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1938 Buick Century Model 61 - Four Door Touring Sedan - Trunk Back


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I had spoken with two other painters in my area after my Olds was done showing them pictures of the car. One does a lot of custom work and told me he would charge about $20,000 to paint my car! The other one told me $12-15,000. These guys are getting crazy 😜!! Great to see it out on the road and getting dropped off. Getting closer!

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On 11/27/2019 at 8:29 PM, chistech said:

I had spoken with two other painters in my area after my Olds was done showing them pictures of the car. One does a lot of custom work and told me he would charge about $20,000 to paint my car! The other one told me $12-15,000. These guys are getting crazy 😜!! Great to see it out on the road and getting dropped off. Getting closer!

Ted, I have seen crazy prices for painting cars. $20,000.00 is a bargain in some areas. Custom shops n Cal. are getting at least twice as much to shoot a car. With the price of paints, primers, and hourly rates, it gets very expensive. John

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I stopped by today to drop off the taillight assemblies and take a peak at progress made. The doors were in another section of the building where they are working on them. I just took a few quick photos. Not much visible change apparent in the photos, but the work seems to be progressing. He has been working on removing all of the adhesive from previous floor coverings so he can paint every square inch of the floors to protect them from any future problems. 

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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Today I stopped by to check on the progess. The fenders, trunk lid, and doors were all at his other location where I have been assured his crew are making good progress on them so there is not a lot of progress currently visible in photos. He had the tail light assemblies that he had painted in two different stypes, one in single stage and the other in basecoat/clearcoat. He wanted me to choose which I preferred. While there may be slight differences, they both look great and I really don't think I care which he uses. I told him to do them whichever way he wanted to do. After they have both been painted with his preferred method and the paint has had enough time to cure completely, he will buff the adjacent chrome edge on the taillight assemblies. They look good now, so they should eventually look great. He has cleaned all of the old adhesive off of the floors and has used rhino liner on a portion of the interior floors to protect them from any future issues. He wanted me to check that out before he did any more of it. I am happy with it and he will coat the complete floor interior with that product.  

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I have recently been evaluating the condition of the running boards that I have for this project. The original running boards from the project car were basically rusted totally away. The running boards that I am going to use were originally on another 1938 Century that I owned briefly. They are fairly complete with relatively small damaged areas of brittle rubber around the edges. Initially, I cleaned them up with soap and water. I treated all of the visible rusty parts with ospho. I then removed the running board moldings. Most of the running board molding fasteners were machine screws that were rusted enough to need to be removed with an angle grinder. New molding clips are readily available. Today, I decided to break off all of the slighly loose or damaged rubber along the outer edges of the board. This revealed a bit more rusty areas, which I also treated with ospho. While I am not very optimistic, I am going to attempt to patch the existing problem areas and apply a brush on rubber coating over the running boards. If I can repair the running boards, it will be quicker and much cheaper than sending them out to be totally restored. If they cannot be successfully patched, I can always send them out for total restoration.  

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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12 hours ago, MCHinson said:

I have recently been evaluating the condition of the running boards that I have for this project. The original running boards from the project car were basically rusted totally away. The running boards that I am going to use were originally on another 1938 Century that I owned briefly. They are fairly complete with relatively small damaged areas of brittle rubber around the edges. Initially, I cleaned them up with soap and water. I treated all of the visible rusty parts with ospho. I then removed the running board moldings. Most of the running board molding fasteners were machine screws that were rusted enough to need to be removed with an angle grinder. New molding clips are readily available. Today, I decided to break off all of the slighly loose or damaged rubber along the outer edges of the board. This revealed a bit more rusty areas, which I also treated with ospho. While I am not very optimistic, I am going to attempt to patch the existing problem areas and apply a brush on rubber coating over the running boards. If I can repair the running boards, it will be quicker and much cheaper than sending them out to be totally restored. If they cannot be successfully patched, I can always send them out for total restoration.  

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I have been using the 3M auto body panel cement (they use it for metal to metal adhering verses welding on newer cars) for repairing rubber and black bakelite parts.  Surprisingly, I saw Autozone was carrying the product in small tube, but otherwise I get it at the automotive paint store (and borrowing the 2 part calk gun from friends over weekend).  Why I like it is because it is black and sand-able, as well as polish-able.  Also, you can use tool handle dip via such as Plasti-dip and Plasti-dip spray. I would use "Rustolium - Rust Reformer Primer" on the rusty spots - clean rusty areas up a bit with your Dremel/Moto-tool. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, MCHinson said:

I have recently been evaluating the condition of the running boards that I have for this project. The original running boards from the project car were basically rusted totally away. The running boards that I am going to use were originally on another 1938 Century that I owned briefly. They are fairly complete with relatively small damaged areas of brittle rubber around the edges. Initially, I cleaned them up with soap and water. I treated all of the visible rusty parts with ospho. I then removed the running board moldings. Most of the running board molding fasteners were machine screws that were rusted enough to need to be removed with an angle grinder. New molding clips are readily available. Today, I decided to break off all of the slighly loose or damaged rubber along the outer edges of the board. This revealed a bit more rusty areas, which I also treated with ospho. While I am not very optimistic, I am going to attempt to patch the existing problem areas and apply a brush on rubber coating over the running boards. If I can repair the running boards, it will be quicker and much cheaper than sending them out to be totally restored. If they cannot be successfully patched, I can always send them out for total restoration.  

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Some extra incentive....

 

there is no one to redo your running boards anyway right now. Hunley Acuff has retired. I had been trying to get him to do 2 sets of 80 series boards for 6+ months. SOOOOO..... hope your plans work, cause I may have to copy them...

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1 hour ago, 38Buick 80C said:

 

 

Some extra incentive....

 

there is no one to redo your running boards anyway right now. Hunley Acuff has retired. I had been trying to get him to do 2 sets of 80 series boards for 6+ months. SOOOOO..... hope your plans work, cause I may have to copy them...

 

Actually there are two companies in Canada who can redo them. I got a quote from one of the companies. I have sent a second email to the second company but have not yet received a reply from them. From their websites, it looks like both do really good work. They are not fast and they are certainly not inexpensive. These running boards are not in that bad of a condition. If I can fix these myself, I would prefer to do it, since it will probably mean that I save about 3 months time and about $3000. 

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1 hour ago, MCHinson said:

 

Actually there are two companies in Canada who can redo them. I got a quote from one of the companies. I have sent a second email to the second company but have not yet received a reply from them. From their websites, it looks like both do really good work. They are not fast and they are certainly not inexpensive. These running boards are not in that bad of a condition. If I can fix these myself, I would prefer to do it, since it will probably mean that I save about 3 months time and about $3000. 

 

and those companies are named????  I've had mine off the model 87 waiting to be done so I'm ready to go 😁

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I have a few different options that I plan to try for patching the broken areas of the running boards. I am going to try to do it as economically as I can. If the cheap method does not work, I can always switch to the more expensive body panel adhesive. I have used a rustoleum primer to prime the bare metal areas of the running boards. Hopefully I will be able to get to work on those soon, but am having trouble finding time due to a recent injury that my wife suffered on December 26th. She needs fairly constant supervision and assistance and will need that for several more weeks.  While there are no photos, today I took some action that will contribute to finishing the project sooner than I was thinking. I finally bit the bullet and ordered the glass and what I hope is all of the various pieces of new rubber that are going to be needed from Steele Rubber. I have waited as long as possible to order the new rubber as it is more expensive than the original purchase of this car, more expensive than the body donor car was, and to be honest, it costs more than my current daily driver Buick as well as each of the other various cars that I have purchased in the past few years. I am not used to paying that much money for what is going to arrive in a fairly small box.

 

I also got a call from Dave Tacheny today. I need to send him a check as I have two NOS bumpers and a few other parts on the way from Dave for this project.  

Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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Maybe try this:  https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/j-b-weld-4009/chemicals---fluids-16461/glues--adhesives---sealants-19861/plastic-repair-adhesive-26400/92b002ecd9bb/j-b-weld-plastic-bonder/50139/4388163?q=panel+bonding&pos=48 

 

It is in smaller quantities so a bit cheaper - I have not sued tit thoguh as I have been using the 3M product.

 

It does say it is sandable.

 

When done spray whole running board with Plasticoast tool dip - do a test patch first though as some f the stuff is a little rubbery and may not be suitable

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Plasti-Dip-11-oz-Black-Plasti-Dip-11203-6/100131010 

 

I understand the cost factor - I am just suggesting in this case cost saves a whole lot of aggravation - and personally I was super impressed with the 3M panel Adhesive - I saw them (Quality Automotive in Cincinnati) using it one day to fix rust pits on a Alfa Romeo 2000 project and then I started using it on other projects. 

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Posted (edited)

I feel fairly confident about my plans on the running boards, but will wait until I have done it to post the details. Unfortunately, this might be delayed by a couple of weeks due to some unexpected medical issues that will keep me from being able to get on it as soon as I would like.

 

I got a call from my metal worker/painter today. I am going to stop by and see him on Monday to get some photos and an update on his progress. UPS delivered one long cardboard tube and one box from Steele Rubber today. I will have to go through it all later to make sure I ordered everything that I need, but that too will probably be medically delayed a bit. 

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Posted (edited)

My recent purchase from Dave Tachney arrived today. The bumpers are perfect, apparently rechromed in 2008 based on the newspapers that were used in packing them. The grill halves have been rechromed, but are just as Dave described them. They have some obvious pitting on the areas of them that are not that prominent. Most of the pits will be covered by the black paint but until I paint them I won't be 100% sure if I am going to be happy with them, or if I am going to have to have another pair chromed.  

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Today I stopped by and got an update on the metal repair and paint. I took a few photos but there is a lot more work that has been done that probably does not really show up in the photos. 

 

Previously, I had chipped off all of the loose rubber from the running boards. I have been working on one of them. My plan is to replace all of the removed old rubber with bondo, to bring the contour of the board up to where it was originally. I will later apply a small coating of rubber over the existing rubber and the bondo patched areas. I am nearly finished with the patching of one running board. I still have a small amount of additional bondo to apply and a bit more shaping with files and a sander, but figured I would add a photo to show the work in progress. As soon as I find the time to finish patching this running board, I will move to the second running board. When I am finished with the patching of both running boards, I will attempt to cover them both with rubber. 

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Today, I received another box of items purchased from a fellow 36-38 Buick Club member. I also had a little bit of time to work on the early stage of bondo repair of the second running board. 

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Today, I spent some more time working on the running boards. I am getting close to being ready to apply the rubber, but I will be spending a bit more time getting all of the surface area as close to perfect before I do that. I neglected to take any photos of the running boards today. I also taped off the grille halves to spray the recessed painted areas. The grille halves are not perfect but most of the visible small pits are on the painted areas so I am hoping I will be happy with them after they have dried and I remove the masking tape. After I was happy with my taping job, I sprayed them with primer. After the primer had dried, I sprayed the black paint. 

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Today, I removed the masking tape from the grille halves. Next, I used a small brush and painted the small recessed areas of the outside edge of the grille halves with black enamel paint. After allowing it to dry a bit, I rubbed the paint off of the non-recessed areas using a painter's wipe. The difficult part of this job is allowing the paint to dry enough so that you don't accidentally pull any of the paint out of the recessed areas without waiting too long making the paint removal more difficult. I will have to do a bit of touch up painting on these areas later but overall they look OK. It is really difficult to take photos that show this small detail. They actually look better in person than the photos show, since the flash photos seem to magnify the minor pitting on the grille halves. Time will tell if I am happy with these or if I will later send another set of grille halves off for a better chrome job.

 

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Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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This afternoon, I touched up the black paint on the edges of the grille halves. I waited a bit longer for the paint to dry a bit more before using painter's wipes wrapped around a small wood rectangle to wipe the paint off of the areas around the recessed sections. After I finished, I took them outside to take some better photos. While they are certainly not perfect, I am happy with the result. 

 

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Today, I received the rear vent windows and two rechromed bumper guards that I had ordered. The third photo shows after I painted the black recessed areas of the bumper guards. 

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I stopped by today and checked on the current status. Levi had most of the parts to the project out and was busy working on it when I arrived. He is hoping to be finished with primer and preparation in by Saturday when he expects to start painting. His plan is to paint the body first, roll it out of the paint booth, and then paint fenders, doors, hood, nose, and other smaller parts. That way, when the other parts are finished he will be ready to mount them on the body to minimize the opportunity for any mishaps to happen with multiple parts sitting in different areas of his shop after painting. 

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Levi had hoped to be spraying the black by now, but the preparation is taking a little bit longer than he had hoped. I stopped by today and took some photos. He (and some of his other guys) plan to complete all of the preparation for paint today and tomorrow. He is now hoping to be applying black paint on Thursday, which is when I will be on the way to Philadelphia for the AACA Annual Convention. 

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Not sure if it’s supposed to rain your way but we had a real bad rainy spell when we went to paint my Olds and black likes to fog some with excessive moisture. If he has a paint booth with heat you should be alright. It a great feeling when you get to the painting stage. Almost feels like you’re just about done then you realize there’s a ton of assembly to do! Coming along great.

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I don't know if his paint booth is equipped with heat or not, I think it is, but we have not discussed it. I am now in Philadelphia for the Annual Convention so he is supposed to send me some photos after he is painting. I took these photos yesterday but did not get a chance to post them since I was busy with earning money most of the day. 

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I guess it is good news-bad news, but Levi has still not been able to start painting. He was not quite happy with the fit of the front fenders so he did a bit more work on them rather than rush the job. I stopped by this evening and took a few photos. After he was finally happy with the fender fit, he has spent a bit more time doing more block sanding. The surface of everything is really slick. Perhaps painting will begin tomorrow.

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I’ve learned now after a few cars the better finishes are those that had a ton of block and wet sanding of the primer. And exactly as you said, the primer ends up so shiny it looks like a top coat. I’m sure your car will look great. 

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I stopped by today and was able to see two coats of clear as it was applied to the body. The black looked very good and after the clearcoats it is really looking good. Now it will sit in the paint booth until Saturday. After that, the car comes out of the paint booth and the fenders, doors, etc, go in for paint. There is still a lot of work for him to do before the paint is finished, but it certainly looks different.

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