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citizenjp

How rare is a 1929 Model A with the original motor?

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I have a buddy that wants to sell his 1929 Model A. It's almost fully restored and has the original motor with matching serial numbers to the body. I'm curious to know how rare it is to find this vehicle with the matching engine.

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My '30 A has the original engine and it might be rare. Ford replaced engines and re-stamped the serial #'s. so sometimes the engine #'s match even if it was not original to the car initially. I doubt the value would increase, but certainly interest may increase.

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Nice car.  Paint and interior look very stock and in great condition.  I'm not that familiar with Model A, what is the engine number matched to?  I know there's a frame number that you can only see if you lift the body, does the frame number correspond to the engine number?

 

Model A and Model T are such interesting models made by Ford, as just about everything from all the years (more or less) bolts on and off, and in 80-100 years, a LOT of bolts get turned.  Model T, particularly, is prone to being bastardized by later model add ons....

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The "Matching Numbers" deal was started with 1950's Chevrolet restorers, trying to make the cars somehow more interesting. You can't see the Model A chassis number so claiming it matches is meaningless. Bob

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I agree with 1937hd45 in that fact that matching an engine to a particular car is almost impossible. Many engines were built several months prior to installation in a chassis and the real vehicle no. is the number of the engine installed at time of build. Most Model A's will have had at least one engine swap in it's lifetime. Engines numbers are considered "original"  if the number falls within a range of numbers that could have been available within a certain time frame of the original build, but both serial number on the top frame rail and on the engine must match to be original to a particular car. It's nice to have a car with the original engine but it really doesn't increase the value. The body number will not match any other number and was never intended to be the car's serial number although, through the years , I have seen several cars that have had their serial number changed to the body numbers on titles for easy I.D. because of the real serial number placement.Your '29 car has the 1928 fluted headlamp lenses that were discontinued by 1929. It also carries a non authentic horn I wouldn't be too concerned about the engine.

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Corvette guys invented matching numbers and thats where it should stay IMHO. It is getting ridiculous. Trying to pretend that older cars are more valuable because they have "matching numbers" is silly, especially a Model A where they built four million of them, all with the exact same motor. It has zero to do with your friend's car's value especially since you cant prove it anyway. Dont go looking for a value added thing where there isnt one. Just a nice honest Model A. No more no less.

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Thanks all. I didn't think the value would increase much, if any. But with all the Model A's that are chopped up and rebuilt as hot rods, I found it interesting to see one restored back to its original form. It still needs some work, but at least the buyer of this one will be starting with a Model A that can be taken in any direction. I appreciate everyone's feedback.

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If I remember my Model "A"s right, the red steering wheel is an early'28 feature...................still, a nice, solid looking "A"!

 

Iowa Dale

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Hopefully the car will stay as is and no one will "chop, channel, and small block Chevy" a good original car.

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1 hour ago, Larry Schramm said:

Hopefully the car will stay as is and no one will "chop, channel, and small block Chevy" a good original car.

 

I'm a hot rodder, but I absolutely agree with Larry in that original cars that are complete, or nearly complete, should remain 'original'.  There are plenty of basket cases out there that would lend themselves to hot rodding, which could save them from the crusher ... or just rusting away in a field somewhere.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Fluted lens, red steering wheel, emergency brake in front of the shifter and drum tail light are all correct for 28 and very early 29. Nice car

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to get an idea when the car may have been built look at the upper left outer firewall. There you will find a date stamped into it and it may appear upside down...Some hold to the idea that this date is the car's build date while others think that it's the date that the body was built. Neither has been confirmed, but it does give an idea when the car was built, which helps in determining what parts are correct for that car.

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Our hobby, I think, is putting far too much emphasis

on "rarity."  Surely everyone likes to have something

different, being an individual, but hasn't everyone noticed how

often the term "rare" is overused these days?  "Rare," 

"very rare," "ultra rare."  Even a common model may be said

to have a rare color or rare combination of options!

 

When perhaps 20% of cars advertised 

are promoted as being rare, it shows us that they really aren't rare.

 

Let's forget "rarity."  To the general public, machines manufactured

40, 60, 80 years ago are all scarce compared to today's vehicles.

Enjoy the cars for the historical pieces they are!

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It's a decent Model A that would be great for touring.  Lots of things needed yet to finish the restoration but seems to be a good basic car.   These are great entry level vehicles.  I've always wanted a nice 28 or 29 Tudor sedan but need to buy a garage stretcher first though.  Whats the price on it?

Terry

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As long as the numbers match the numbers on your registration there isn't an issue. My Model A has it's original engine and it's really not that rare to see one with an original engine. Model A's were so plentiful that if an engine went bad it was easy to go to a scrap yard and pick one up. The number that is stamped on the top of the frame near the drivers side front is not visible unless you lift the body. Let us know the engine number and we can tell you what month and year your engine was built. The Model A Ford Judging Standards accept engine placement into cars three months after assembly. From mid 1928 till September 1929 the date of manufacture was stamped on the left side of the firewall. Nice car!

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I would speculate that 1/2 of the model A's left have matching numbers. No true added value unless you are going for a fine points car.

 

today the tudor is the most common of all models and brings the lowest price. 10 years ago, nobody wtd the 4 dr. but times have changed. the 4 drs are now considered desirable for touring.

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For those that think the "matching numbers" thing is a 1950's or a Corvette thing, it goes way back the the early brass era autos. Early build sheets are what was used to verify "matching numbers" on many pre-1910 vehicles. Some manufacturers records are lost or destroyed but those original build sheets are the basis for verifying a year of production, model number, Selden Patent number, body style, motor number, axel ratios, wheel size, date of sale, destination etc. etc.. Not to say an engine might need replacement, but if the replacement was identical to the original and re stamped, is it not still a numbers matching vehicle?  This confusion with numbers matching and date code identification is for the purist that wants everything just perfect and is willing to go to any length to make it so. Personally, I prefer original equipped, and numbers matching, if verifiable. If that is not possible then it is just another ride. Just an opinion, don't take it too seriously.

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