Matt Harwood

1941 Buick Limited Limousine

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12 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

is it possible that the rear two or three cylinders have been running super hot while coolant was 165 degrees and the engine ran perfectly all the time?

 

Is there a fitting somewhere near those rear cylinders where you could temporarily install a second (aftermarket) temperature sender and gauge?  Then you could see what's happening as you drive.

Edited by EmTee (see edit history)

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4 hours ago, EmTee said:

 

Is there a fitting somewhere near those rear cylinders where you could temporarily install a second (aftermarket) temperature sender and gauge?  Then you could see what's happening as you drive.

 

The back of the block by the firewall has the port for the factory temperature gauge, which has never worked on my car. I initially thought it was because the aftermarket gauge's sending unit took its place, but no, it's just broken. I have an NOS temperature gauge to install this is the time to do that. I'm not sure what is in the port for the sending unit, probably the original gauge's bulb--the rest of the unit is just hanging there. I don't know how accurate the factory gauge is, but maybe before I install it I'll do some testing with some boiling water to at least get a frame of reference. 

 

The more I think about it, I don't think anything is wrong temperature-wise. There's just no way that thing could run that cool and that well in such hot weather and still be cooking a few cylinders. If that header tube was coming undone due to heat, why aren't the ports on the cylinder head burned? The engine paint is far less tolerant of high temperatures than the ceramic coating. I think they just screwed up the coating and it's coming undone. I'll either have to paint it on the car or remove it (oh God, I don't want to do that) and send it to Jet-Hot to be re-coated with the good stuff. 

 

I'll post updates on everything as it progresses...

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Matt, you say the temp bulb goes into the block?  I have never owned a 320.  The 248/263 is in the head. And many of those have been broken needlessly.  Many folks do not realize the bolt  hole for the rocker stand directly above is a through hole. A longer bolt than factory is some times used and contacts the bulb, sorta locking it in place.

 

  Ben

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Went up to the hardware store and picked up some fittings to connect a second line to that blocked drain plug in the block and let the Evapo-Rust work on it from both sides. Unfortunately--and like usual--the car had other ideas. Turns out that the little plug in the block is indeed 1/4 NPT (pipe thread) but it's not tapered like a pipe thread. So it's the same but different. Why? Why do they do it that way? Every little thing unique. So I screwed in a 1/4 NPT fitting and felt it snug up, which I thought was good, but turns out it actually started stripping threads. I left it in there since it seems to be holding pressure, but I'll have to figure something out later once I need to seal it up. I'll probably have to drill and tap it for a 3/8 NPT plug. Won't that be delightful down there in the engine bay?

 

503285044_2020-02-1719_00_54.thumb.jpg.9a06fe13228fe64f2ada9fac73962729.jpg
Installed a fitting and some tubing to feed Evapo-Rust to the 

drain hole in the block. Note the air bubble...

 

It certainly appears that the drain hole is well and truly blocked. You can see the air bubble in the tubing above, demonstrating that there's zero movement of the liquid into the block. I loosened the fitting slightly to bleed off most of the air, but that's as much as I could get out without having liquid spraying all over the place. I do seem to recall that when I first bought the car, I had a local mechanic back-flush the block for me and he told that the drain plug was blocked; in his opinion it was a casting flaw and maybe it was never fully drilled out. I guess we'll find out. Maybe a pinhole will open up and the fluid will start to flow into the block. Or maybe I'll need to drill it out for a 3/8 plug anyway.

 

I also spoke with the folks at Sanderson Headers, who did the ceramic coating on my header. While they're perfectly willing to re-coat the headers--which I appreciate--they are also of the opinion that the air/fuel mixture is way out of whack and exhaust gas temperatures (EGTs) are so high that it's burning off a coating rated to 1900 degrees (they did note that the bolt adjacent to cylinder #8 is discolored, which would suggest a lot of heat). I don't rightly know how an engine with 7.5:1 compression and running under 3000 RPM could possibly generate that much heat, but OK, I'll look into it. I'll pull the plugs first and see what's going on, particularly in the rear cylinders. They also suggested using a 4-gas analyzer to tune it, and fortunately I have a friend who has one, so I'll do some more tuning once it's reassembled. Bigger jets in the carbs? Smaller? Just adjust the idle screws? 

 

I just can't understand how a car could run this well, this cool, and for this long if it had cylinders burning so hot that it destroyed a high-temperature ceramic coating. 

 

And, of course, the hits kept coming. The radiator shop called and told me that every time they fixed a seam on my radiator, another one would blow. The radiator is shot. Again, how the hell did this car run so cool and so effortlessly for so long with a junk radiator, super lean fuel mixture, bum water pump, and clogged water jackets? How?!?

 

Anyway, I told them to re-core the radiator. They have a modern 5-row core with straight fins that's slightly cheaper than a duplicate of the original core (it'll only be $1100), while an original-style core would probably be closer to what I paid for the Lincoln's radiator ($1800). Even though it should be better than before, I have a genuine concern that more changes will upset whatever perfect balance I had going on and it'll never run cool again. That's how things usually work for me--simple for everyone else, everyone else gets results, but when I try everything goes sideways. A new radiator, new water pump, and clean water jackets should mean it will run cool.

 

Anyone want to bet $10 that it runs worse than ever once I put it back together? I have zero faith in my abilities anymore. Bah.

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On many cars, heck almost every car I have pulled those plugs out of, the crap in the bottom of the block has plugged the hole and I have had to root around in there with a screwdriver or a piece of bailing wire to get things flowing. Once the flow starts the crud will break up much easier. Have you tried to pick away at it with anything? Was it just too solid?

 

As for the plug, I'll bet you will find it is tapered pipe thread, but the modern-era plugs are just rubbish, maybe a little too big or a little too tapered. Straight pipe threads do exist, but generally require something other than the threads to seal, and rarely if ever show up on American cars. Whether it's tapered or not, I'll bet once you get it derusted you will have another thread or two available, and it will probably work with the old plugs. If you can get them in mechanically solid, but worry about leaks, Indian Head will take care of that. I would use Indian Head on those even with perfect threads. Good luck and keep us posted. :)

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Well, the air bubble was gone this morning, so maybe something is happening after all. I can't see any notable fluid movement in the tubing yet, but I suppose that's a good sign.

 

1426818420_2020-02-1809_56_11.thumb.jpg.2d9a42f47614efe81e9c7248e2fc6b7b.jpg

 

I also reversed the hoses on the block this morning so it's flowing in the same direction as it does under normal operation. Going in reverse (in at the top and out at the bottom) was probably trapping a lot of air in the head even under pressure, so hopefully I'm hitting all the water jackets in the block AND head at at this point. The Evapo-Rust still looks pretty clean so I'll just give it time to work.

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Since you didn't go for my temp gun suggestion which would tell you definitively whether your running hot, look at the plugs. Should be easy to tell if you're way too lean on the rear 4 cylinders.  I check my plugs after every long run and make small adjustments to dial in the right setting. 

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2 minutes ago, valk said:

Since you didn't go for my temp gun suggestion which would tell you definitively whether your running hot, look at the plugs. Should be easy to tell if you're way too lean on the rear 4 cylinders.  I check my plugs after every long run and make small adjustments to dial in the right setting. 

 

It wasn't that I didn't go for it, it's that the car is currently inoperable without a water pump or radiator and since it's the middle of winter, I couldn't really take it out for a long, hot drive anyway. I do have a temperature gun, but it wasn't until the car was totally disassembled that I even noticed the burned ceramic coating so I didn't even know there was an issue. All indications were that the car was perfectly healthy and running great--I had no reason to go looking for a problem because none were evident in the car's operation.


Of course the first thing I am going to do once it is reassembled is take it out and get it hot and then I'll check all the temperature points, both in the cooling system and the exhaust system. In the meantime, it's my plan to pull the plugs and have a look.

 

Nothing adds up right now. A great-running car that maintained 165 degrees under almost all circumstances and never went above 180 no matter what, is now showing anecdotal signs of serious overheating in several cylinders. A car that started instantly, idled well, didn't burn its oil, and didn't blow smoke seems to have a fuel mixture so out-of-whack that EGTs are above 1900 degrees. I just can't reconcile those things.

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Of course, my apologies. I'm a bit skeptical it's the fuel mixture because it would have run like crap with the mixture so wrong.  You know more than I but I would put it back together and take the temp checks you mentioned to confirm there's a problem. Might be other reasons the header paint failed. 

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13 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Went up to the hardware store and picked up some fittings to connect a second line to that blocked drain plug in the block and let the Evapo-Rust work on it from both sides. Unfortunately--and like usual--the car had other ideas. Turns out that the little plug in the block is indeed 1/4 NPT (pipe thread) but it's not tapered like a pipe thread. So it's the same but different. Why? Why do they do it that way? Every little thing unique. So I screwed in a 1/4 NPT fitting and felt it snug up, which I thought was good, but turns out it actually started stripping threads. I left it in there since it seems to be holding pressure, but I'll have to figure something out later once I need to seal it up. I'll probably have to drill and tap it for a 3/8 NPT plug. Won't that be delightful down there in the engine bay?

 

503285044_2020-02-1719_00_54.thumb.jpg.9a06fe13228fe64f2ada9fac73962729.jpg
Installed a fitting and some tubing to feed Evapo-Rust to the 

drain hole in the block. Note the air bubble...

 

It certainly appears that the drain hole is well and truly blocked. You can see the air bubble in the tubing above, demonstrating that there's zero movement of the liquid into the block. I loosened the fitting slightly to bleed off most of the air, but that's as much as I could get out without having liquid spraying all over the place. I do seem to recall that when I first bought the car, I had a local mechanic back-flush the block for me and he told that the drain plug was blocked; in his opinion it was a casting flaw and maybe it was never fully drilled out. I guess we'll find out. Maybe a pinhole will open up and the fluid will start to flow into the block. Or maybe I'll need to drill it out for a 3/8 plug anyway.

 

I also spoke with the folks at Sanderson Headers, who did the ceramic coating on my header. While they're perfectly willing to re-coat the headers--which I appreciate--they are also of the opinion that the air/fuel mixture is way out of whack and exhaust gas temperatures (EGTs) are so high that it's burning off a coating rated to 1900 degrees (they did note that the bolt adjacent to cylinder #8 is discolored, which would suggest a lot of heat). I don't rightly know how an engine with 7.5:1 compression and running under 3000 RPM could possibly generate that much heat, but OK, I'll look into it. I'll pull the plugs first and see what's going on, particularly in the rear cylinders. They also suggested using a 4-gas analyzer to tune it, and fortunately I have a friend who has one, so I'll do some more tuning once it's reassembled. Bigger jets in the carbs? Smaller? Just adjust the idle screws? 

 

I just can't understand how a car could run this well, this cool, and for this long if it had cylinders burning so hot that it destroyed a high-temperature ceramic coating. 

 

And, of course, the hits kept coming. The radiator shop called and told me that every time they fixed a seam on my radiator, another one would blow. The radiator is shot. Again, how the hell did this car run so cool and so effortlessly for so long with a junk radiator, super lean fuel mixture, bum water pump, and clogged water jackets? How?!?

 

Anyway, I told them to re-core the radiator. They have a modern 5-row core with straight fins that's slightly cheaper than a duplicate of the original core (it'll only be $1100), while an original-style core would probably be closer to what I paid for the Lincoln's radiator ($1800). Even though it should be better than before, I have a genuine concern that more changes will upset whatever perfect balance I had going on and it'll never run cool again. That's how things usually work for me--simple for everyone else, everyone else gets results, but when I try everything goes sideways. A new radiator, new water pump, and clean water jackets should mean it will run cool.

 

Anyone want to bet $10 that it runs worse than ever once I put it back together? I have zero faith in my abilities anymore. Bah.

Hi Matt, Sorry to hear of more issues with the limited. I am having some myself and its upsetting indeed. I had my radiator recored for about 400$ a couple of years ago and am stunned at the amount you mentioned. I used a great shop on Long Island NY    http://caparadiator.com/  Worth sending it to them. Hopefully still as cheap. 

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Matt, I wonder if your rearward cylinders might be running a little lean compared to the forward cylinders?  If this was the case then symptoms could be hard to detect and if too lean will cause higher operating temps but only in the cylinders with low fuel to air ratios.  Does the entire length of your exhaust manifold have baked coating? Possible conditions causing a cylinder to run lean could include a vacuum leak, but also some intake manifold condition causing different air/fuel ratios to the individual cylinders.  Just hypothesizing from 328 (or whatever) miles away.

 

Also, air fuel ratios at idle are not typical as are the conditions are when the engine is running at higher rpm's.  Air fuel ratios at idle are governed by the metering rather than the orifice velocities through the carb.  That said, measured EGT's at idle are not as accurate as they are at speed.  The burnt ceramic coating, to me, is sufficient indication of high EGT's out of your rear cylinders.

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)

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Matt, I know there are a lot of us reading all the issues you are experiencing and going through and the effort you are putting in to get your 90 series "right" again , thinking "we wish we could be there to help" in some way. Many of us own the same era cars with the same engine! Your experiences as frustrating as they may be are a REAL LEARNING experience for the rest of us! I think I can say for all of us - thank you for sharing what you are working on as well as how you are trying to solve the problems of an 80 year old motor. AND YES these grande old cars still give us pleasure.

Walt

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I'm still not convinced anything is wrong. This was supposed to be simple preventive maintenance, nothing was broken. Yes, the water pump was a little noisy and one of the seams on the radiator leaked a little, but it has been that way for years. The car ran like a freight train and maintained 165 degrees (on a very accurate gauge) almost all the time. As a result, I'm not really attacking this situation as "solving a problem," but rather using it as an opportunity to prevent future ones.

 

I took this photo yesterday showing the header collector, which is also flaking. It's certainly possible the engine is running so lean that ALL the cylinders are extremely hot, but I'm not sure a car with 7.5:1 compression running below 3000 RPM could generate so much heat that the entire header would be heated to to the point of failure. I mean, the sucker would glow red at night if it were really running THAT hot. Other nearby equipment and paint would be getting cooked. Welds would be failing. My T-304 stainless exhaust system would be blue. And it would not start instantly, idle almost silently, and hammer along at 65 MPH for hours on end at 165 degrees with a sub-standard radiator and clogged cooling passages. Plus there's a big carburetor RIGHT THERE feeding the rear cylinders. The very same carburetor that fed all 8 cylinders perfectly for years before I moved it to the rear position. No, one symptom does not suggest a disease. I really do believe the coating is simply defective.

 

1875908946_2020-02-1817_28_07.thumb.jpg.deebc6e1f3c9fbdde4389fa3496b223a.jpg

Coating is flaking all the way down on the collector. Not sure
this particular engine can generate
that much heat.

 

It's certainly worth investigating the carburetors and I'm going to use my friend's 5-gas analyzer, but if anything the thing seems to be rich, not lean given my hard-start-when-cold issue. I believe everything is pretty close to right, because it runs beautifully. Nothing could run this well if things were THAT wrong. No way.

 

My plan is to simply work the plan. Install the new water pump, install the new radiator, clean out the water jackets as best as I can (my little electric Evapo-Rust pump finally gave up the ghost yesterday after a month of near-constant operation), and put it all back together. Use the carburetor tweaks recommended earlier in this thread to get the chokes dialed-in, use my friend's gas analyzer to tune it properly, and then when it's warm enough outside to give it a real-world test, go out and hammer it. Then I'll evaluate temperatures on the exhaust and in the cooling system.

 

And then we'll know for sure.

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Matt - a handheld infrared pyrometer is not overly expensive.

 

Jon.

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17 minutes ago, carbking said:

Matt - a handheld infrared pyrometer is not overly expensive.

 

Jon.

 

I have one. As soon as the car is running again, that's my first test. I didn't know about any of this other stuff until I disassembled the car.

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For what it's worth I have had an issue with flaking powder coat on my factory manifolds on my 320 due to heat. This is on my 80C where everything was baked and cleaned and re-cored, etc. 

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On 2/19/2020 at 7:47 AM, kgreen said:

Also, air fuel ratios at idle are not typical as are the conditions are when the engine is running at higher rpm's.

 

I agree that idle and cruise are two different situations.  It seems to me that it's possible to have good air/fuel at idle and become lean at high RPM.  Cam timing (i.e., intake/exhaust overlap) increases scavenging at high RPM.  Add to that the fact that your fancy headers must be much less restrictive than the original 'log' manifold.  You may need to increase main jet size.  As others have said reading the spark plug condition and EGT should tell you what's going on.

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Powder coat on exhaust manifolds is really not the way to go for durability - I do not believe you have a problem.

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On 2/22/2020 at 11:57 AM, John_Mereness said:

Powder coat on exhaust manifolds is really not the way to go for durability - I do not believe you have a problem.

 

It's not actually powder, it's a ceramic coating. Not precisely sure what the difference is, but it's specifically designed for this application. It's the way the Sanderson headers come from their factory and they offer a lifetime guarantee. Since mine were not technically made by Sanderson (I cut up a set of their small block Chevy headers and modified them extensively) they were willing to coat them using the same process and they're standing behind it. They'll re-coat them if I want them to. Their advice that something is amiss is what led me down this rabbit hole. I'm currently of the opinion that these are simply symptoms in search of a disease, and once it's back together I'll be able to assess.

 

And with that, I am closer to putting it back together. I picked up my beautiful new radiator and it's ready to install. Ellet Radiator does nice work and used the original tanks and side panels with a new core. I've expressed my concerns about whether a new core will work as well as the old one, but no way to know until we drive it in the heat of the summer. It certainly looks beautiful and it's enormous--easily four inches thick. Original fittings and tanks make it look right and hopefully it will have a flow rate about equivalent to the original so that the water pump moves the coolant properly. I'll paint the water pump tonight and put it all back together this weekend--we have a seminar here on Saturday so it'll probably be Sunday before I get to it.

 

2-26-20-1.thumb.jpg.0b442e8f7505c76f40ec737903836c18.jpg  2-26-20-3.thumb.jpg.fbca72873f2bffd3bc69c2f004fae3fb.jpg

New radiator certainly is beautiful.

 

2-26-20-2.thumb.jpg.5046259f2534b06b055a1843c92a7e2e.jpg  2-26-20-4.thumb.jpg.16a3fac95c4ffbd5817c49dd2c34d3b4.jpg

Reusing the original tanks makes it look 100% original. Let's hope it cools as well as the old one!

 

In the meantime, I'll keep running the Evapo-Rust through the block. I repaired my little circulation pump, which gave up the ghost last week. I figured the impeller shaft had sheared since no fluid was moving. I took it apart and found that the shaft was intact and spinning, but the impeller was done. It's a little rubber impeller cast around a brass collar that locks it to the shaft. The rubber had simply detached from the brass collar and it was spinning helplessly. Also one of the vanes had broken off--you can see it in the photo below. Fortunately, replacement impellers are cheap and common so I ordered three spares for $20 and popped a new one in there. Good as new! I have to admit, I'm really impressed with this cheap Chinese pump. I expected it to give up the ghost weeks ago after continuous duty under load, but it hasn't missed a beat other than that cooked impeller which is apparently a typical issue. Not bad for $70.

 

2-26-20-5.thumb.jpg.cb9d03177e4f3a7562670d542c4408ee.jpg

You can see where the original impeller lost a vane and
its brass collar. New impeller works just fine!

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Ha -- that looks like an outboard motor water pump impeller...

 

2-26-20-5.thumb.jpg.cb9d03177e4f3a756267

HTB1_5iGQVXXXXXUXXXXq6xXFXXXK.jpg?width=

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I was hoping to have the cooling system all buttoned up this weekend, but I'm not sure I'll make it. I have all my parts painted and the others back from the powdercoater, the radiator is done, and the Evapo-Rust seems to have done its thing--the metal visible through the water pump openings is clean, although the block drain never cleared itself. I still managed to drain out all but about a gallon of Evapo-Rust, so I'll do a fresh water flush while I'm testing it, then drain and fill with coolant when I'm sure it's not leaking.

 

2-29-20-3.thumb.jpg.20d792f2ca8331418a7fe6c88bdfb724.jpg
Parts ready to install. The fan should technically be satin black
instead of gloss black, but since I was doing a batch of gloss
black parts for the '35 Lincoln, I had them do the fan as well.
The pulley is satin silver, which approximates the original
cad plating. The Dante Red parts are painted using engine
enamel from Bob's.

 

The engine was rebuilt shortly before I bought the car and it appears that it was painted after assembly, including the water pump, so the block behind the water pump was bare and the rest of the front of the engine was pretty shabby. I cleaned it up, degreased it, and painted it Dante Red as well. The new paint matches the old pretty well and with the pump in place, nobody will notice. I found a number stamped into the block behind the water pump that I don't remember seeing before and I'm not sure what it means--it doesn't match the engine number stamped on the pan rail. A part number? Any ideas?

 

2-29-20-2.thumb.jpg.23744681b6a5e825549132af903e9980.jpg  2-29-20-1.thumb.jpg.00465858426eea4c10868f71d040fc2b.jpg
Front of the engine was pretty scruffy. No idea what the number stamped on the pad

means. I hit everything on the front of the engine with a wire brush and some solvent to
clean it in preparation for paint. Note the expanding freeze plug I used in the water pump
hole in the block, just to keep the remaining Evapo-Rust from trickling out and ruining
the wet paint. 

 

2-29-20-5.thumb.jpg.50946e4ec3b33ca68920e59650bb1ac6.jpg  2-29-20-4.thumb.jpg.2cb3feb0bd8bf190edc0e617466bbd58.jpg  
Finished. I used a little paint brush, which is easier to manage when there's a

lot of other stuff nearby. It gives a crisper result. While I was in there, I also
sprayed the frame and splash pan with some satin black. Not ideal, but
better than the bare metal and scale that was there before.

 

Now before I rush in and start reinstalling parts, I figured this would be the ideal time to fix the factory temperature gauge. Like most of them, the bulb broke off in the block and is stuck there, so the gauge is not working. Since I have the cooling system empty and apart, I figured I'll pull the broken bulb and install an NOS gauge I happened to have on the shelf. Unfortunately, while testing that NOS gauge I discovered that it, too, is inop--after all these years of being shuffled around, it probably suffered a small break in the tubing somewhere and the ether inside leaked out. Meh. I can find another and I guess I'll press on with the job and worry about it later.

 

2-29-20-6.thumb.jpg.e0fa94668ea3b475579ceba5b59c77e6.jpg
NOS gauge is not working. That's OK, since the face is discolored
anyway. I'll try to find another or have John Wolf fix this one for me.
In the meantime, I'll put everything else together and get the car running.

 

I have new upper and lower hoses, correct hose clamps, a new 160-degree thermostat, and a fresh belt. I'll make fresh gaskets. I'm also glad I pulled that spring out of the old lower hose because the new one didn't come with a spring. One of the hassles with the installation is that little chunk of hose between the thermostat housing and bypass and the water pump--it's about two inches long and clamped on both ends. It's a bad design because the hose rots and you can't replace it without removing the thermostat bypass. I have some black silicone hose that I'm going to use along with a set of those heat-shrink hose clamps--it should look clean and last forever without the risk of leaking in the future.

 

WaterPump1.thumb.jpg.d02cf5807326bd1d028d9b8e5ae04251.jpg
Little chunk of hose between bypass housing and water pump
(arrow) is a design flaw in an otherwise awesome engine. I
have a plan to minimize the risk of failure in the future.

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Matt, I believe that number SHOULD match the one on the side. Does on my '50.  Engine was probably changed at one time, and the number on the side was ground off and re stamped.  If your number has any "1" or "6" or "9" check them closely.  The 1 should look [ and is ] like an upper case I. 6&9 should be lower case b.  This was done often in the past.   

 

  Ben

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Same here on the number under the water pump.  On my car, it matched the number on the block.

 

With regard to the temperature gauge, I think you are certainly better off postponing the replacement of the factory gauge.  I may be missing something, but from my own experience I would say that pulling the instrument panel and installing the new gauge is a monumental job compared to what you have done with the radiator and water pump.  Getting that panel off and back on is by far the most difficult thing I have done with my car, and that was with the front seat out and the center chrome piece and radio removed.  There is almost no room to work in there, and you will wish you had a crew of leprechauns to help you.

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Thanks, guys. My numbers don't match at all. My engine is from a Roadmaster, so it starts with a 7 instead of a 9, but it doesn't match the number on the front. That seems odd, doesn't it? I'll double check but here's a photo of my stamping pad and it's not the same at all, even though you can't see the leading 7, which is not even close to being in line with the other numbers.

 

DSC_5060.thumb.jpg.14b19b34c21affa4fcc6ef81eea43e9e.jpg

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4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Thanks, guys. My numbers don't match at all. My engine is from a Roadmaster, so it starts with a 7 instead of a 9, but it doesn't match the number on the front. That seems odd, doesn't it? I'll double check but here's a photo of my stamping pad and it's not the same at all, even though you can't see the leading 7, which is not even close to being in line with the other numbers.

 

DSC_5060.thumb.jpg.14b19b34c21affa4fcc6ef81eea43e9e.jpg

Thankfully that "wrong "number will be concealed under the cover of the water pump.  I suppose it could bother some that they dont match but realistically, its a '41 and who else really needs to know?

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