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Duer

Questions about an old car

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Forgive my ignorance but i figured this was the best place to ask.

Last year my grandfather passed away and left me one of his cars. Its a 1907 duer highwheel. As far as we know its one of 3 in the world and i believe its the only one that still runs. Nobody in my family can take car of a car liked that and i don't want it to sit in storage until it gets ruined. The car is so in excellent condition and i would like it to stay that way. So my question is where should i sale it and how do i determine its worth. Any help would be great. This is the actual car and how it still looks. 

Screenshot_2017-08-16-21-56-59.png

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A quick google search will show this exact picture so I'm sure this post is fake in a poor attempt to scam someone here.

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The Horseless Carriage Club of America is dedicated

to cars built before 1916.  They have an excellent magazine

with for-sale ads;  and their internet site is also an excellent

place to sell such cars, where a car will get good exposure to

followers of those earliest autos.  (See www.hcca.org.)

 

There were so many small manufacturers of automobiles 

in the early 1900's that a Duer's rarity will not add appreciably

(or at all) to its value.  But such a car is interesting, and if

fairly priced, should attract someone.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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And Mr. Duer, you can show your legitimacy if you wish by

(1)  posting some more pictures--current ones--even if they are in a garage;

and (2)  indicating your grandfather's name and club affiliations, so that they

can be verified.  There's no harm in doing that.  Assuming you're legitimate,

we wish you the best.

 

Where is the car located?

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Duer,

 

Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. As you can already tell, a new member using an easy to obtain online photo of a rare car that he or she owns raises people's concerns. Please tell us more about the car and where you are located so we can either determine if some folks fears are justified or not. As soon as we get past that point, I am sure someone here can help you better.

 

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The car is in Birmingham,Al. It currently sits in my grandmother's garage. My Grandfather was Edward Todd and we was a member of one of the antique car associations years back but not sure which one. The photo i downloaded off the internet is the actual car but i will have to drive down from Nashville to take one in the garage. Im not attempting to sale it in here,  im just trying to gather information in where to sale and how to determine its worth. 

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THIS NOVEMBER-DECEMBER ANTIQUE 
AUTOMOBILE MAGAZINE VOL.35 NO#6 HAS 
MANY GOOD STORIES, ANTIQUE CAR AUCTION, 
THE PAN: PRAISEWORTHY PRODUCT OF A 
MUCH-MALIGNED COMPANY, CENTRAL DIVISION 
NATIONAL SPRING MEET; DEARBORN MICHIGAN 
JULY 14-18 1971, THE DUQUESNE "A 
SUPERLATIVE CAR", THE HISTORY OF 
DARRACQ AND REGINALD A.S. PHILLIPS: THE 
UNCOMMERCIAL COACHBUILDER. THE INSIDE 
FRONT COVER HAS A BLACK AND WHITE 
PHOTO OF AN EARLY OVERTON TRUCK, THE 
INSIDE BACK COVER HAS A BLACK AND WHITE 
PHOTO OF AN EARLY RAMBLER AND THE 
OUTSIDE BACK COVER HAS A COLOR PHOTO 
OF A 1907 DUER OWNED BY: EDWARD C. TODD 
OF BIRMINGHAM AL.

 

NOV-DEC19712-541x402.jpg

 

Todd was well-known in the antique car community, traveling around the country with his 1907 Duer. He enjoyed participating in the opening of interstates and led the prerace of antique cars at Talledega 500. 

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)
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Talking to the owner of an International high-wheeler 

at the Hershey show a few years ago, I learned that

those Internationals sell in the range of $35,000 for a 

nice one in proper running condition.  I don't have enough 

experience to say whether a Duer would bring more, 

though if it is not currently in reliable running condition,

that would subtract rather significantly from its value.

 

You're right that antique cars must be properly maintained

and driven.  If you inherit a grandparent's silver vase or

old wooden trunk, you can enjoy it indefinitely and tuck it

away for decades.  Not so with a car, which is machinery.

 

Mr. Duer, never try to judge a car's value by ASKING prices.

Sometimes they are only 10% or 20% above a true value;

but in more recent years, asking prices are sometimes DOUBLE

a car's true worth, to the point of being irrelevant.  That's especially

true of antique-car dealers, but sometimes occurs among

regular sellers too.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Id like to thank everyone for their input. I will reach out to the Horseless Carriage Association and get there input. I may wind up donating it to a museum in the Birmingham area if they will agree to keep my grandfathers name on a plaque with it. Since it was his pride and joy for many years i think it would be a great way to honor him. I just want the car to stay in great condition and not be destroyed from sitting in storage. Once again thank you for the help. 

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Probably the best way to make certain that the car is neglected is to donate it to a museum. Most museum cars are a flashy (but not very good) paint job on a non-running car that will require a great deal of work. Many museums have a policy of NEVER running cars but treating them as static displays. When you consider that the current trend in American museums is to hire "museum professionals", usually with no specific knowledge of the museum's collection, this isn't surprising. The car would be far better cared for in the possession of a collector who is prepared to expend some of his disposable income to acquire it. You might  sell it for less than it's perceived market value if you like the buyer, It's really up to you but a museum is nearly always a poor choice.

 

Search this forum for threads that mention "museum restoration" if you don't believe me.

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Jay Leno would LOVE that vehicle. Contact him. He will not let it just sit.

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I think contacting Leno is a great idea!

Even if he's not interested his curator/mechanic might give you some good info.

 

He/they can be contacted from the facebook page >>> https://www.facebook.com/jaylenosgarage/ or his site >>> https://www.lenosgarage.com/pages/contact-us

Edited by cahartley (see edit history)
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There is a high wheeler event (basically a low speed race) every year at the AACA meet in Hershey, PA.  I'll bet your grandfather and his Duer participated in this event years ago. A great way to honor your grandfather would be to donate it to the AACA Library and Research Center. If you did so we would happily volunteer the services of our restoration shop (PennDutchREstoration.com) to get it running and see that it participated in the high wheeler event.

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4 hours ago, Duer said:

The car is in Birmingham,Al. It currently sits in my grandmother's garage. My Grandfather was Edward Todd and we was a member of one of the antique car associations years back but not sure which one. The photo i downloaded off the internet is the actual car but i will have to drive down from Nashville to take one in the garage. Im not attempting to sale it in here,  im just trying to gather information in where to sale and how to determine its worth. 

 

Thanks for the reply. In case anyone still has any doubt, I can confirm that Duer's IP address is consistent with where he says he is, so I am convinced. 

 

Duer,

 

I would suggest that you contact AACA Headquarters. If the car was featured in Antique Automobile Magazine, that would make it fairly clear that your grandfather was a member of AACA. AACA should have some records of the car available.  I would also suggest that Restorer32's suggestion of donating it to AACA Library and Research Center would be an excellent choice if you decide to donate it to a non-profit where it would be cherished and taken care of in an appropriate manner, to honor your grandfather.

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I think it might be worthwhile to point out to Mr. Duer that you are NOT talking about the "AACA Museum." This is a case where a non-specialist might be very confused. And, my remarks regarding museums do not apply to the AACA Library & Research Center.

Edited by JV Puleo
typo (see edit history)
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I do remember seeing the AACA sticker on the Bradley GT that i bought from him. Ill defiantly look i to their research library.  Thanks for the help

Edited by Duer (see edit history)

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The photo at the very top of this thread is the same one that is on the back of the magazine, Antique Automobile, 1971, VOL.35 NO 6, in case anyone has it.

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3 minutes ago, mike6024 said:

The photo at the very top of this thread is the same one that is on the back of the magazine, Antique Automobile, 1971, VOL.35 NO 6, in case anyone has it.

Im sure the magazine is in some of my grandfathers stuff. He kept a complete record of the car from the day he found it all through the restoration.  He even has photos of it with Johnny Cash and Missy from HeeHaw. 

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I agree that contacting AACA headquarters to discuss would be a good idea and give you some options to consider perhaps.  There may even be some history on the car if it has received AACA awards previously.   Advertising it for sale via AACA or even HCCA would be the best opportunities for an outright sale as that's where you'll most easily find the high wheeler enthusiasts.   Although my knowledge is limited, I believe most museums may not able to work with conditional arrangements.  Be cautious and realize once you do donate it to a museum you have no further control over it and  may never see it again. Just make sure you have full knowledge of all the factors involved before you make any decisions.   There is a small but thriving group of lovers of these early high wheel vehicles, even though they are not so usable as driving type vehicles.  It's great to see them when they are shown.  Would indeed be great to see some updates photos and hopefully it's held up well over the years.  Neat looking car.  Don't know how many remain.

Terry

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Nice car, I hope the HCCA people can be of help to you, bit to old for current AACA types. Bob

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1 hour ago, 1937hd45 said:

Nice car, I hope the HCCA people can be of help to you, bit to old for current AACA types. Bob

What?  That's a strange comment, there are numerous AACA  "types" on this forum who not only own, or have owned, high wheelers, and we still like them.  I owned a beautiful Sears Autobuggy for years.  This is a fascinating car, rare, although rare doesn't translate  to big bucks.  Depending on current condition, I think this car is in the $18k to 25k range.  Giving it to AACA Library, NOT museum, is a wonderful idea., and you could "write it off", whatever that means!

 

Now, if your comment concerns the AACA forum and questions about computer codes and electronics, I agree, the forum is drifting away from true antique cars and lots of comments about power accessories and computer systems.  Big bone of contention and discussion, but discussing how the power top switch works on a 1992 Whatsit Gogomobile is not my idea of an antique car forum.

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