Steve Moskowitz

Cars That Made America

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13 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Looks like it would be fun to watch. I do not have cable, can it be viewed online?

You could always check the history channel's website after it airs. I'm not sure if you can access it or not, but worth a try!

 

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Previews look good, sure beats watching another burn out in a Mustang "restored' in seven days. Bob

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Just hope it is not too revisionist. Might ask Bill Collins who first suggested dropping a 389 in the new Tempest.

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Earlier this year I was contacted by the Archivist/research specialist for information on William C. Durant and the Durant cars of later years. Put them in touch with our club's historian who is very knowledgeable about Durant and his history with GM as well as Durant Motors Inc.  Provided some photographs from our museum web site too.  I agree with Steve, we can't be too critical since any time that channel now talks about something old, other than crab fishing in Alaska and other non-historical content, it's a good thing.  I'm sure they will take liberties since the production company is in NYC and I'm sure not "car people"

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Wonder if they will show Billy's bowling alley. My DVR is set for the series.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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Don't know,  that's what he owned at the end of his life, wanted to have a chain of bowling alleys for everyone to enjoy.  I'm always fascinated about Billy Durant's career. I've read all the books on him and I don't think he gets the credit he deserves for starting General Motors. The fame usually goes to Sloan who was hired by Billy and took over after him.  It will be interesting to see how the paint him and Louis Chevrolet, who was a flamboyant French race car driver that Durant brought into the fold, but later separated from the Chevrolet Motors Corporation over disagreements over what type of car to make the "Chevrolet" as well as other things. 

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Any time they focus on cars and car people it is a positive event for the hobby, rather than de-constructing for "personal taste" with a Five Day Restoration resulting in a Quickie Profit fallacy.

 

My DVR is set to record the event.

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I'm looking forward to watching.   I hope they don't distort history too much

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Yes, this will be great, and comes at the perfect time. Home in the recliner with a broken leg. Ain't going anywhere for a while so get to catch on all the old car shows available. Like Bob says tho, in some cases id rather watch the commercials, so this will be welcome addition.

Terry

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I'm looking forward to the program. However there will likely be some obvious mistakes that a true afficenado will be able to spot. Just remember folks, it produced to meet LCD( Lowest Common Denominator) to attract the maximim viewership, so try not to throw any wrenchs at the TV!!

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I watched the first episode last night.  It was okay overall - not the best I have seen but certainly not the worst.  It was interesting but I could have done without the commentary by the NASCAR drivers though.  :rolleyes:  

 

Bob

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Well gang, they did not disappoint on the entertainment but they sure did reaffirm the constant lack of research shows like this do in regards to content.  There were so many errors in the first part that I was screaming at the TV set!  I especially liked the 1904 Curved Dash Olds being shown as a prototype by Edsel Ford of a car to replace the Model "T"!!!  Researching facts is not that hard and the editing mixing up eras was hard to take. 

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5 minutes ago, Steve Moskowitz said:

Well gang, they did not disappoint on the entertainment but they sure did reaffirm the constant lack of research shows like this do in regards to content.  There were so many errors in the first part that I was screaming at the TV set!  I especially liked the 1904 Curved Dash Olds being shown as a prototype by Edsel Ford of a car to replace the Model "T"!!!  Researching facts is not that hard and the editing mixing up eras was hard to take. 

Yea I thought that was funny in a sad way.  Nothing like going backwards to get your Model T replacement LOL.

 

I think most of these documentaries are done on a tight budget and they are more interested in getting the show on the air that spending time to make sure it is accurate

 

Bob

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Ah, we can post again, not sure what happened but finally just called headquarters.

Note: a single point failure that takes out everything including error reporting is not a good thing.

 

Figured what was going on when even before the credits they showed a European steam locomotive ( buffers instead of cow catcher & several times later).

 

Usual Discover channel constant repetition.

 

Then could easily tell the good guys from the bad guys by facial expressions. Seemed like rich=bad, poor=good. Suspect Walter P. will win in the end.

 

Glad they at least mentioned the Selden Patent (but not the ALAM which owned the patent after 1899 - guess that was too complicated).

 

Definitely worth watching but need a history book to understand what happened when since time is mutable.

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What the Hell. I enjoyed it. When I want  a dry  history lesson I read a book. I especially liked the way they portrayed Louis Chevrolet. The French, go figure...........Bob

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who needs a TV show when I have you guys.  the Kaiser-Frazer Corporation bailout 44 million US tax dollars should be part of this TV show

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Swiss ? Wonder if Fronty Fords will get a mention. Agree I enjoyed it but kept hitting glitches: have to suspend all knowledge of what was really going on (hard for me) and ignore the "rest of the story" - e.g. what became Cadillac. Does worry me that some will take this as gospel instead of a PBI.

 

 

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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52 minutes ago, Steve Moskowitz said:

Well gang, they did not disappoint on the entertainment but they sure did reaffirm the constant lack of research shows like this do in regards to content.  There were so many errors in the first part that I was screaming at the TV set!  I especially liked the 1904 Curved Dash Olds being shown as a prototype by Edsel Ford of a car to replace the Model "T"!!!  Researching facts is not that hard and the editing mixing up eras was hard to take. 

So I do have to ask, with peoples  concern that interest in vintage/classic/collector cars shrinking. And with clubs like this having such a vast knowledge of the different makes/models/history of the automobile. Would it not be in the best interest of this club to reach out to production companies, and work with them on future projects. Would that not draw positive attention to this club/library/show/swap meet? Not to mention getting history right. Having credits coming back to the AACA would help. 

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I started to post a comment right after the opening scene which was subtitled as 1927 but showed a 1931 Model A.  Then I realized it was just entertainment and watched. realizing that with limited time and such a large scope to cover yet keep itinteresting to the masses, it met their goal of  being entertaining.  I'm sure for the general public it helped with some understanding of the various twists and turns in the early automobile industry.  It's always too bad the cars don't match the time-line.  Steve- I'm surprised your TV survived - my sore broken leg jumped as soon as I saw the curved dash Olds covered up, being uses as a prop for Edsell's "prototype" replacement for the Model T.  I wonder who their "historical" person was and how they went about obtaining the vehicles for use in the production?  The 1915 T they had used as the "earliest" Model T was a  cute tour car but think they could have easily done better with the early History of the breed.

Will continue watching, and  still have plenty of popcorn, although the Dr says no beer just yet, I'll handle that during the re-runs. 

 

For strict "Shut up and Eat your Popcorn" value I'd give it a C+ with rather poor/stiff acting being a disappointment.

For historical value and accuracy - we'll let's have some more popcorn!

 

Terry

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Helping such sounds like fun to me but then am not an ex drip, just know how and when to ask questions. (Usually spend most of my time in posts doing research).

 

Was a series on PBS years ago called "Connections". That was history presented with the people and times that led to major advances (standing on the shoulders of giants). Was fascinating & guess that is the standard I hold docuhistories to.

 

Do wish they would spend more time on the forces all coming together and spreading apart in many different directions than repeating the same shot of someone in a strange tie grimacing at a line of cars five or six times. Guess that is one way to lower production costs.

 

ps I like ascots but those cravats were just strange and no celluloid collars ?

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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Xander, all I can tell you is that we have in fact reached out to many major channels and offered them free research by our library.  You know the saying you can lead a horse.....

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We're like doctors watching a doctor show or pilots watching an aviation flick. You have remember that "we" are not the target audience per se. The shows producers have only one goal in mind. That's to make money. To make that money it's imperative that they entertain the widest audience possible and that they stick around long enough to give the hucksters a crack at them. I do think they have succeeded. If the audience gets hit with factual over spray, good. If not, so what, just as long as they stick around long enough to be talked into buying something.

Personally I liked the show. But then I'm rather easily entertained.....................Bob

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