Matt Harwood

1941 Buick Limited Limousine

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Good thoughts, Carl--you reminded me to make a stove pipe for the choke, which is probably important. I did that by taking a little section of 5/16 brake line and welding it in place. I had a spare Stromberg carburetor sitting around so I bolted it in place with some spacers to approximate the phenolic spacer that will be in place when it's on the car, and then measured the location of the stove pipe on the carb. Easy! Weld it in place, clean up the welds a bit, and it's ready to go. It may not be as effective as the one in the cast iron manifold, but it will work. 

 

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Adding a small stove pipe on the #3 header tube to heat the choke

 

As far as icing, I'm not sure that's something to worry about. While I drive my Buick a lot, I try to avoid winters. I know it can happen in cool, wet weather but there should still be plenty of convection coming off the headers and ambient heat in the engine bay to keep it above freezing. I've seen dozens of straight-8 Buicks (not to mention hot rodded straight-6 Chevys) with custom headers and intake manifolds that aren't heated and they don't seem to have icing problems. I am pleased that this upgrade should actually get some heat out of the carburetors and it should run that much better. I'm sure I'll have to re-tune the whole engine when I'm done, but with the synchronous carb linkage, I expected that anyway. 

 

Last thing today was to experiment with some mounting options. My current plan is to use 2-inch 3/8-16 studs in the heads plus chopped up pieces of the second header flange to act as spacers. Since there will be a weld bead around the tubes, I'll have to radius the corners where the tubes meet the flange, but this should offer a rock-solid mount. I also went to the store and picked up some seriously beefy 1-inch square washers that are about 3/16-inch thick. They'll take some grinding to make them clear the intake and exhaust tubes, but that will make them look that much cooler. Since I no longer have to worry about the cast iron moving around, a secure mount is my best bet. 

 

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Spacers and square washer should ensure a solid mount

 

Next up is getting the header finished and ready to ship and building the carb linkage. Oh, and I have to reinstall the rear shocks so I can use the car for my buddy's wedding on the 9th...

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Matt, is it right to pump exhaust into the choke housing?  Won't the particles from the exhaust ruin the choke spring or mechanism?   I was under the impression that these heat tubes went through the exhaust manifold all the way through the other side, so that vacuum in the carb could pull air through the tube,     where that air is heated before coming into the choke housing?

 

Edited by JohnD1956 (see edit history)

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9 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

Matt, is it right to pump exhaust into the choke housing?  Won't the particles from the exhaust ruin the choke spring or mechanism?   I was under the impression that these heat tubes went through the exhaust manifold all the way through the other side, so that vacuum in the carb could pull air through the tube,     where that air is heated before coming into the choke housing?

 

 

That's correct, John. The original heat pipe goes through the manifold and up into the stove pipe to the choke, although I don't believe vacuum pulls air through the choke and into the carb. The choke is just a bimetal spring wound inside a closed cylinder and the stove pipe feeds heat into it. As it warms up, the heat gradually relaxes the spring and opens the choke blade. I didn't make any holes in the header pipe, I just welded the pipe to the top of the tube, so no exhaust gasses will be going through it. Just heat and convection going up the pipe to the choke. I'll probably try to insulate it just to enhance thermal transfer to the choke. It will surely be less efficient than stock, but some is better than none. It's a snug fit but not air tight so it should move some hot air. Doing it now before it's ceramic coated should help, too.

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With all the exhaust work going on, you might forget that I still have rear shocks to reinstall. I removed them back in April and sent them to Apple Hydraulics, who rebuilt them with no problems. They've been sitting on the floor behind the Limited since they came back a few weeks ago, waiting for me to get around to reinstalling them. Now that I've agreed to use the Limited in my best friend's wedding next Saturday, I figured I'd reinstall them and get it ready to go. I told Melanie repeatedly that it wouldn't be a big deal. Two or three hours. Easy!

 

As you can imagine, it didn't go the way I expected.

 

I remembered that the shock link mounts were hacked up by some previous mechanic using a gas welder and I knew I'd have to press out the studs from the old shock links. So I started there. My first attempt was simply using a C-clamp and a deep socket to try to press the stud out. No dice. But what did happen was the crappy welds holding it all together totally failed and the thing came apart in my hands. Crap. On the upside, it made it easy enough to put what turned out to be a giant hex nut into my hydraulic press and knock the stud out easily. Then I put it on the wire wheel and cleaned the rust off and used the grinder to remove the old weld slag from Hacky McHackerson, the previous mechanic. I figured I'd clean up the mount on the axle and do a nice, clean, solid weld and all would be good. Bolt the shocks on and I'm done!

 

Double crap.

 

Turns out that the new shock links from Bob's Automobila, which they assured me repeatedly would fit a 90 Series, do not, in fact, fit a 90 Series. The stud is far too small and rattles around loosely in both the holes at the end of the shock arms and in the nuts that Hacky McHackerson used to rebuild the shock link mounts on the axle. My choices now are either find an NOS set of Limited shock links (yeah, right), find a different hex nut with a smaller inner diameter and weld that onto the axle instead, or just weld the shiat out of the shock link to get it to stick to the existing mounts and call it good enough, which is what Hacky McHackerson would have done. But if I do that, I or someone else in the future will curse my name, just as I'm cursing the guy who did all this low-quality work. I'm not willing to be that guy.

 

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So the nut forming the lower shock link bracket wasn't very well affixed and broke off. Meh, I can still work with that.

 

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Ooops, no I can't.

 

I'm troubled that the new shock link mounting studs are SO much smaller than the old ones. I can certainly make some kind of new lower mounting bracket with the right-sized holes, but if I stick with these flimsy shock links, I'll still have to make two of them, and I'm not excited about that. The mount on the driver's side, while also constructed from a giant hex nut, is very solid and not coming apart, so I'll have to cut it apart, too. It's made from the same kind of hex nut and it also has an oversized hole in it that's the same diameter as the one on the passenger's side. Even if I don't cut it apart and keep it intact, I still have to press the stud out of the driver's side, which, as I discovered, is easier said than done and everything might break during the attempt.

 

So I gave up and went home. As a Plan B, I started looking for giant hex nuts with smaller center holes, but didn't find anything I could get my hands in immediately. However, I did find a set of old-looking (and odd-looking) shock links on eBay, which I bought on impulse for a rather egregious $80 hoping they'll work. But will they arrive in time for me to reassemble the car for Saturday's wedding? Are the mounting studs larger than these light-duty ones from Bob's? Are they even long enough?

 

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Will these shock links work better? Are they larger? I wagered $80 that they will fit.

 

OK, so what if they don't fit? What's Plan C? My first thought is that I could just go get a few chunks of steel and fabricate some lower shock mounts and weld them in place, which isn't a bad idea. I could drill them for the small-diameter shock links and hope for the best. However, that doesn't really help me on the shock arms, which also have oversized holes that don't fit these wimpy links. I'd have to put a bushing in there or something, but that's a manageable problem. Or I wait for those shock links above to show up, hope the studs are the right size, and throw it together in time for the wedding on Saturday. If they show up on Tuesday, great, no problem. If they show up Friday afternoon, I might be boned. I'm back to thinking about just welding everything together for Saturday and then starting over at some point in the future. I hate myself for thinking that way. But my choices are either do some work now, while I have time, and risk that it will be for naught, or do nothing and wait until the last minute when I may still have to fabricate everything anyway. Sigh.

 

Hacky McHackerson, wherever you are, I hope your death was long and lingering and your progress was attended to by a doctor with skills equal to your own.

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Good evening Matt,

 

I am totally new to this forum so i don't know if phone numbers are appropriate or not, but my is 805-6895978 Richard CaiforniaPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldings. I may have a Fog Light pull for you and I am in the process of reproducing the moldings for the rubber gravel guards that appear to be missing on your wonderful car. I have one set now that is spoken for but it will be used as the model for the re pros if i get the green light that they can be done. I am already reproducing the curved moldings for the rubber gravel guards for Super and Roadmasters and think i will be able to do so for the Special, Century and Limited as well. I believe the limited moldings are a bit longer than and have a extra bend in them??  CPics rubber gravel guard moldingsould please measure the distance between the front edge of the your skirt mold and the back edge of your rocker molding allowing for the curve, I will be much more confident. Thank you

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On 6/4/2018 at 2:07 AM, 1941Buicknut said:

Good evening Matt,

 

I am totally new to this forum so i don't know if phone numbers are appropriate or not, but my is 805-6895978 Richard CaiforniaPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldingsPics rubber gravel guard moldings. I may have a Fog Light pull for you and I am in the process of reproducing the moldings for the rubber gravel guards that appear to be missing on your wonderful car. I have one set now that is spoken for but it will be used as the model for the re pros if i get the green light that they can be done. I am already reproducing the curved moldings for the rubber gravel guards for Super and Roadmasters and think i will be able to do so for the Special, Century and Limited as well. I believe the limited moldings are a bit longer than and have a extra bend in them??  CPics rubber gravel guard moldingsould please measure the distance between the front edge of the your skirt mold and the back edge of your rocker molding allowing for the curve, I will be much more confident. Thank you

 

You should have my E-mail messages--I have the Special/Century moldings you need and would buy a set of repro Limited moldings when/if you make them. Unfortunately, we'll have to get the length mesaurements for those moldings from another car, since my Limited has incorrect rocker moldings that may or may not be properly positioned. I'd hate to send you in the wrong direction, but surely someone else can provide that measurement. I'll be at a show next weekend and there will be at least one other Limited there, so I'll see about measuring the distance on his car (which has welded up rocker moldings from Doug S.--originals just don't exist anymore). I'm excited about this project!

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So we're a no-go with the Limited at the wedding today. The shock links up above that were so expensive showed up and they were the exact same repro pieces that I already had. Why show a picture of original-looking shock links and send out totally different repros? Not cool. After an extensive argument with the vendor (the son of the owner of the company that insists on doing it once and doing it right, LOL), I sent him the photos of his parts not fitting. To his credit, he said he'd take them back, no questions asked, but it still cost me $20 worth of shipping to not own shock links that I can't use. Feh. I also pointed out that I can buy these same crummy links from Bob's for about half of what I paid him and I paid the premium thinking I was getting some beefy NORS parts. I also pushed him a bit on "bait and switch" since I thought I was buying the links shown in his pictures, but I think he made an honest mistake in thinking that they were all the same and it wouldn't matter to the end user. They're not all the same and it doesn't help me today, but I don't think he was being intentionally deceptive. I told him to change both the photo in his listing and the description, but he hasn't yet. We'll see...

 

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What I thought I was buying.

 

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What I actually bought. No go.

 

Doug S. has some correct shock links for me and I'll pick them up from him next week and start putting the car back together.

 

So the Limited will not make the wedding. I was going to use the '29 Cadillac instead, and I might still take it, but the weather is crappy and Melanie has revealed to me that my friend who is getting married asked me to bring the old cars more for my sake than his own--he and his bride aren't car people and if it's hot AND rainy, they'll be happier in a modern car anyway. I appreciate the sentiment, but his wedding isn't about me or the cars, it's about him and his bride. Most likely we'll just leave the old cars at home and take the Suburban in case we need to shuttle people around. That seems like the right choice. My oldest son said we should take the Ferrari instead (he knows my friend's favorite TV show is "Magnum PI") but I think showing up at a wedding filled with former high school acquaintances in a Ferrari is a mistake--you can't help but look like a jerk who's trying WAY too hard when you do something like that.

 

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Don't. Just don't.

 

 

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If you bought the links on EBay, you could have sent them back with no cost to you.  Do a return through EBay and either they or the seller pays postage.

 

i had to do that with a seller who got pissy with me, he mailed a very fragile item in the thinnest cardboard box you can think of (think Model kit box).  It arrived broken, when I told him I wanted to return he said a three year old could fix the damage, then went on to tell me the loss of the sale would mean his grandkids wouldn't have anything to eat for a week......

 

I like how you named the seller in your case without naming the seller!

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9 hours ago, trimacar said:

If you bought the links on EBay, you could have sent them back with no cost to you.

 

Dang, I wish I'd known that. I just contacted him directly. He said send them back and he'd refund my money. He indicated that he'd refund my shipping, but I give it a 50/50 chance that'll happen. We'll see.

 

The wedding last night was lovely and nobody missed having an old car there. That was actually a relief. My friend was talking it up to everyone and they seemed to be disappointed that it wasn't there, but when it started to rain and we piled eight people in the Suburban with powerful A/C and blasted down the highway to dinner at 75 MPH while running a little late, both Melanie and I were relieved that we were not in a '41 Buick or '29 Cadillac. It was the right choice and the wedding was awesome in every way without an old car there. I'm so happy for my friend and his new bride, who is a wonderful person. It's kind of interesting to reconnect with people from your past--my friend's new bride was my high-school girlfriend's best friend back in the '80s, and her brother was a fellow I only kind of knew from being in the same class (of 500 people) but I always thought he was kind of a stuffed shirt. Turns out, age has a way of changing perspectives and I enjoyed getting better acquainted with him. I look forward to spending more time with all of them in the future now that it's all official.

 

But I digress.

 

Today, I finally finished the headers today by adding a second heat riser pipe for the rear carburetor. It is my plan to use two front carburetors and run them in parallel rather than in series. In speaking with another forum member who has done this, as well as with our resident carburetor expert, that seems like a change that pays notable dividends on these long inline engines. The fellow who has done this already reports that his car now idles so smoothly he keeps thinking it has stalled and that there's considerably better throttle response and more power at all speeds (it also makes a better sound, which I kind of like, too, since I'll be having to make a new exhaust system anyway). I haven't noticed any problems with power delivery on my car, but I never have been able to get it to idle as smoothly as I think a limousine should. On the other hand, this was a genuine hot rod motor in 1941, so I was never too worried about it--I doubt they were buttery smooth in '41. Anyway, it made sense to make preparations to have a second carburetor with a choke on the rear of the manifold, so I simply welded on a second little chunk of steel tubing to make it. It may or may not be as effective as the original heat riser, but the choke will work just fine, it just might be a little slower to respond. I can live with that. We'll box it up this week and send it back to be finished and hopefully scanned and blueprinted so they can duplicate it.

 

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Headers ready to go back to Sanderson for finish welding and ceramic coating (satin black). 

 

I also took the intake manifold I'll be using and did some clean up on the cuts I made for clearance. They were just rough chops with the cut-off wheel (I'm shocked by how easily this cast iron cuts--it's like butter!) so I spent some time cleaning up the rough edges and trying to make the radii look original. One mounting ear on the front carburetor heat box disappeared, but with some careful shaping, nobody will notice. The goal is for this whole modification to vanish and be invisible to all but the experts. I removed one exhaust manifold mounting hole and trimmed that area to look like it was never there, then smoothed out the rough cuts to eliminate sharp edges and places where cracks could start. I made sure there was enough clearance around the headers so that nothing would rub and the end result is nice and clean. I do wish I could have made a set of headers that could clear the manifold without cutting, but I just don't see how it's possible. If Sanderson does reproduce these for the rest of the market, they'll have to be sold with the caveat that the original intake manifold will need to be modified. And on a lark, I also test fitted a single carb intake I have, and it clears without issues. So these headers, if they make them available, should fit any 1936-1952 320 cubic inch Buick straight-8 with any kind of manifold. I hope that can help others.

 

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Before and after shows fairly extensive clearancing was required for the intake manifold, but nobody will notice once it's assembled

 

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Fortunately, it's virtually invisible as installed on the engine and most folks will never notice the changes. Nice!

 

I'll throw the intake in the sandblast cabinet this week, clean it up, then paint it Dante Red to match the rest of the engine. As soon as the headers come back, it will all be ready to install.

 

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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 Your shock link pictures look rather like my situation on my '41 Roadmaster, I know its' not a '90 series, and I understand the differences. But I ended up machining a new pin for my troublesome link. I'm not sure of the manufacturer, but I believe that they were of recent manufacture about 8-10 years ago. Its' the thread on my car"McLaughlin Buick Roadmaster coupe"

here.

 Keith

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I saw Doug S. over the weekend and he hooked me up with the correct shock links for a 90 Series. At first glance, they appeared almost the same, but the mounting studs are notably thicker and shorter and you'll note the link itself is a bit thicker, too. After I got back to the shop today and could test fit them, yes, they are indeed correct. Better still, they fit neatly in the giant hex nut, which  appears to have a correctly tapered hole--something I didn't expect from Hacky McHackerson the old mechanic. The fit is pretty darned clean. So I'll weld that back into place on the axle and make sure it holds and looks good, paint it satin black, then reinstall the links. I should never have a problem with the rear shocks again. 

 

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The correct links fit like they should. Seeing that the crude nut repair has a correct conical seat was a nice bonus.

 

I have one more detail on the headers before I can send them back to Sanderson--a hole in between the two center ports. It isn't present in the flange, but there's a threaded hole in the block and it was used to hold the two separate manifolds in place, so I thought it would be a good idea to make sure I could still use it. More (and more even) clamping force is a good thing when it comes to headers. Then I'll send them off to be finish welded and ceramic coated. In the meantime, I'm going to finish the intake and get it painted and rebuild one of the Stromberg carbs I have laying around so I have two front carburetors on the engine working in tandem. After talking to fellow board member Larry Helfand, who has already done this modification on his '41 Century and had tangible improvements, I'm very excited to see how it works.

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OK, back to work on the Buick and it's ambulatory once again. Doug S. supplied the correct shock links and I finally found some time to get in there and finish the job. I had to weld that mounting nut back into the suspension so I cleaned all the metal, which is critical for a good weld. A wire brush attachment on my die grinder cleaned it up nicely. I used the shock link itself to hold the nut in position so that there would be no alignment issues (the driver's side is off and it's probably going to chew up the rubber bushings in the link), then tacked it in place. I removed the shock link to keep the rubber from melting then finish welded the nut into position. the welds aren't pretty, but with a little grinding it works. A shot of black paint to protect it from rusting and I reinstalled the link. Done!

 

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The headers are back at Sanderson for a few weeks. They'll finish weld them and give them a satin black ceramic coating, then I should have them back. The next project here will be to sandblast and paint the modified intake manifold, find a second "front" carburetor, and get all the little parts in place, including the mounting studs, square washers, and spacers so it can all go together as soon as the header comes back. That part of the job isn't much fun, but it will be easier to have all the parts in place when it arrives--future Matt will appreciate my efforts on installation day.

 

Stay tuned...

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I love this car!

 

Totally unprepared, we jumped in at 10:00 last night and blasted to an event more than 60 miles away (our newly acquired 1935 Lincoln left us stranded and we needed a back-up). Did a parade in the morning, showed the car in the afternoon, then hammered home at 60 MPH in 94-degree heat without issue. Car ran rock-steady at 170-175 degrees, never stuttered or faltered, and remained eminently composed throughout. So comfortable and quiet, in fact, that Melanie napped most of the way and reports that the rear shocks make a significant difference in the way it rides (which was already pretty impressive). Smooth, fast, reliable. Old cars aren't supposed to be this good.

 

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Lincoln left us stranded just as the sun was setting

 

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Bulletproof Buick just works like it should, like it always does

 

I realized last night that I love driving this big Buick more than any car I've ever owned. The way it feels, the way it moves, the way it sounds, all of it is more satisfying than any other old car I've experienced, exhaust leak and all. It's shockingly powerful and fast for something so big and while it's not agile, it isn't difficult to manage in the least and you can steer it with just a finger. My excitement over the new Lincoln (and the ensuing disappointment when it died) were immediately erased when we were gliding along at 60 MPH through the cool night air with the car barely seeming to work at all, Cleveland Indians baseball game on the radio. And then today, it did the same thing except it was a radiator-destroying, gasoline-boiling, tire-torturing, oil-thinning 94 degrees. And the big Limited didn't even flinch. 

 

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View from the best seat in the house

 

If you don't have a Buick Limited, you're really missing out. Old cars simply don't get any better. Go get one. You won't ever regret it. I've never driven a better pre-war car. I've been doing cars for 45 years and I've never had one that I could get in and drive any time, any distance, at any speed, without a second thought. My father, who spent perhaps 40% of his time stranded by the side of the road in an old car, would think such a thing beyond belief.

 

Another very impressive performance by the car my lovely Canadian wife has taken to calling "Gretzky."

 

Here's a video Melanie made of the drive:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Matt,

Nothing like a 320 dual carb Buick. I feel the same way. Great cars!

 

Dennis

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13 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

View from the best seat in the house

 

Not quite -- it seems to me that the guy with his hand on the wheel is occupying that position!  ;)

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Header(s) are back from Sanderson. Beautiful work. Nice tight welds, no port blockage, smooth finish. Satin black ceramic finish inside and out should control temperatures and look good without drawing too much attention to itself. I still can't believe I made this.

 

I have our open house event this weekend, so I won't be able to get to work on it and there's still a TON of prep work to be done since I haven't done anything in preparation for the installation, up to and including sandblasting the intake and painting it. I may also have to find some slightly longer studs since they're not quite long enough for the locking nuts I bought to grab properly. Then there's making the spacers, and, well, I'm still a long way from the finish line. While I'm hoping that a stock exhaust system will fit, I bet it won't and I'll still need custom flanges to adapt to the three-bolt flanges on the header collectors. I am planning to have an all-new exhaust system fabricated, maybe in stainless, but we'll see what the budget allows. This project is getting VERY expensive.

 

Anyway, the header is gorgeous. I'll let the photos speak for themselves. 

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Matt, I would not worry too much about carb icing. Not sure your whereabouts, but with modern fuels I have never experienced icing and I've blocked off the heat riser on my intake manifold and deleted the hot air choke stove. I realise the 322 is a completely different beast from there 320 but I drove my car in 15 degree weather without issue this past year. 

 

Headers look nice! Hope they serve you well! 

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Matt

 

Headers look great! Will be anxious to see them mounted on the block. Not being very knowledgeable about 41’s, I wonder how they will work with the engine mounts on the side of the block as were used on the later years? Not sure when this change was made. 

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Dang, I've always loved 40-41 Buicks but you are really making me want one again.  Maybe that will be my next one.  Beautiful car you have. 

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Don't worry my Buick brothers and sisters, work didn't stop on the Limited just because I was dealing with that nightmare of a Lincoln. The Limited bailed us out more than once this summer and it remains my #1 favorite car of all time and I want it to be 100% for next season. Progress on the manifolds/exhaust system continued, starting with finishing the intake manifold so it will clear the headers. As I mentioned, it did require some strategic trimming and modifications, but nothing that would affect its operation, appearance or structure, which is nice. Yes, if you flip it upside-down you'll see where I cut away a bunch of it, but the actual part of the manifold that handles the air/fuel mix is completely unaffected. Besides, the cast iron is so thick, there's probably nothing I could do to hurt it. 

 

ModIntake8.thumb.jpg.7146b72aef166961c92b493e94cfced7.jpg ModIntake4.thumb.jpg.e1f2714da9f4f0a6d237038c7ca2f203.jpg ModIntake5.thumb.jpg.d0127a569ec861190d85c27507beb070.jpg
Manifold was surprisingly easy to modify. That old cast iron cuts easily with a cut-off wheel.

 

I trimmed the back part of the manifold, which is just the heater box around the bottom of the carburetor boxes where exhaust gas was recirculated to speed warm-up. Don't need that now, the headers aren't going to accommodate it anyway, so it's perfectly OK to cut it away. I trimmed it so as to keep it as invisible as possible, then smoothed and rounded the edges to give it a factory look. I'll admit I was tempted to remove casting flash and other "defects" but ultimately decided that I wanted it to look as OEM as possible, which meant keeping those flaws. I want it to blend in, not stand out and this isn't a hot rod. I'm still aiming for as much of an OEM look as possible.

 

Once I was happy with the modifications, I threw the whole thing in the blast cabinet and cleaned it up. Easy. I put some duct tape over the carburetor ports and the intake ports just to keep those machined surfaces from getting chewed up by the blasting, but obviously it didn't matter if sand got in there (just be extra careful to clean it out before putting it on an engine!). 

 

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Seal it up, clean it up.

 

I spent a lot of extra time blowing all the sand out of the nooks and crannies, particularly the manifold interior, then painted it Dante Red. I don't know how closely it'll match the paint on the engine, but close enough. I can always paint it again if it's way off. Note that I used a Scotchbrite disc on my die grinder to clean up the gasket surfaces for a good seal.

 

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Paint is Dante Red from Bob's Automobilia. From the top, the intake looks almost 100% stock.

 

Next up is making all the spacers and washers for mounting it, doing some mock-ups, then installing it on the car. I am going to build a custom 2.25-inch stainless exhaust system for it as well, I'm just trying to find the biggest, quietest muffler (in stainless) that will fit. I think Classic will make me one. My plan is to do 2.25-inch tubing from the manifolds to the muffler, then 2-inch tubing for the tailpipe where it doesn't really matter but space is tight. I just want it quiet. That'll be a fun project!

 

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Ready to go on the car!

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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I had some free time this afternoon and decided to make a change that I have been intending to make for a few months. I installed the fog lights last winter but I wasn't thrilled with the brackets. They put the fog lights too low and they were kind of hidden behind the bumper. It's a small thing, but I thought it looked a little odd. Plus they were painted and I figured a set of chrome brackets would help shine things up. So I bought a set of slightly taller brackets and threw them on there this afternoon. Took about 30 minutes and made enough of a difference that I'm happy. A stupid little thing, but I notice stuff like this and I like my stuff to be just right. Stupid thing to spend $40 or no?

 

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Lights as I was first installing them. They're a bit low down there
behind the bumper.

 

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Here it is with one of each bracket, new bracket on the driver's side. 

 

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And finished. Fog lights are about two inches higher than before and
I think it looks better and should work better, too. Stupid or not?
I can't 
tell anymore...

 

Tomorrow I'm going to try to get the little courtesy lights on the bottom of the front seat working. And since winter has finally arrived and driving season is officially over, it's time to dive in and start installing the new exhaust system. I'll get started on that over the Thanksgiving holiday, I think. Still some parts to gather and some things to fabricate, but the header should go on pretty easily. Of course, I've said such things before...

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 They look very nice, Matt. I agree that the lights look better with the taller brackets on.

 Good luck with your exhaust install. I'm sure you'll let us know how it goes.

 Keith

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