MCHinson

1938 Buick Century Model 61 - Four Door Touring Sedan - Trunk Back

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On 6/7/2020 at 4:33 PM, MCHinson said:

When I first tested the clock in the 1938 Buick project, it worked. I cleaned it up and installed it. Sometime since that time, it quit working. Today I removed the clock and disassembled it. The points on the self winding mechanism were badly pitted. I do know that a dying battery can cause the clock to hang up and repeatedly try to operate the winding mechanism resulting in pitting of the points if the voltage gets too low due to a dying battery. I don't know if that happened due to the battery on the car dying, or if the clock is what killed the previous battery. I cleaned up the winding mechanism points. I then tested the winding mechanism and it now works fine. The clock itself seems to stop working before it gets to the point where it rewinds so it clearly needs to be reoiled. I will take it to a local clock shop to have it oiled before reassembling it and re-installing it. 

I now  always put in a switch so clock only works when I am around and I want it to work.  They are really hard on a battery on a car that is not used at least a couple times week. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I have not had similar results. The clock on my 1937 Century runs all the time with no problems with the battery. I do like to drive my cars year round. These clocks take one small electrical pulse about every three minutes to rewind the mechanical clock mechanism. The previous battery appeared to have a bad cell. The clock may have aggravated that problem, but with a good battery, the clock should not be a problem under the conditions that I use the cars. 

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Posted (edited)

I am scheduled to take the car to the glass shop on Tuesday morning. They have been backed up for weeks and that was the first appointment available. I decided to something on the car this evening. The original back window shade assembly was in really bad shape. I bought a better one from Dave Tacheny. The mounting hardware on the replacement one is in good shape. The spring is in good shape, but of course the shade material will need to be replaced. The roller assembly is rusty from decades of humidity being attracted to the shade material that was rolled around the metal roller. I removed the shade fabric and wirebrushed the rust from the metal roller. The original shade material had a bit of material sewn into the leading edge that was slid into the slot on the roller. Of course that material simply broke away from the shade. After wirebrushing the roller, I spent some time using small picks to dig out the remains of the shade material in the slot on the roller. (I still have some of that job to do tomorrow.)

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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Any updates? I've grown accustomed to reading your daily reports. :) Hope all is well, and everything worked out at the glass shop.

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Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, Ken_P said:

Any updates? I've grown accustomed to reading your daily reports. :) Hope all is well, and everything worked out at the glass shop.

 

I was expecting it to be raining yesterday morning and was not looking forward to driving in the rain to the glass shop. Despite the forecast calling for rain and the fact that we received over 5 inches of rain in the past two days, I got the car to the glass shop yesterday morning without any rain falling on it. I was happy for the unexpected break in the rain. 
They told me it woud probably take 2 days. Yesterday afternoon, I stopped by and they had the back glass in, but not the windshield. Just a few minutes ago, they called to say that they have finished, so I will be on the way to pick it up shortly.  

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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I picked it up and drove home without needing any goggles.

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Posted (edited)

Is it about finished? Are there any more things to do on it? It looks GREAT! All I see needed is wipers.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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I still have to install the wiper blades, rear view mirror and the inside garnish mouldings for the windshield and rear glass. Other than that, I am waiting for the reupholstered visors, rear carpet, and rear window shade. I am helping a friend this afternoon on another vehicle so I may not get back to the Buick until tomorrow.

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Posted (edited)

This afternoon, I was finally able to wash the car. This evening, I installed the wiper blades.

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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Today I installed the front windshield moulding and the inside rear view mirror. I then installed the rear window center divider trim and the rear window moulding. The rear window moulding is currently held in place with a few screws as I don't seem to have enough of them in good condition to use. I will see if I can buy some at my local hardware store tomorrow. If not, I can order them. 

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MCHinson, you did an incredible job on the Buick. Wonderful work. Thanks, John

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Today, I picked up some addtional matching screws and installed the rest of the needed screws in the rear window garnish moulding. I now am waiting for my upholstery shop to finish the rear carpet, sunvisors, and rear window shade. The only other thing is I have to decide what to do on the radio. I could install the original for appearance and install a hidden radio elsewhere, send the original radio off for restoration, or open it up and attempt to repair it myself. I do have a bit of an electronics background. I will probably open it up and see if there is any obvious quick fix before I send it off because I would prefer not to spend the money and have to wait the time to get it restored if there is any alternative. It is a long shot, but I will probably check it out just for the amusement factor.  

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Posted (edited)

Since the car is basically complete, I drove it to lunch today. 

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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Congratulations. Glad you took the Buick out for a ride. 

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Matt, the car looks great! Enjoy cruising the NC coast roads in that beautiful Buick. 😊

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I have been following this thread since the beginning and it is a true inspiration how you brought that car back. Wonderful Buick, amazing work, and thank you so much for taking us all along with you  throughout its restoration! 

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It has been over a month and I am still waiting for my upholstery shop to take care of those minor interior items before I can call this project totally finished.

 

In my recent driving, I discovered that the trip odometer was not working on the speedometer that I had installed in the car. I decided to solve that problem today. I had another speedometer that looked good except for the faded red paint on the pointer. I removed it from the spare instrument cluster and installed the painted pointer from my original speedometer.  I then swapped the speedometers. This is a simple job. Unfortunately, simple does not mean easy. If I was 20 years younger and 50 pounds lighter, it might not be as difficult. There are only three screws, the speedometer cable, and three snap in instrument light sockets that have to be removed to remove the speedometer from the instrument cluster. Removing those three screws required putting my head on the driver's floorboard, and my torso on the front seat with my feet hanging over the back of the front seat back. This is not a comfortable postition to work in. Using multiple light sources to see under the dash, and a screwdriver with a magnet attached to help grip the screws, I was able to remove the speedometer. I then installed the replacement speedometer. That was even more fun than removing the other one. When I installed one of the instrument cluster lights, the bulb fell out of the socket and into the instrument cluster. I then had to remove the speedometer again to remove the loose bulb. As I was doing that and attempting to fish the loose bulb out, I was reminded of why you should remove the battery cable when working on the car (even when what you are working on is not significantly related to the electrical system). The blub managed to make contact with the amp gauge, shorting out the amp gauge. I then removed the bulb and discovered why it popped out of the socket. The base of the bulb was slightly bent making one of the pins not protrude from the base as much as it should. I reinstalled the speedometer and used a different instrument cluster bulb.

 

As soon as I confirmed that the amp gauge was fried, I then removed the four screws that hold the amp gauge and oil pressure gauge assembly in the instrument cluster. I then removed the oil pressure gauge line. I then installed a spare amp gauge and oil pressure gauge in the instrument cluster. This job is just as much fun as it requires the same work position as the speedometer job.

 

After testing, everything appears to be working properly. I figure my back and neck will be OK soon. On the plus side, I am getting better and faster at working on the instrument cluster, although if I had it to do over again, I might remove the entire instrument cluster assembly to work on the individual components in a more natural position. I was not amused while I was doing this work today, but now that it is finished, I find it slightly amusing.   

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10 hours ago, MCHinson said:

 If I was 20 years younger and 50 pounds lighter, it might not be as difficult.

 

 

think again... 🤪 it still stinks

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The speedometer that I had last installed was loud enough to irritate me. I cleaned and repaired the trip odometer on the original one. Today, I reinstalled it. With repetition, I am getting better at this job. I unhooked the battery cable, removed the speedometer, replaced the speedometer and hooked the battery back up in 20 minutes today.  

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On Saturday August 1st, on the way home from Cars and Coffe, I noticed that the accelerator pedal did not seem to be fully accelerating the car as it should. The pedal did not seem to return all of the way to its normal position. On this past Saturday, after swapping out the speedometer, as I was about to drive the car to lunch, When I hit the accelerator pedal, it went all the way to the floor, so I drove a modern car to lunch. Later I determined that the webbed cloth flexible link in the accelerator pedal linkage had broken. Today, I stopped by a local military surplus store and picked up a suitable piece of webbed belt material to replace the broken linkage. I ground off the brass rivets that held the original fabric to the accelerator rod and installed the new material with machine screws since I did not have any suitable sized brass rivets. I then reinstalled the accelerator linkage. I guess the accelerator linkage should now  be good for another 82 years.  

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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I had a few small limbs/branches down and lost power for about 12 hours. There were others here in town who lost some trees, but it was not much of a problem here. Ocean Isle Beach and Southport were the only towns in the area with lots of damage.  

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