Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This is a definitive period in the history of the TC. It is a time when the rate of attrition is going to be at its peak due to a confluence of factors, and the number of cars ulimately surviving will depend much on what sort of equilibrium is established among these sometimes complimentary but often opposing considerations.<P>First of all, the TC has reached a juncture where is value (in economic terms only as opposed to aesthetic or historic) is at or is fast approaching its nadir. This low "blue book", coupled with the unavailability of many body related components, means that cars involved in the most minor collsions are likely to be "totalled" out by insurers. Other cars will be lost to simply being worn out, or possibly because the cost of bring them into emissions compliance will be perceived as too high (some notorious government sponsored "buy & crush" programs may come into play here). Paradoxically, the accelerating exhaustion of the existing stocks of new replacement parts has created a situation in which the the value of the parts for a TC enthusiast on what would otherwise be in most people's judgment just another older, cheap used car can easily exceed its low purchase price as an entire vehicle. Therefore, there is a now a temptation to buy up marginal cars (high mileage or less than perfectly kept) & immediately part them out, even though they might otherwise be saved for posterity. This may seem to be wantonly destructive to the purist, even though it is an unpleasant and unavoidable reality that for almost any automobile, at some point some examples have to be sacrificed on the junkyard altar to keep the best ones remaining whole.<P>As the pool of cars registered & on the road shrinks under these pressures, the relative availability of salvaged parts will increase, with the market for those parts softening under this two pronged supply & demand attack (with the reward for tearing down additional cars thus lessening as well). Being that not so many TC's were manufactured to begin with, & given its special attributes, eventually the value of the remaining cars on the road will also begin to creep up off the present lows as the TC makes a transition from "used car" status to that of a recognized collectible. This will be the point (probably some years from now yet) at which restoration will become a viable alternative despite its expense.<P>For now, the choice for the individual owner is tougher, though. Do you hang on to your TC & wait out the depreciation cycle, or strip it down & make money on it while the clear opportunity is there?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I have to agree but it is sad that some cars, and not just the TC's, have to go by the wayside in this fashion.<BR>Let's just say that in the case where there is a neglected TC without possibility of restoration, then "dying" for the good of the remaining TC's may not be a bad thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Stephen,

Very well stated. It's just too bad the aftermarket hasn't seen fit to attempt to manufacture replacement body parts, such as headlight lenses. I think you're absolutely "right-on" regarding the "nadir" thing. As the remaining fleet of TC's age, and as the values begin to rise due to the increasing rarity and due to the handsome styling of these unique drop-tops, that the aftermarket will take notice at some point and start re-producing the parts that are most in demand. At least I hope so! Regards, Denny Zucconi

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

You know I am in this boat right now trying to deside what I want to do with this car. It's a 90 TC, black and brown interior. 120000 or so miles. But it's been a daily driver, and has some problems. It's the V-6 and it's needing the valve seals replaced. the Left headlight is broken but the ultra rare right side lights are mint. The chrome has dings, the body has dings, so what do I do. I can sell it or part the car. But it's a $1000 car to sell it the way it is. But as parts, or selling it to the right person for parts, it have real value I figure it to be worth $2000 to $4000 as a parts car and more than that if parted out piece by piece. It's not that I don't like the car, I do... but it's not my thing. I am not the FWD, convertable type. I like the convertable part, but to me the car lacks performance. But I drive a 2900 lb hotrod most of the time. SO what do I do with this thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure what decision that you will make - and at the risk of sounding like a vulture - if indeed you do decide to sell for parts I sure could use a back up light and lens. Mine was broken in a minore rear ender and i can't seem to replace it. My email is tod_mcnab@telus.net - thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...