countrytravler

How to load and tie down a car with a U-Haul car hauler.

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I don't understand why they do not secure the rear of the towed vehicle. Seems to me that when (not IF, but WHEN) the towed trailer sways as a result of an inexperienced driver going too fast, or other conditions, that the towed vehicle's rear will jump off of the trailer, or that when this rig rear-ends something, the front of the trailer isn't enough to keep the car from coming forward off of the trailer, at least the distance of the single slack rear chain.

 

I always cross-tie my rear axle straps, and sometimes also straight-tie a second pair, same for the front - better safe than sorry?

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20 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

I don't understand why they do not secure the rear of the towed vehicle. Seems to me that when (not IF, but WHEN) the towed trailer sways as a result of an inexperienced driver going too fast, or other conditions, that the towed vehicle's rear will jump off of the trailer, or that when this rig rear-ends something, the front of the trailer isn't enough to keep the car from coming forward off of the trailer, at least the distance of the single slack rear chain.

 

I always cross-tie my rear axle straps, and sometimes also straight-tie a second pair, same for the front - better safe than sorry?

Marty,

 

Very valid concern regarding not securing the rear of the vehicle on the trailer.

I saw a real world example of this a couple of months ago after a local gathering of Ferraris in my area. An open car trailer hauling a beautiful Ferrari hit a dip in the road in front of my house. The rear of the Ferrari literally shifted sideways maybe 6 inches. In this case the car was anchored in the rear but it was not properly done.

Fortunate for the car owner, the trailer had a solid floor and was wide enough that the car did not come off the side of the trailer. 

 

IMHO, U-Haul trailers are not very well suited for towing some vehicles. The front rachet straps require that the vehicle be moved all the way forward until the tire makes contact with the stops. Unless the vehicle being towed is not very heavy in the front, that creates an unbalanced load on the trailer and  produces excessive tongue weight on the tow vehicle. It also prevents one from moving the towed vehicle backwards to decrease excessive tongue weight and balance the load on the trailer. If one looks closely in the video one can see visual evidence of that the pickup in the video is squatting to a degree. If I had a $ for every tow vehicle I have seen squatting (more than slightly) while pulling a loaded U-Haul car trailer over the years I could treat multiple members and their spouses to dinner.

 

Charlie

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My background to speak about this subject.

I have been hauling cars from 1968 to present. Started with a single car and worked my self up to a 14 car hauler. Logged 4 million plus miles accident-free. I use to own a tow truck company in the 80s and 90s with 15 tow trucks from light duty to heavy duty with rotators and an air bag recovery system. I presently run a tow company in the hills of northern CA. We are also a U-Haul satellite terminal with limited trucks, trailers, pads, and dollies.

I have never seen a U-Haul car hauler in trouble that a U-Haul truck was pulling. Most of these are pulled with our U-Haul trucks and seldom with personal vehicles. When I haul cars on a hauler, we have to have a 4 point tie down, (all 4 corners) I ask my U-Haul field rep about this. He said that on a single car trailer, it's not mandatory. I asked our CA DOT man and he said that it's not mandatory that only a safety chain is required in the rear. We have to check the towing setup on personal vehicles and ask what they are towing. We have no control what the customer does once he has left our shop. I saw one customer put a 65 Chry Imp on the trailer and when he pick the trailer up from us, he put down a Honda Civic. If he is involved in an accident,  he is fully responsible for damage to our equipment and personal property. For a number of accidents for the equipment we rent out, there are more accidents with personal people hauling-pulling trailers than the big 3 rental companies. This is what happened in Canada. LOL

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Info on the one car trailer posted on the pass side fender. Where have you seen jackknife bumper stops? They do work. 

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I watched the video.

 

No car can be loaded & secured for transport in 5 minutes.

 

I have no clue what the statistics are - but customers routinely rent trailers from U-Haul & other rental companies and then lie about

the tow vehicle they are using and/or the vehicle they are putting on the trailer.

 

Insurance coverage does not prevent an accident - injury - death ....

 

It just addresses the consequences .....

 

Anticipating a U-Haul trailer being pulled down the road at 75 + miles per hour with no electric trailer brakes and just a two point secure attahment

on the front wheels by someone with little or no experience hauling a car does not make me feel particularly safe ....

 

Any open car hauler trailer should be equipped with electric trailer brakes in good working order and the vehicle on it should have a four point tie down.

 

 

Jim

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16 minutes ago, Trulyvintage said:

I watched the video.

 

No car can be loaded & secured for transport in 5 minutes.

 

I have no clue what the statistics are - but customers routinely rent trailers from U-Haul & other rental companies and then lie about

the tow vehicle they are using and/or the vehicle they are putting on the trailer.

 

Insurance coverage does not prevent an accident - injury - death ....

 

It just addresses the consequences .....

 

Anticipating a U-Haul trailer being pulled down the road at 75 + miles per hour with no electric trailer brakes and just a two point secure attahment

on the front wheels by someone with little or no experience hauling a car does not make me feel particularly safe ....

 

Any open car hauler trailer should be equipped with electric trailer brakes in good working order and the vehicle on it should have a four point tie down.

 

 

Jim

I totally agree. Been doing U-Haul for 6 years and rented hundreds of these trailers. Never heard of an incident. I have pulled these trailers with my 1/2 ton Chev local around here and had a 62 Chev on the trailer. These trailers are built pretty well. I was impressed by the handling and the ease of loading. It only takes about 10 minutes but I did a 4 point tie down. Here is the truck that I use.

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