even the headlight shown in background. Thank goodness for the internet and avid Chrysler guys. Hope to weld dash into cowl soon, joint will mostly be hidden by leather covered soffitt/trim piece.

CD8 Detail6.jpg

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On 1/26/2019 at 1:26 PM, Gunsmoke said:

Being a big fan of KISS (keep it simple stupid), it is hard to beat the '31 Chrysler CD8 dash. My thanks to the owner who posted these 2 photos on internet, big help to me in making a reproduction for my Roadster project. What other dash could you make with a metal brake and a hole saw? BTW, some of the gauges are there just temporarily. Everything you see in this photo was missing from the car when I found it, dash was cut out, gauges missing, crank cover, even the headlight shown in background. Thank goodness for the internet and avid Chrysler guys. Hope to weld dash into cowl soon, joint will mostly be hidden by leather covered soffitt/trim piece.

CD8 Detail6.jpg

CD8 Detail5.jpg

IMG_5425.JPG

 

Nice work!

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